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HomeMy WebLinkAbout2002RESOLUTION NO. 2OO2 A RESOLUTION of the City Council of the City of Kent, Washington, adopting the 20Lg City of Kent Water System Plan RECITALS A. The purpose of the Water System Plan (2019 Plan) is to ensure a safe and reliable supply of water to current and future customers. In addition, the 2Ot9 Plan is used to assess the distribution system for compliance with standard operating requirements and to plan for future growth. B. The 2019 Plan was prepared in accordance with Washington Administrative Code 246-290-L00, which requires water purveyors to submit a water system plan for review and approval by the Washington State Department of Health. C. The 2019 Plan meets Washington State Department of Health, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Kent Fire Code regulations. The 2019 Plan reflects King County's population growth allocation to Kent within the current Urban Growth Area, which is consistent with Kent's 2015 Comprehensive Plan and King County's 2018 Comprehensive Plan updates. Adoption of 2O19 Water System Plan 1 D. The 2019 Plan updates and replaces the 2008 Water System PIan approved by Resolution 1789, adopted on May 20, 2008. E. After City adoption, the 20L9 Plan is subject to final approval by the Washington State Department of Health. NOW THEREFORE, THE CIry COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF KENT, WASHINGTON, DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AS FOLLOWS: RESOLUTION SECTION 7. - Recitals Incorporated. The above Recitals are incorporated into this resolution and constitute the findings of the Kent City Council. SECTION 2, - Adoption of 2019 City of Kent Water System Plan. The City of Kent hereby adopts the 2019 City of Kent Water System Plan, attached as Exhibit A. SECTION 3, - Severability. If any one or more section, subsection, or sentence of this resolution is held to be unconstitutional or invalid, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portion of this resolution and the same shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 4, - Corrections by City Clerk Upon approval of the city attorney, the city clerk is authorized to make necessary corrections to this resolution, including the correction of clerical errors; resolution, section, or subsection numbering; or references to other local, state, or federal laws, codes, rules, or regulations. SECTION 5. - Effective Date. This resolution shall take effect and be in force immediately upon its passage. 2 Adoption of 2O19 Water System Plan NA MLPH, ATTEST: t KIMBERLEY A.oTo, CITY CLE APPROVED AS TO November 19, 2019 Date Approved November 19. 2019 Date Adopted FITZPATRICK, CITY ATTORN EY 3 Adoption of 2O19 Water System Plan WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2019 PREPARED BYPREPARED BYCity of KentWATER SYSTEM PLANCity of KentWATER SYSTEM PLANAGENCY REVIEW DRAFT 2018AGENCY REVIEW DRAFT 2018EXHIBIT A THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK City of Kent Water System Plan MAY 2019 FINAL SEPTEMBER 2019 Mayor Dana Ralph City Council Bill Boyce, President Brenda Fincher Dennis Higgins Satwinder Kaur Marli Larimer Les Thomas Toni Troutner Public Works Director Timothy LaPorte City of Kent 220 Fourth Avenue S Kent, WA 98032 Prepared by: RH2 Engineering, Inc. 22722 29th Drive SE, Suite 210 Bothell, WA 98021 Contact: Michele Campbell, P.E. (425) 951-5394 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSP CERTIFICATION.DOC CERTIFICATION This Water System Plan for the City of Kent was prepared under the direction of the following registered professional engineers. _____________________________________ Ryan M. Withers, P.E. _____________________________________ Michele R. Campbell, P.E. _____________________________________ Geoffrey G. Dillard, P.E. 05/10/2019 05/10/2019 05/10/2019 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK City of Kent Water System Plan Table of Contents 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PURPOSE OF THE WATER SYSTEM PLAN ...................................................................................................... ES-1 SUMMARY OF KEY ELEMENTS........................................................................................................................ ES-1 Water Service Area .............................................................................................................................................. ES-1 Existing Water System ......................................................................................................................................... ES-2 Past Water Usage ................................................................................................................................................. ES-6 Future Water Demands and Water Supply ........................................................................................................... ES-7 Water Source and Quality .................................................................................................................................... ES-9 Operations and Maintenance ................................................................................................................................ ES-9 Water System Evaluation ................................................................................................................................... ES-10 Proposed Water System Improvements and Financing Plan .............................................................................. ES-11 CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION WATER SYSTEM OWNERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................... 1-1 OVERVIEW OF EXISTING SYSTEM .................................................................................................................... 1-1 AUTHORIZATION AND PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................... 1-2 SUMMARY OF WSP CONTENTS.......................................................................................................................... 1-3 DEFINITION OF TERMS ........................................................................................................................................ 1-3 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS .....................................................................................................................................1-5 CHAPTER 2 – WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................................2-1 WATER SERVICE AREA.........................................................................................................................................2-1 History ................................................................................................................................................................... 2-1 Retail Water Service Area ...................................................................................................................................... 2-2 Topography ............................................................................................................................................................ 2-2 Geology .................................................................................................................................................................. 2-3 INVENTORY OF EXISTING WATER FACILITIES ..............................................................................................2-4 Pressure Zones ....................................................................................................................................................... 2-4 Supply Facilities ..................................................................................................................................................... 2-7 Pump Station Facilities ........................................................................................................................................ 2-12 Storage Facilities .................................................................................................................................................. 2-15 Distribution and Transmission System ................................................................................................................ 2-20 Pressure Reducing, Pressure Sustaining, and Flow Control Stations ................................................................... 2-23 Water System Operation and Control/Telemetry and Supervisory Cont rol System ............................................ 2-24 Water System Interties ......................................................................................................................................... 2-25 WATER SERVICE AGREEMENTS .......................................................................................................................2-26 Water Service Area Agreement ........................................................................................................................... 2-26 South King County Regional Water Association Joint Operating Agreement ..................................................... 2-26 Second Supply Project Partnership Agreement .................................................................................................... 2-26 SATELLITE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT ...............................................................................................................2-27 ADJACENT WATER SYSTEMS............................................................................................................................2-28 City of Auburn ..................................................................................................................................................... 2-30 City of Renton ...................................................................................................................................................... 2-30 City of Tukwila .................................................................................................................................................... 2-30 Covington Water District ..................................................................................................................................... 2-30 Highline Water District ........................................................................................................................................ 2-30 Lakehaven Water and Sewer District ................................................................................................................... 2-30 Soos Creek Water and Sewer District .................................................................................................................. 2-31 Lake Meridian Water District .............................................................................................................................. 2-31 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC ii CHAPTER 3 – LAND USE AND POPULATION INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................................3-1 COMPATIBILITY WITH OTHER PLANS AND POLICIES ..................................................................................3-1 Growth Management Act ....................................................................................................................................... 3-1 Puget Sound Regional Council Vision 2040 Part III: Multicounty Planning Policies ........................................... 3-2 City of Kent Comprehensive Plan .......................................................................................................................... 3-3 City of Kent Midway Subarea Plan ....................................................................................................................... 3-3 City of Kent Downtown Subarea Action Plan ....................................................................................................... 3-3 City of Tukwila Comprehensive Plan .................................................................................................................... 3-4 City of Auburn Comprehensive Plan ..................................................................................................................... 3-4 King County Countywide Planning Policies .......................................................................................................... 3-4 King County Comprehensive Plan ......................................................................................................................... 3-4 South King County Coordinated Water System Plan............................................................................................. 3-5 LAND USE ................................................................................................................................................................3-5 POPULATION ...........................................................................................................................................................3-6 Household Trends .................................................................................................................................................. 3-6 Existing and Future City Population ...................................................................................................................... 3-7 Water System Population ....................................................................................................................................... 3-9 Water System Employment.................................................................................................................................. 3-10 CHAPTER 4 – WATER DEMANDS INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 4-1 Certificate of Water Availability ............................................................................................................................ 4-1 CURRENT POPULATION AND SERVICE CONNECTIONS .............................................................................. 4-1 Water Use Classifications ...................................................................................................................................... 4-1 Residential and Employment Population Served ................................................................................................... 4-2 EXISTING WATER DEMANDS ............................................................................................................................. 4-2 Water Consumption ............................................................................................................................................... 4-2 Water Supply ......................................................................................................................................................... 4-6 Distribution System Leakage ............................................................................................................................... 4-11 Existing Equivalent Residential Units.................................................................................................................. 4-12 Peak Demands ...................................................................................................................................................... 4-14 Fire Flow Demand ............................................................................................................................................... 4-16 FUTURE WATER DEMANDS .............................................................................................................................. 4-17 Basis for Projecting Demands .............................................................................................................................. 4-17 Demand Forecasts and Conservation ................................................................................................................... 4-17 CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ............................................................................................................................ 4-19 Climate Change Projections ................................................................................................................................. 4-19 Source Vulnerability Impacts ............................................................................................................................... 4-21 Demand Impacts .................................................................................................................................................. 4-21 CHAPTER 5 – REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................................................................ 5-1 Federal Requirements ............................................................................................................................................ 5-1 State of Washington Requirements ........................................................................................................................ 5-2 King County Requirements .................................................................................................................................... 5-2 CONDITIONS OF WATER SERVICE .................................................................................................................... 5-3 FIRE FLOW REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................................................. 5-3 SOURCE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................................... 5-3 Source Quantity ..................................................................................................................................................... 5-3 Water Quality Standards ........................................................................................................................................ 5-3 Permit Exempt Wells ............................................................................................................................................. 5-4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC iii GENERAL WATER MAIN REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................................... 5-4 Pipeline Velocities ................................................................................................................................................. 5-4 Water Main Extensions .......................................................................................................................................... 5-4 Water System Design Parameters .......................................................................................................................... 5-4 Water Main Location ............................................................................................................................................. 5-5 VALVES ................................................................................................................................................................... 5-5 Combination Air/Vacuum Release Valves ............................................................................................................ 5-6 Blowoffs ................................................................................................................................................................. 5-6 FIRE HYDRANTS .................................................................................................................................................... 5-6 Hydrant Location ................................................................................................................................................... 5-6 Hydrant Connections.............................................................................................................................................. 5-6 Hydrant Assemblies ............................................................................................................................................... 5-7 CROSS-CONNECTION CONTROL........................................................................................................................ 5-7 Backflow Prevention .............................................................................................................................................. 5-7 Premise Isolation .................................................................................................................................................... 5-7 Irrigation System .................................................................................................................................................... 5-8 Dedicated Fire Lines .............................................................................................................................................. 5-8 STORAGE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................................. 5-8 Operational Storage................................................................................................................................................ 5-8 Equalizing Storage ................................................................................................................................................. 5-8 Standby Storage ..................................................................................................................................................... 5-8 Fire Flow Storage ................................................................................................................................................... 5-9 Dead Storage .......................................................................................................................................................... 5-9 TELEMETRY SYSTEMS......................................................................................................................................... 5-9 BACKUP POWER REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................... 5-9 PROJECT REVIEW PROCEDURES ....................................................................................................................... 5-9 Public Works Projects ............................................................................................................................................ 5-9 Developer Extension Projects .............................................................................................................................. 5-10 Latecomers Agreements ....................................................................................................................................... 5-11 UTILITY CONNECTION PERMITS ..................................................................................................................... 5-12 Duty to Serve ....................................................................................................................................................... 5-12 Permit Requirements ............................................................................................................................................ 5-12 TEMPORARY WATER SERVICE ........................................................................................................................ 5-13 CHAPTER 6 – WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 6-1 EXISTING WATER SOURCES AND TREATMENT ............................................................................................ 6-1 Water Sources ........................................................................................................................................................ 6-1 Rock Creek Protection/Clark Springs Water Supply System ................................................................................. 6-5 Clark Springs Habitat Conservation Plan ............................................................................................................... 6-6 Water Treatment .................................................................................................................................................... 6-7 WATER RIGHTS...................................................................................................................................................... 6-7 Existing Potable Water Rights and Interties .......................................................................................................... 6-7 Pending Potable Water Right Applications .......................................................................................................... 6-17 Non-Potable Water Rights Held by the City ........................................................................................................ 6-17 Non-Potable and Non-Consumptive Water Right Applications Held by the City ............................................... 6-18 Permit Exempt Wells ........................................................................................................................................... 6-18 Water Supply Evaluation ..................................................................................................................................... 6-19 Recent Water Right Actions................................................................................................................................. 6-21 LONG-TERM WATER SUPPLY PLANNING ..................................................................................................... 6-23 Feasibility of Obtaining New Water Rights ......................................................................................................... 6-24 Feasibility of Transferring Existing Water Rights ............................................................................................... 6-24 DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS ................................................................................................................. 6-25 Overview .............................................................................................................................................................. 6-25 Existing Regulations ............................................................................................................................................ 6-25 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC iv Future Regulations ............................................................................................................................................... 6-32 SOURCE WATER QUALITY ................................................................................................................................ 6-33 Drinking Water Standards .................................................................................................................................... 6-33 Source Monitoring Requirements and Waivers ................................................................................................... 6-33 Source Monitoring Results ................................................................................................................................... 6-34 Groundwater Protection/Reliability Studies ......................................................................................................... 6-34 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER QUALITY ................................................................................................... 6-35 Monitoring Requirements and Results ................................................................................................................. 6-35 CHAPTER 7 – WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................................7-1 PRESSURE ZONES...................................................................................................................................................7-1 SOURCE CAPACITY EVALUATION .....................................................................................................................7-3 Analysis Criteria .................................................................................................................................................... 7-3 Source Capacity Analysis Results .......................................................................................................................... 7-3 WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES EVALUATION .....................................................................................................7-5 Analysis Criteria .................................................................................................................................................... 7-5 Supply Analysis Results ......................................................................................................................................... 7-6 Facility Deficiencies ............................................................................................................................................ 7-21 STORAGE FACILITIES .........................................................................................................................................7-21 Analysis Criteria .................................................................................................................................................. 7-21 Storage Analysis Results ...................................................................................................................................... 7-23 Facility Deficiencies ............................................................................................................................................ 7-32 DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSMISSION SYSTEM ..............................................................................................7-33 Analysis Criteria .................................................................................................................................................. 7-33 Hydraulic Model .................................................................................................................................................. 7-33 Hydraulic Analysis Results .................................................................................................................................. 7-37 Deficiencies .......................................................................................................................................................... 7-42 TELEMETRY AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL SYSTEM ................................................................................7-42 Evaluation and Deficiencies ................................................................................................................................. 7-43 SYSTEM CAPACITY .............................................................................................................................................7-43 Analysis Criteria .................................................................................................................................................. 7-43 Capacity Analysis Results .................................................................................................................................... 7-44 CHAPTER 8 – OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM WATER DEPARTMENT GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................................................... 8-1 WATER SYSTEM ORGANIZATION, MANAGEMENT, AND PERSONNEL .................................................... 8-1 Normal Day to Day Operations .............................................................................................................................. 8-3 Preventative Maintenance ...................................................................................................................................... 8-3 Field Engineering ................................................................................................................................................... 8-3 Water Quality Monitoring ...................................................................................................................................... 8-4 Emergency Response ............................................................................................................................................. 8-4 Cross-Connection Control Personnel ..................................................................................................................... 8-5 Implementation of the Improvement Program ....................................................................................................... 8-5 Budget Formulation ............................................................................................................................................... 8-5 Response to Complaints ......................................................................................................................................... 8-5 Public Press Contact............................................................................................................................................... 8-5 Billing .................................................................................................................................................................... 8-5 PERSONNEL CERTIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 8-6 SAFETY PROCEDURES ......................................................................................................................................... 8-6 ROUTINE SYSTEM OPERATION ......................................................................................................................... 8-7 Wells and Springs .................................................................................................................................................. 8-7 Pump Stations ........................................................................................................................................................ 8-7 Reservoirs .............................................................................................................................................................. 8-8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC v Meter Reading ........................................................................................................................................................ 8-8 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ..................................................................................................................................... 8-8 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE ....................................................................................................................... 8-9 Fire Hydrants ......................................................................................................................................................... 8-9 Meters 3 Inches and Larger .................................................................................................................................. 8-10 Water Mains/Dead-End Mains ............................................................................................................................. 8-10 Pump Stations ...................................................................................................................................................... 8-10 Storage Reservoirs ............................................................................................................................................... 8-10 Pressure Reducing Valves .................................................................................................................................... 8-10 Telemetry ............................................................................................................................................................. 8-10 Watershed Inspection ........................................................................................................................................... 8-11 Preventative Maintenance Schedule..................................................................................................................... 8-11 EQUIPMENT INVENTORY .................................................................................................................................. 8-15 Chemical Inventory .............................................................................................................................................. 8-15 WATER QUALITY MONITORING PROGRAM ................................................................................................. 8-15 Public Notification ............................................................................................................................................... 8-17 EMERGENCY RESPONSE ................................................................................................................................... 8-17 Water System Personnel Emergency Call-Up List .............................................................................................. 8-18 Notification Procedures ........................................................................................................................................ 8-18 Seismic Vulnerability Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 8-18 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ......................................................................................................................... 8-19 CONDITIONS OF SERVICE ................................................................................................................................. 8-19 Public Notifications.............................................................................................................................................. 8-20 CUSTOMER COMPLAINT RESPONSE PROGRAM .......................................................................................... 8-21 Complaint Response ............................................................................................................................................ 8-21 Procedures for Record Reporting to DOH ........................................................................................................... 8-22 RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING ............................................................................................................... 8-23 CHAPTER 9 – WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................................9-1 DESCRIPTION OF IMPROVEMENTS ....................................................................................................................9-1 Recent Water System Improvements ..................................................................................................................... 9-2 Water Main Improvements .................................................................................................................................... 9-3 Pressure Zone Improvements ................................................................................................................................. 9-7 Facility Improvements ........................................................................................................................................... 9-9 Miscellaneous Improvements............................................................................................................................... 9-14 ESTIMATING COSTS OF IMPROVEMENTS ......................................................................................................9-16 PRIORITIZING IMPROVEMENTS .......................................................................................................................9-17 Water Main Improvements .................................................................................................................................. 9-17 Other Improvements ............................................................................................................................................ 9-21 SCHEDULE OF IMPROVEMENTS .......................................................................................................................9-21 Future Project Cost Adjustments ......................................................................................................................... 9-22 CHAPTER 10 – FINANCIAL ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................................10-1 FISCAL RESPONSIBLITY .....................................................................................................................................10-1 FUNDING SOURCES .............................................................................................................................................10-1 FINANCING PLAN AND PAST PERFORMANCE ..............................................................................................10-4 TABLES Table ES-1 Supply Facilities Summary ................................................................................................................... ES-3 Table ES-2 Storage Facilities Summary .................................................................................................................. ES-4 Table ES-3 Booster Pump Station Facilities Summary ........................................................................................... ES-5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC vi Table ES-4 Water Main Diameter Inventory ........................................................................................................... ES-6 Table ES-5 Historical Water Supply ....................................................................................................................... ES-7 Table 1-1 Water System Ownership Information .......................................................................................................1-1 Table 1-2 2016 Water System Data ............................................................................................................................1-2 Table 1-3 Abbreviations .............................................................................................................................................1-6 Table 2-1 Supply Facilities Summary ........................................................................................................................2-7 Table 2-2 Booster Pump Station Facilities Summary ...............................................................................................2-12 Table 2-3 Storage Facilities Summary......................................................................................................................2-15 Table 2-4 Water Main Diameter Inventory ..............................................................................................................2-20 Table 2-5 Water Main Material Inventory ................................................................................................................2-21 Table 2-6 Water Main Installation Year Inventory ...................................................................................................2-22 Table 2-7 Pressure Reducing Valve Station Summary .............................................................................................2-24 Table 2-8 Regional RWSS Percent Ownership ........................................................................................................2-27 Table 2-9 Adjacent Systems .....................................................................................................................................2-29 Table 3-1 Land Use Inside Water Service Area .........................................................................................................3-6 Table 3-2 Population Trends within the City Limits ..................................................................................................3-7 Table 3-3 Water System Population and Employment Projections ............................................................................3-8 Table 4-1 Average Annual Metered Consumption and Service Connections .............................................................4-3 Table 4-2 Largest Water Users ...................................................................................................................................4-5 Table 4-3 Historical Water Supply .............................................................................................................................4-7 Table 4-4 Historical Supply by Source and System-wide Average Daily Demand ....................................................4-8 Table 4-5 2016 Demands by Pressure Zone .............................................................................................................4-10 Table 4-6 Existing Per Capita Demand ....................................................................................................................4-10 Table 4-7 Distribution System Leakage ...................................................................................................................4-11 Table 4-8 Average Annual Supply by Customer Class ............................................................................................4-12 Table 4-9A Equivalent Residential Units .................................................................................................................4-13 Table 4-9B Equivalent Residential Units .................................................................................................................4-14 Table 4-10 Maximum Day Demands and Peaking Factors ......................................................................................4-15 Table 4-11 General Planning-level Fire Flow Requirements ...................................................................................4-16 Table 4-12 Future Water Demand Projections .........................................................................................................4-17 Table 4-13 Future ERU Projections..........................................................................................................................4-18 Table 4-14 Future Water Demand Projections with Consideration for Climate Change ..........................................4-24 Table 6-1 Existing Water Rights and Interties ............................................................................................................6-8 Table 6-2 Existing Water Rights Evaluation ............................................................................................................6-20 Table 6-3 Future Water Rights Evaluation ...............................................................................................................6-21 Table 7-1 Minimum and Maximum Distribution System Static Pressures .................................................................7-2 Table 7-2 Water Source Capacity Evaluation .............................................................................................................7-4 Table 7-3 240 Zone Supply Evaluation ......................................................................................................................7-7 Table 7-4 354.5 Supply Evaluation ............................................................................................................................7-9 Table 7-5 529 Supply Evaluation .............................................................................................................................7-10 Table 7-6 575 Supply Evaluation .............................................................................................................................7-11 Table 7-7 587 Supply Evaluation .............................................................................................................................7-13 Table 7-8 416 Zone Supply Evaluation ....................................................................................................................7-15 Table 7-9 485 Zone (Open System) Supply Evaluation ...........................................................................................7-16 Table 7-10 485 Zone (Closed System) Supply Evaluation .......................................................................................7-17 Table 7-11 590 Zone Supply Evaluation ..................................................................................................................7-19 Table 7-12 640 Zone Supply Evaluation ..................................................................................................................7-20 Table 7-13 System-Wide Storage Evaluation ...........................................................................................................7-24 Table 7-14 240 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-25 Table 7-15 354.5 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ...............................................................................................7-26 Table 7-16 529 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-27 Table 7-17 587 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-28 Table 7-18 590 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-29 Table 7-19 640 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-30 Table 7-20 Combined 590 and 640 Zone Future Storage Capacity Evaluation ........................................................7-31 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC vii Table 7-21 485 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation ..................................................................................................7-32 Table 7-22 Pressure Zone Demand Allocation .........................................................................................................7-34 Table 7-23 Hydraulic Analyses Operational Conditions ..........................................................................................7-35 Table 7-24 Pressure Analysis Summary ...................................................................................................................7-39 Table 7-25 Large Structure Fire Flow Analysis Summary .......................................................................................7-41 Table 7-26 System Capacity Analysis ......................................................................................................................7-45 Table 8-1 Employee Certification...............................................................................................................................8-6 Table 8-2 Preventative Maintenance Schedule .........................................................................................................8-12 Table 8-3 Chemical Inventory ..................................................................................................................................8-15 Table 8-4 Water Treatment .......................................................................................................................................8-16 Table 8-5 Water Quality Analytical Laboratories (State of Washington Approved) ................................................8-17 Table 8-6 Preparation Common to All Emergencies ................................................................................................8-19 Table 8-7 Record Keeping and Reporting ................................................................................................................8-24 Table 9-1 Major Improvements Completed Since 2011 WSP ....................................................................................9-2 Table 9-2 Water Main Unit Costs .............................................................................................................................9-16 Table 9-3 Water Main Improvements Priority Ranking Criteria ..............................................................................9-18 Table 9-4 High Priority Distribution System Replacement Projects to Meet 2019 Design Criteria .........................9-20 Table 9-5 Proposed Improvements Implementation Schedule .................................................................................9-23 Table 10-1 Water System 2019 Rates.......................................................................................................................10-3 Table 10-2 Water Operating Fund Projections .........................................................................................................10-5 Table 10-3 Water Operating Fund History ...............................................................................................................10-6 CHARTS Chart ES-1 Future Water Demand and Supply Capacity ......................................................................................... ES-8 Chart ES-2 Future ERUs ......................................................................................................................................... ES-8 Chart ES-3 2016 Monthly Water Supply by Source ................................................................................................ ES-9 Chart ES-4 Existing and Future Water Main Age ................................................................................................. ES-12 Chart 3-1 Population and Employment Projections ....................................................................................................3-9 Chart 4-1 2016 Water Connections by Customer Class .............................................................................................4-4 Chart 4-2 2016 Water Consumption by Customer Class ............................................................................................4-4 Chart 4-3 2016 Monthly Consumption by Customer Class ........................................................................................4-6 Chart 4-4 Historical Monthly Water Supply ...............................................................................................................4-7 Chart 4-5 2016 Monthly Water Supply by Source .....................................................................................................4-8 Chart 4-6 Annual Water Supply by Source ................................................................................................................4-9 Chart 4-7 Future Water Demand and ERU Projections ............................................................................................4-19 Chart 4-8 City of Kent Supply and Sea-Tac International Airport Temperature (2011 through 2016) ....................4-22 Chart 4-9 City of Kent Supply and Sea-Tac International Airport Preceiptation 2011-2016 ...................................4-23 Chart 7-1 Future Water Supply and Demand Projections ...........................................................................................7-5 Chart 7-2 Hydraulic Model Calibration Results Summary .......................................................................................7-37 Chart 9-1 Approximate West Hill Reservoir Storage Component Elevations and Volumes ....................................9-11 Chart 9-2 Existing and Future Water Main Age .......................................................................................................9-22 FIGURES Figure 2-1 Existing Water System Figure 2-2 Existing System Hydraulic Profile Figure 2-3 Water Service Area and Adjacent Water Systems Figure 2-4 Emergency Interties Figure 3-1 Land Use Figure 7-1 Base Year (2016) PHD Pressures Figure 7-2 Base Year (2016) Fire Flow Availability Figure 7-3 Projected 20-Year Fire Flow Availability with City-Funded & High Priority Improvements Figure 7-4 Projected 20-Year Junctions Exceeding Fire Flow Requirement with City-Funded & High Priority Improvements Figure 8-1 City of Kent Water Department Organization Chart CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 09/30/19 11:53 AM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\KEN WSP TABLE OF CONTENTS.DOC viii Figure 9-1 Capital Improvement Projects 20-Year System-Wide Figure 9-2 Capital Improvement Projects West Hill Figure 9-3 Capital Improvement Projects 240 Zone – West Figure 9-4 Capital Improvement Projects 240 Zone – Downtown Figure 9-5 Capital Improvement Projects 240 Zone – North Figure 9-6 Capital Improvement Projects East Hill – North Figure 9-7 Capital Improvement Projects East Hill – South Figure 9-8 Proposed System Hydraulic Profile with 20-Year Improvements Figure 9-9 Water Main Projects System-Wide Figure 9-10 Water Main Projects West Hill Figure 9-11 Water Main Projects 240 Zone – West Figure 9-12 Water Main Projects 240 Zone – Downtown Figure 9-13 Water Main Projects 240 Zone – North Figure 9-14 Water Main Projects East Hill – North Figure 9-15 Water Main Projects East Hill – South Figure 9-16 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, System-Wide Figure 9-17 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, West Hill Figure 9-18 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, 240 Zone – West Figure 9-19 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, 240 Zone – Downtown Figure 9-20 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, 240 Zone – North Figure 9-21 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, East Hill – North Figure 9-22 Capital Improvement Projects All Projects, East Hill – South Appendix L Existing Node Diagram Overview Map Appendix L Existing Node Diagram Mapbook APPENDICES Appendix A – Water Facilities Inventory (WFI) Form Appendix B – Retail Water Service Area and Other Agreements Appendix C – Consistency Statement Checklists Appendix D – SEPA Checklist Appendix E – Water Use Efficiency Program Appendix F – Cross-Connection Control Program Appendix G – Water System Construction Standards Appendix H – Water Rights Information Appendix I – Water Quality Monitoring Plan/Coliform Monitoring Plan/Stage 2 DDBP Monitoring Plan/E. Coli Response Plan Appendix J – Wellhead Protection Program Appendix K – Consumer Confidence Report Appendix L – Hydraulic Model Node Diagram Appendix M – Water Ordinances Appendix N – Agency Review Comments Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-1 ES | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PURPOSE OF THE WATER SYSTEM PLAN The City of Kent’s (City) water system is a major infrastructure, much of which is invisible to the customers that receive its water. The water system requires qualified staff to operate and maintain an ongoing capital improvement program to replace old components to meet the requirements mandated by federal and state laws. The primary purpose of the City of Kent Water System Plan (WSP) is to identify and schedule water system improvements that correct existing system deficiencies and ensure a safe and reliable supply of water to current and future customers. This WSP complies with Washington State Department of Health (DOH) regulations under Chapter 246-290 Washington Administrative Code (WAC), which requires water purveyors to update their water system plans every 10 years. This WSP has been written to meet 10-year planning requirements. The City’s previous WSP was prepared in 2011. This updated 2019 WSP reflects King County’s (County) population allocation to the City and the City’s current Urban Growth Area (UGA), which are consistent with the City’s 2015 Comprehensive Plan and the County’s 2018 Comprehensive Plan updates. The WSP also reflects improvements and changes to the water system since the completion of the 2011 WSP. SUMMARY OF KEY ELEMENTS This WSP presents a description of the existing water system and service area, a forecast of future water demands, policies and design criteria for water system operation and improvements, the operations and maintenance program, staffing requirements, a schedule of improvements, and a financial plan to accomplish the improvements. The WSP also includes several ancillary elements that include a water use efficiency program, a water quality monitoring plan, a wellhead protection program, and a cross-connection control program. A summary of the key issues related to these elements is provided in the following sections. WATER SERVICE AREA In 2016, the City provided water service to approximately 68,157 people throughout its water service area boundary, which extends beyond the City’s corporate limits to include small areas of Auburn, Tukwila, and unincorporated King County. The City is responsible for providing public water service, utility management, and water system development within this area. The City will provide new water service within the City limits and designated retail water service area (i.e., where there are existing water mains). Requests for new water service outside of the City limits but within the UGA, where there are no existing water mains fronting the property, will only be granted upon extension of water service and completion of an annexation agreement. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) In 2016, the City provided water service to an average of 14,907 connections, which were mainly comprised of single-family connections. Single-family connections represent approximately 74 percent of all accounts, but the single-family class only consumed 24 percent of all water supplied to the system in 2016. EXISTING WATER SYSTEM The City’s water system initially dates to the latter part of the nineteenth century, when a spring was tapped on the East Hill to provide water to the Kent Water and Light Company. The City purchased the water system in 1892. In 1926, the City purchased the Kent Springs water source, and began developing the Clark Springs source in the 1930s. In the 2000s, the City partnered in the Tacoma Regional Water Supply System, which became the City’s third primary water source. The City has ten additional well sources; however, these wells are typically only used periodically to ensure they are regularly exercised due to the higher operation costs. A summary of the City’s supply sources is shown in Table ES-1. 2014 Water Connections 2016 Water Connections 2016 Water Consumption CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-3 Table ES-1 Supply Facilities Summary Facility Type Supplies Water To Year Installed Use Existing Capacity (gpm) Water Treatment Generator 208th Street/ 212th Street Wellfield 4 wells 240 Zone 1982, 2001 Active 3,500 Chlorination, Fluoridation, Manganese/Iron/Hydrogen Sulfide Removal, pH Adjustment 208th: None 212th: Hookup for portable generator Armstrong Springs Wells 2 wells CSTM/ KSTM 1982 Active 1,050 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site Clark Springs Infiltration gallery and collector, 3 wells CSTM 1957, 1969 Active 5,400 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site generator partially powers facility East Hill Well 1 well 590 Zone 1979 Active 1,900 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site Garrison Creek Well 1 well 240 Zone 1981 Active 500 Chlorination, Fluoridation On-site generator for SCADA system only Kent Springs Infiltration gallery, 3 wells KSTM 1908, 1977, 2001 Active 3,680 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site generator O'Brien Well 1 well 240 Zone 1951 Active 243 Chlorination, Fluoridation None on-site, towed generator is used Seven Oaks Well 1 well CSTM/ KSTM 1982 Active 350 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment None Tacoma RWWS Intertie KSTM/ 590 Zone 2005 Active 8,778 Chlorination, Fluoridation, Filtration, Ozone Treatment, pH Adjustment1 Site has full backup power 1 = pH adjustment occurs in Tacoma system and when RWSS water is directed through the KSTM to the Guiberson Reservoir. The City’s water system has nine storage facilities that provide storage directly to various zones in the system. Details of the City’s storage facilities are shown in Table ES-2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) Table ES-2 Storage Facilities Summary Reservoir Approximate Location Pressure Zone Year Constructed Construction Type Capacity (MG) Diameter (feet) Base Elev. (feet) Overflow Elev. (feet) 6 Million Gallon #2 Reservoir Garrison Creek Park 240 Zone 1969 Reinforced concrete below grade 6 Variable 212 240 Guiberson Reservoir E Guiberson St and Kensington Ave S 240 Zone Late 1930s Reinforced concrete below grade 3 Variable 222 240 Reith Road Standpipe Reith Rd S, just north of W Fenwick Park 354.5 Zone 1959 Steel 1.0 66 315.0 354.5 6 Million Gallon #1 Reservoir 98th Ave S and S 239th Pl 416 Zone 1967 Steel 6.0 146 370.0 418.0 125K Tank 98th Ave S and S 239th Pl 485 Zone 1958 Elevated steel 0.125 32 462.0 1 485.0 Cambridge Tank S 264th St and Military Rd S 529 Zone 1959 Elevated steel 0.3 53.33 499.1 2 529.0 3.5 MG Tank 124th Ave SE and SE 286th Pl 590 Zone 1978 Steel 3.5 74 483.4 592.9 640 Tank SE 248th St and 124th Ave SE 590 Zone (Future: 640 Zone) 2011 Steel 4.0 75 523.0 595.0 (Future: 645.0) Blue Boy Standpipe 112th Ave SE and SE 246th Pl 590 Zone 1965 Steel 0.97 42 499.7 593.8 1 = Ground elevation 386.8 feet. 2 = Ground elevation 441 feet. The City’s water system has six booster pump station facilities that provide supply to the 354.5 Zone, 485 Zone, 529 Zone, 575 Zone, 587 Zone, and 590 Zone. A summary of the City’s pumping facilities is shown in Table ES-3. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-5 Table ES-3 Booster Pump Station Facilities Summary Pump Station Suction Pressure Zone Discharge Pressure Zone Year Constructed Existing Pumping Capacity (gpm) Number of Pumps Pump Type Pump Motor Size (HP)Generator Pump Station #3 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 1959 1,800 2 Horizontal split case (2) 50 On-site Pump Station #4 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 1959 3,800 3 Horizontal split case (2) 75 (1) 150 On-site Pump Station #5 416 Zone 485 and 590 Zones 1975 6,350 4 Horizontal split case (2) 125, (1) 40, (1) 40/125 On-site Pump Station #6 529 Zone 587 Zone 1984 1,200 3 Vertical turbine (3) 20 Has hookup for portable generator Pump Station #7 529 Zone 575 Zone 1985 500 2 Horizontal (2) 10 On-site Pump Station #8 Highline Water District 560 Zone 587 Zone 1986 1,200 3 Vertical turbine (3) 20 Has hookup for portable generator The City’s water system contains 284 miles of water main ranging in size from 1 inch to 36 inches in diameter. As shown in Table ES-4, most of the water main (approximately 85 percent) within the system is 12 inches in diameter or less. The remaining 15 percent of the water main is 14 inches in diameter or larger. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) Table ES-4 Water Main Diameter Inventory Diameter (Inches) Length (Feet) % of Total 4 or smaller 24,139 1.6% 6 251,772 16.8% 8 567,492 37.8% 10 204,265 13.6% 12 232,958 15.5% 14 579 0.0% 16 76,769 5.1% 18 25,118 1.7% 20 2,817 0.2% 21 37,316 2.5% 24 54,154 3.6% 30 or larger 21,626 1.4% Unknown 1,203 0.1% Total 1,500,208 100% PAST WATER USAGE In general, the amount of water consumed by the City’s customers has increased approximately 13 percent since the year 2011. This is most likely the result of the 700 new service connections added to the system and the increased usage of water per connection of both commercial and multi-family residential customer classes. During this time, the average water use of single-family residential customers has remained relatively steady, at an average of 157 gallons per day per connection. Table ES-5 lists the total amount of water supplied to the system from 2011 through 2016. 4" or smaller 6" 8" 10" 12" 14"16" 18" 20" 21"24" 30" or larger Unknown CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-7 Table ES-5 Historical Water Supply Year Annual Supply (gallons) 2011 2,498,178,000 2012 2,566,823,000 2013 2,593,245,000 2014 2,659,170,000 2015 2,811,692,000 2016 2,818,790,000 FUTURE WATER DEMANDS AND WATER SUPPLY Overall water demand within the City’s system is expected to increase by approximately 14 percent of 2016 demand by the end of the 20-year planning period, without savings from the City’s Water Use Efficiency program. The projected water demand and supply capacity data is shown graphically in Chart ES-1. The existing and projected ERU data is shown graphically in Chart ES-2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) Chart ES-1 Future Water Demand and Supply Capacity 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 MDD and Supply (gpm)Year MDD without WUE MDD with WUE Supply 2018 (Base Year) 2028 (+10 Years) 2038 (+20 Years) Chart ES-2 Future ERUs 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 Equivalent Residential Units (ERUs)Year Equivalent Residential Units 2018 (Base Year) 2028 (+10 Years) 2038 (+20 Years) CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-9 WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Water supply in the City’s system is supplied predominantly from Kent Springs, Clark Springs, and the Tacoma Regional Water Supply System as shown in Chart ES-3. Water also can be supplied by ten other groundwater wells. The 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield consists of four wells, two wells are located at the Armstrong Springs site, and one well is located at each of the East Hill Well, Garrison Creek Well, O’Brien Well and Seven Oaks Well sites. As shown in Chart ES-1, the City’s water sources have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and projected needs of the water system through the 20-year planning period. Chart ES-3 2016 Monthly Water Supply by Source 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Monthly Supply Volume (million gallons)Clark Springs Kent Springs East Hill Well Armstrong Springs Wells Garrison Creek Well 212th St. Treatment Plant SSP Connection #1 (240 Zone)SSP Connection #3 (590 Zone) Water from all the City’s sources are chlorinated and fluoridated. In addition, aeration and sodium hydroxide pH adjustment are used at the Guiberson Reservoir site to treat blended Kent Springs and Tacoma water. The City also uses pH adjustment at the 212th Street Treatment Plant, Pump Station #5, and the East Hill Well. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE The City’s operations and maintenance organization is staffed by well qualified, technically trained personnel. City staff regularly participate in safety and technical seminars to keep abreast of the latest changes in the water industry and ensure a smooth and safe operation of the water system. The current staff of supervisory personnel and field crew, in which many are responsible for the water system and other utilities, have effectively operated and maintained the water EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) system in the past. As the water system expands in the future and continues to age, additional staff will also be required. The City plans to add staff to meet the increased requirements from system expansion as the budget allows. The City has taken several steps to prepare for emergency situations. A vulnerability assessment and City-Wide Emergency Response Plans have been prepared that conform to the requirements of the Bioterrorism Act of 2002. The documents contain a vulnerability assessment of the City’s water system facilities, a contingency operation plan for responding to emergency events, a list of water personnel responsible for making decisions in emergency situations, and other elements. Additionally, a seismic vulnerability assessment was completed in 2017 that identifies the City’s risk to seismic hazards and recommends mitigation to reduce the risk of failure due to those hazards. Results of the assessment were considered in the development of the water system capital improvement program. The Water Department also participated in a SCADA system vulnerability assessment with the City’s IT Department and the Department of Homeland Security in 2017 and 2018. The recommendations from the assessment are being implemented by the City. WATER SYSTEM EVALUATION The existing water system was evaluated to determine its ability to meet the policies and design criteria of the City and those mandated by DOH. The results of the evaluation are summarized below. • The City has sufficient water source capacity to meet the demands of existing and future customers until at least 2038. • The O’Brien Well is not normally operated because sand is present inside the well screen and high levels of manganese are present in the groundwater. Improvements to provide 480-volt power to the site, redevelop the well, and provide treatment are included in Chapter 9. • The City has sufficient water storage capacity to meet the demands of the existing and future customers until at least 2038. • A new 587 Zone reservoir will be constructed by 2028 to provide redundancy in the West Hill operating area. The reservoir will be accompanied by a new BPS that will provide an additional 1,000 gpm of firm capacity to the West Hill operating area. The existing pump stations on the West Hill will be equipped with new PRVs to facilitate these operational changes in the service area. • The Guiberson Reservoir was constructed in the 1930s, is nearing the end of its useful life and is in need of replacement. • The easterly portion of the City’s existing 590 Zone will be converted to a 640 Zone to resolve storage deficiencies in the 590 Zone and moderately low pressures in the conversion area. • The 575 Zone will be converted to the 587 Zone to improve the level of service to the 575 Zone. • Several areas of the system require water main replacements to resolve deficiencies related to high water velocities, aging water main, and undesirable materials. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) ES-11 PROPOSED WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS AND FINANCING PLAN Improvements to the water system are necessary, primarily to resolve existing system deficiencies, but also to accommodate the increase in water demands from future growth. Improvements identified for the first 5 years of the capital improvement program (2019 through 2023) are estimated to cost approximately $36,346,000, which results in an average expenditure of approximately $7,269,200 per year. Improvements in the following 5 years (2024 through 2028) are estimated to cost approximately $30,000,000, or approximately $6,000,000 per year. The financial analysis is intended to illustrate the feasibility of funding the capital and non-capital improvements for the water system in the next 10 years. It is anticipated that projects identified in this WSP will be financed from cash on hand. The combination of the historical financial data presented in Chapter 10, in conjunction with the financial plan for future revenues and expenditures, demonstrate the financial viability of the City’s Water Utility. The funding for capital improvements in this WSP is balanced. However, the City recognizes that the economy and other factors can change the needs of the water system. In 2016, the city completed a water rate study and adopted a new rate structure for the water utility that addressed the operating and capital needs for the system. The current rate structure adopted a fund balance reserve policy that requires 20 percent of operating expenses balance that would be available for emergency situations. The City anticipates beginning another rate study in 2020 to be completed in 2022. As the existing infrastructure continues to age, managing and funding the water system CIP is essential to maintaining a safe and reliable water supply for the City’s customers. Based on the existing level of repair and replacement identified by the City for the water system CIP, the amount of water main in the system that is greater than 65 years old will increase from 2 percent to 19 percent by the end of the 20-year planning period, as shown in Chart ES-4. As funding becomes available, the City should consider a more aggressive water main repair and replacement program or continue to develop asset management strategies to address future infrastructure needs. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN ES-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-EXECSUM.DOC (9/30/2019 11:30 AM) Chart ES-4 Existing and Future Water Main Age Existing Water Main Age Water Main Age with 2019 to 2038 Improvements Less than 25 Years Old 25 to 55 Years Old 55 to 65 Years Old 65 to 75 Years Old Greater than 75 Years Old Unknown 23% 54% 12% 2% 0% 9%15% 41%18% 13% 6% 7% Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) 1-1 1 | INTRODUCTION WATER SYSTEM OWNERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT The City of Kent (City) is a municipal corporation that owns and operates a public water system that covers the majority of its corporate boundaries and some areas outside the City’s corporate boundaries. Water system data on file at the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) for the City’s system is shown in Table 1-1. Table 1-1 Water System Ownership Information OVERVIEW OF EXISTING SYSTEM In 2016, the City provided water service to an average of approximately 14,907 customer connections, or 44,854 equivalent residential units (ERUs), within the City’s water service area. The City limits comprise an area of approximately 34.4 square miles, and the existing retail water service area is approximately 23.7 square miles. The 2016 population served by the water system was approximately 68,157, whereas the population residing in the City limits was approximately 124,500. Other areas within the City limits are within the water service areas of the City of Renton, Highline Water District, Soos Creek Water and Sewer District, and Lake Meridian Water District. The City’s water supply is currently provided by 16 wells, 2 springs, and an intertie connection with the City of Tacoma (Tacoma). All City sources are chlorinated and fluoridated. The 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield is also treated for manganese, iron, and hydrogen sulfide removal. Water from the 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield, Armstrong Springs Wells, Clark Springs, East Hill Well, Kent Springs, Seven Oaks Well, and the Tacoma intertie are treated for pH adjustment. Water from the Tacoma intertie also receives filtration and ozone treatment in Tacoma’s system. The City is a partner with Tacoma, Lakehaven Water and Sewer District, and Covington Water District on the Second Supply Pipeline source. Water storage is provided by 9 reservoirs that have a total capacity of approximately 24.9 million gallons (MG). In addition, the City’s water system has 13 pressure zones, with 18 pressure reducing stations. The system Information Type Description System Type Group A - Community - Public Water System System Name Kent Water Department County King DOH System ID Number 381501 Owner Number 002950 Address 220 4th Avenue S, Kent, WA 98032 Contact Mr. Sean Bauer, Water System Manager Contact Phone Number (253) 856-5610 CHAPTER 1 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 1-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) also has 6 booster pump stations and approximately 284 miles of water main. A summary of the 2016 water system data is shown in Table 1-2. Table 1-2 2016 Water System Data AUTHORIZATION AND PURPOSE The City authorized RH2 Engineering, Inc., (RH2) to prepare this Water System Plan (WSP) as required by state law under Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-100. In accordance with WAC 246-290-100, the WSP shall be updated and submitted to DOH every 10 years. This WSP has been written to meet 10-year planning requirements. The previous WSP was prepared for the City in 2011. The purpose of this updated WSP is as follows: • To evaluate existing water demand data and project future water demands; • To analyze the existing water system to determine if it meets minimum requirements mandated by DOH and the City’s own policies and design criteria; • To identify water system improvements that resolve existing system deficiencies and accommodate the system’s future needs for at least 20 years into the future; • To prepare a schedule of improvements that meets the goals of the City’s financial program; Description Data Water Service Population 68,157 Water Service Area 23.7 square miles Total Connections 14,907 Total ERUs 44,854 Demand per ERU 172 gallons per day Average Day Demand 5,348 gpm Distribution System Leakage 6.0% Maximum Day/Average Day Demand Factor 2.17 Peak Hour/Maximum Day Demand Factor 1.46 Number of Pressure Zones 13 Number of Wells 16 Number of Spring Sources 2 Total Capacity of City Sources 16,623 gpm Tacoma Intertie Capacity 8,778 gpm Number of Pump Stations and Total Capacity 6 (15,505 gpm) Number of Reservoirs and Total Capacity 9 (24.9 MG) Number of Pressure Reducing Stations 18 Total Length of Water Main 284 miles CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN INTRODUCTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) 1-3 • To document the City’s existing water rights, their current status, and future requirements; • To evaluate past water quality and identify water quality improvements, as necessary; • To document the City’s operations and maintenance program; • To prepare water use efficiency, cross-connection control, wellhead protection, and water quality monitoring plans; and • To comply with all other WSP requirements of DOH. SUMMARY OF WSP CONTENTS A brief summary of the content of the chapters in the WSP is as follows. • The Executive Summary provides a brief summary of the key elements of this WSP. • Chapter 1 introduces the reader to the City’s water system, the objectives of the WSP, and its organization. • Chapter 2 presents the water service area, describes the existing water system, and identifies adjacent water purveyors. • Chapter 3 presents related plans, land use, and population characteristics. • Chapter 4 identifies existing water demands and projected future demands. • Chapter 5 presents the City’s operational policies and design criteria. • Chapter 6 discusses the City’s water source, water rights, and water quality monitoring. • Chapter 7 discusses the water system analyses and existing system deficiencies. • Chapter 8 discusses the City’s operations and maintenance program. • Chapter 9 presents the proposed water system improvements, and their estimated costs and implementation schedule. • Chapter 10 summarizes the financial status of the water system and presents a plan for funding the water system improvements. • The Appendices contain additional information and plans that supplement the main chapters of the WSP. DEFINITION OF TERMS The following terms are used throughout this WSP. Capital Facilities Charge: A one-time fee paid by a property owner when connecting to the City’s water system. This fee pays for a new customer’s equitable share of the cost of the existing system. This fee offsets the costs of providing water to new customers and recognizes that the existing water system was largely built and paid for by the existing customers. Consumption: The true volume of water used by the water system’s customers. The volume is measured at each customer's connection to the distribution system. CHAPTER 1 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 1-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) Connection Charge: A one-time fee paid by a property owner when connecting to the City’s system that is made up of both the Capital Facilities Charge and the Meter Installation Charge. Cross Connection: A physical arrangement that connects a public water system, directly or indirectly, with facilities that could present the potential for contaminating the public water system. Demand: The quantity of water required from a water supply source over a period of time to meet the needs of domestic, commercial, industrial, and public uses, and provide enough water to supply firefighting, system losses, and miscellaneous water uses. Demands are normally discussed in terms of flow rate, such as million gallons per day (MGD) or gallons per minute (gpm), and are described in terms of a volume of water delivered during a certain time period. Flow rates pertinent to the analysis and design of water systems are as follows. • Average Day Demand (ADD): The total amount of water delivered to the system in a year divided by the number of days in the year. • Maximum Day Demand (MDD): The maximum amount of water delivered to the system during a 24-hour time period of a given year. • Peak Hour Demand (PHD): The maximum amount of water delivered to the system, excluding fire flow, during a 1-hour time period of a given year. A system’s peak hour demand usually occurs during the same day as the MDD. Distribution System Leakage (DSL): Water that is measured as going into the distribution system but not metered as going out of the system. Equivalent Residential Units (ERUs): One ERU represents the amount of water used by one single-family residence for a specific water system. The demand of other customer classes can be expressed in terms of ERUs by dividing the demand of each of the other customer classes by the demand represented by one ERU. Fire Flow: The rate of flow of water required during firefighting, which is usually expressed in terms of gpm. Head: A measure of pressure or force exerted by water. Head is measured in feet and can be converted to pounds per square inch (psi) by dividing feet by 2.31. Head Loss: Pressure reduction resulting from pipeline wall friction, bends, physical restrictions, or obstructions. Hydraulic Elevation: The height of a free water surface above a defined datum; the height above the ground to which water in a pressure pipeline would rise in a vertical open-end pipe. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The maximum permissible level of contaminant in the water that the purveyor delivers to any public water system user, measured at the locations identified under WAC 246-290-300, Table 3. Meter Installation Charge: The installation charge or hook-up fee that is paid by a property owner to reimburse the City for the cost incurred to make the physical connection to the water system. This cost includes both direct and indirect costs for installing the service line off the system’s water main up to and including the City-owned water meter and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) equipment. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN INTRODUCTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) 1-5 Potable: Water suitable for human consumption. Pressure Zone: A portion of the water system that operates from sources at a common hydraulic elevation. For example, the 240 Zone refers to the City’s lower pressure zone, which has a reservoir with an overflow elevation of 240 feet. Purveyor: An agency, subdivision of the state, municipal corporation, firm, company, mutual or cooperative association, institution, partnership, or persons or other entity owning or operating a public water system. Purveyor also means the authorized agents of such entities. Supply: Water that is delivered to a water system by one or more supply facilities, which may consist of supply stations, booster pump stations, springs, and wells. Storage: Water that is “stored” in a reservoir to supplement the supply facilities of a system and provide water supply for emergency conditions. Storage is broken down into the following five components, which are defined and discussed in more detail in Chapter 7: operational storage, equalizing storage, standby storage, fire flow storage, and dead storage. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS The abbreviations listed in Table 1-3 are used throughout this WSP. CHAPTER 1 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 1-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH1.DOCX (9/30/2019 11:56 AM) Table 1-3 Abbreviations Abbreviation Description ADD Average Day Demand AMI Advanced Metering Infrastructure AWWA American Water Works Association CCR Consumer Confidence Report CIP Capital Improvement Program City City of Kent County King County CWD Covington Water District CWSP Coordinated Water System Plan CWSSA Critical Water Supply Service Area DBP Disinfection Byproduct DOH Washington State Department of Health DSL Distribution System Leakage EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ERU Equivalent Residential Unit fps feet per second GMA Growth Management Act gpm gallons per minute HWD Highline Water District JOA Joint Operating Agreement LMWD Lake Meridian Water District LWSD Lakehaven Water and Sewer District MCL Maximum Contaminant Level MCLG Maximum Contaminant Level Goal MDD Maximum Day Demand MG Million Gallons MGD Million Gallons per Day mg/L milligrams per Liter OFM Office of Financial Management OSHA Occupational Safety & Health Administration PHD Peak Hour Demand psi pounds per square inch RCW Revised Code of Washington SCWSD Soos Creek Water and Sewer District SDWA Safe Drinking Water Act SEPA State Environmental Policy Act SOC Synthetic Organic Chemical SWTR Surface Water Treatment Rule Tacoma City of Tacoma (Tacoma Public Utilities) THM Trihalomethane UGA Urban Growth Area USGS United States Geological Survey VOC Volatile Organic Chemical WAC Washington Administrative Code WISHA Washington Industrial Safety & Health Act WSP Water System Plan WUCC Water Utility Coordinating Committee WUE Water Use Efficiency Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-1 2 | WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION This chapter describes the City of Kent’s (City) retail water service area and water service agreements, and provides a thorough description of the water system and its individual components. The results of the evaluation and analyses of the existing water system are presented in Chapter 7. WATER SERVICE AREA HISTORY The City was incorporated in 1890. The water system’s origins date to the latter part of the nineteenth century, when a spring was tapped on the East Hill to provide water to the Kent Water and Light Company. In 1891, the City granted a 25-year franchise to the Farmers Water Company and the Kent Water and Light Company to furnish water to the City. The City retained the option to purchase the water system, which it did one year later in 1892. In 1892, the City financed the construction of a reservoir at the top of Kennebeck Street. Further improvements were made to the water system in 1910. In 1926, the City purchased the Kent Springs water source and began construction of the original Kent Springs Transmission Main 4 years later. In the 1930s, development of the Clark Springs source began and the Guiberson Reservoir was constructed. In the 1950s, Pump Station #3 and Pump Station #4 were constructed to pump water to the Cambridge Tank and the Reith Road Standpipe on the West Hill to provide service to this area. The 125K Tank was also added near 98th Avenue South and South 239th Place. The City adopted its first Water System Plan (WSP) in 1955. The 1960s saw the construction of the 6 Million Gallon (MG) #1 Reservoir, 6 MG #2 Reservoir, and Blue Boy Standpipe, as well as the completion of the transmission main from Clark Springs, which provided the City with redundant spring water sources and transmission mains. In the 1970s, the 3.5 million-gallon (MG) Tank and Pump Station #5 were constructed. The East Hill Well was developed, the City of Renton (Renton) and City of Tukwila (Tukwila) interties were constructed, and the South 212th Street and South 208th Street wells were drilled. Chlorination was also added to Kent Springs. In the 1980s, Pump Station #6 and Pump Station #7 were constructed to improve the level of service on the West Hill. Pump Station #8 also was constructed to provide an intertie with the Highline Water District (HWD). The Garrison Creek Well, Armstrong Springs Wells, and Seven Oaks Well also were developed to provide additional supply. Fluoridation was added to Clark Springs. The City became a member of the South King County Critical Water Supply Service Area (SKCCWSSA) to coordinate water planning efforts and began the process of obtaining additional supply from the City of Tacoma (Tacoma). In the 1990s, the South 212th Street Iron and Manganese Treatment Facility was completed, and the City’s first Water Conservation Plan was adopted. As a member of the SKCCWSSA, the CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) City participated in the development and adoption of the South King County Coordinated Water System Plan (CWSP). In addition, major transmission and distribution pipeline improvements were completed, and the Infrastructure Maintenance Management and Inventory System was brought online to assist with planned maintenance. Lead and Copper Rule treatment and siting studies were accomplished in accordance with Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requirements, and seismic evaluations and upgrades were completed on the City’s reservoirs and other distribution system infrastructure. In the 2000s, the Tacoma Regional Water Supply System (RWSS) became the City’s third primary water source. The City partnered with Tacoma, Covington Water District (CWD), and Lakehaven Water and Sewer District (LWSD) on this project and in doing so, added 12.64 million gallons per day (MGD) to the City’s available supply. Seismic, security, and redundancy upgrades were also made to many of the City’s facilities. In the 2010s, the 640 Tank and additional upgrades were constructed in preparation for the creation of the new 640 Pressure Zone. The Guiberson Corrosion Control Facility was constructed, and additional seismic, security, and redundancy upgrades also have been constructed throughout the system. RETAIL WATER SERVICE AREA The City’s retail water service area, which covers an area of approximately 23.7 square miles, is shown on Figure 2-1. The existing service area is predominantly contained within the City’s incorporated boundaries, but also includes areas of the City of Auburn (Auburn), and unincorporated King County. The existing service area is approximately bordered by Interstate 5 (I-5) to the west, SE 304th Street to the south, S 180th Street to the north, and 128th Avenue SE to the east. Along the north-south axis of the system, the retail water service area is approximately 7.6 miles long. Along the east-west axis, the existing retail water service area is approximately 5.7 miles wide. The City will provide water service throughout the existing retail water service area in accordance with the Municipal Water Law’s duty to provide service requirements. The existing retail water service area defines the place of use for each water right held by the City for municipal water supply purposes. The place of use can be updated through subsequent water system planning or engineering document submittals that are approved by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH). Along with the existing retail water service area, Kent’s city limits, neighboring city limits, the King County urban growth area (UGA) boundary, and Kent’s Potential Annexation Areas (PAAs) are shown in Figure 2-1. TOPOGRAPHY The topography of the existing service area is lowest in the valley (20 feet) at the center of the city that runs north and south (Green River Valley), with the highest elevations on the east and west hillsides of the City, respectively called East Hill and West Hill. The highest existing service elevations are located on East Hill, at approximately 500 feet. The majority of the existing system is located within the Green River watershed. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-3 GEOLOGY1 The City is located in the southeastern part of the Puget Sound Lowland, which is a topographically low region between the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade Range. This area has been subjected to repeat episodes of advancing and retreating continental glaciation, as well as the deposition of sediment from rivers and streams flowing from the Cascade Range during periods when the continental glaciers were not present. The City’s service area includes topographic uplands to the east (Covington Upland) and west (Des Moines Upland) flanking a wide, flat-bottomed north-south trending valley (Green River Valley). Downtown Kent is located on the eastern edge of the Green River Valley. Bedrock, consisting primarily of sedimentary rock such as sandstone, siltstone, shale, and coal, is found below an elevation of approximately 400 feet below sea level beneath Downtown Kent. Bedrock crops out, or is found closer to ground surface, farther to the north and east of the City. Above the bedrock are unconsolidated sediments that have been deposited during glacial and non-glacial periods over the past several hundred thousand years. Glacial sequences typically consist of advance outwash (sand), glacial till (unsorted mixture of silt, sand, and gravel), and recessional outwash (sand and gravel). Non-glacial sequences are typically alluvial (layered silt, sand, and gravel) and lacustrine (clay and silt) in nature. The glacial sequences that have been named in this area include the Double Bluffs Glaciation (greater than 100,000 years old), the Possession Glaciation (80,000 to 60,000 years old), and the Vashon Glaciation (23,000 to 10,000 years old). The non-glacial deposits include the Whidbey Interglaciation (100,000 to 80,000 years old), the Olympia Interglaciation (60,000 to 23,000 years old), and the Holocene age sediments (10,000 years old to present). The upland areas (Des Moines Upland and Covington Upland) are glaciated drift plains that were shaped by the Vashon Glaciation. The most prevalent geologic unit at the ground surface on the drift plains are Vashon Glacial Till, which was laid down beneath the most recent continental glacier. The glaciated drift plains contain oblong north-south orientated hills and depressions created by the advance and retreat of the Vashon continental glacier over the area. In various locations the recessional outwash was deposited preferentially in the depressions; in other areas the recessional outwash streams incised into the glacial till and formed thicker recessional outwash channels. The alluvial deposits on the uplands are typically very thin, whereas the alluvial deposits beneath the Green River Valley can be hundreds of feet thick. All sediments older than the Vashon recessional outwash have been overridden by a glacier and compacted. This compaction means that those sediments more easily support foundations. Liquefaction susceptibility of these sediments, as presented by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, range from very low to moderate. The Vashon recessional outwash deposits have low liquefaction susceptibility. The recent alluvium deposits can be loose and, where saturated, can be susceptible to liquefaction, which has implications for infrastructure. All alluvial deposits in the Green River Valley have medium to high liquefaction susceptibility. Groundwater recharge to the City’s sources primarily originates as precipitation. Groundwater flows both laterally (east to west) and vertically downward under the uplands, which are the 1 Reference: Woodward, D.G., Packard, F.A., Dion, N.P., and Sumioka, S.S. 1995. Occurrence and Quality of Ground Water in Southwestern King County, Washington. U.S. Geological Survey. Water-Resources Investigations Report 92-4098. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) recharge areas. Groundwater flow beneath the Green River Valley is generally downstream (north) and vertically upward since this is a regional discharge area. The City’s spring sources are primarily situated at locations where the Vashon recessional outwash aquifer, or older adjacent aquifers, are pinched or constricted, which forces the water to discharge from the aquifer. INVENTORY OF EXISTING WATER FACILITIES This section provides a detailed description of the existing water system and the current operation of the facilities. The analysis of the existing water facilities is presented in Chapter 7. Additional information on the City’s existing water system facilities is included on DOH Water Facilities Inventory (WFI) form in Appendix A. PRESSURE ZONES The City serves customers within an elevation range from 20 feet above sea level in the valley running north and south through the middle of the system to approximately 500 feet above sea level on the east side of the system, also referred to as East Hill. This wide elevation range requires that the water pressure be increased or reduced to maintain pressures that are safe and sufficient to meet the flow requirements of the system. The City achieves this by dividing the water system into 13 different pressure zones, as shown in Figure 2-1. The pressure in each zone is regulated by reservoir levels, pressure reducing station settings and other control valve settings, pump settings, or a combination of these, as illustrated in the hydraulic profile (Figure 2-2). Central Valley 240 Pressure Zone The 240 Zone is the largest pressure zone in the City, serving the lowest elevations in the valley between the East Hill and West Hill. The Kent Springs Transmission Main (KSTM) terminates at the 240 Zone’s Guiberson Reservoir, and can provide water to the zone from Kent Springs, the Armstrong Springs Wells, the Seven Oaks Well, and Tacoma. The zone also can be supplied directly with water from the O’Brien Well, the 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield, and the Garrison Creek Well. Pressures in the 240 Zone are established by the 6 MG #2 Reservoir and the Guiberson Reservoir. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 20 feet and 135 feet. There also are interties with Tacoma, Tukwila, Auburn, and Renton connected to the 240 Zone. East Hill 271 Alvord Pressure Zone The 271 Alvord Zone is supplied by one pressure reducing station from the 485 Zone that establishes pressures in the zone. This pressure zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 60 feet and 170 feet, and is located near the base of the East Hill, just north of Mill Creek, primarily between Alvord Avenue N and Hazel Avenue. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-5 308 Hilltop Pressure Zone The 308 Hilltop Zone is a very small zone supplied by one pressure reducing station from the 485 Zone that establishes pressures in the zone. This pressure zone currently serves customers within an elevation range of 120 feet and 130 feet. This pressure zone also is located near the base of the East Hill and only provides water to customers along 91st Avenue South. 339 Seattle Pressure Zone Water is supplied to the 339 Seattle Zone by one pressure reducing station from the 485 Zone that establishes pressures within the zone. The 339 Seattle Zone is located on a small plateau near the base of East Hill, predominantly between Van De Vanter Avenue to the east and Scenic Way to the west. The zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 70 feet and 270 feet. 366 Stetson Pressure Zone The 366 Stetson Zone is a small pressure zone located on the East Hill; this zone is supplied water by one pressure reducing station from the 485 Zone. The 366 Stetson Zone serves customers on the following four streets: Hazel Avenue N; Valley Place; Stetson Avenue; and Crest Place. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 170 feet and 230 feet. 368 Weiland Pressure Zone Water is supplied to the 368 Weiland Zone by one pressure reducing station from the 485 Zone that establishes pressure in this zone. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 110 feet and 210 feet, and is located just north of Mill Creek along Canyon Drive and Weiland Street. 416 Pressure Zone The 416 Zone is a very small zone that consists predominantly of the transmission main from the 416 Zone 6 MG #1 Reservoir to the 240 Zone 6 MG #2 Reservoir. The transmission main follows 98th Avenue S northwards from the 6 MG #1 Reservoir before crossing through several neighborhoods to the northwest until the main intersects S 218th Street, where it heads east to fill the 6 MG #2 Reservoir. There are a limited number of customers connected to the transmission main, and the City plans to transfer these customers to other pressure zones in the future. Elevations in this pressure zone range from approximately 80 feet to 380 feet. The Clark Springs Transmission Main (CSTM) terminates at the 6 MG #1 Reservoir, supplying water from Clark Springs, the Armstrong Springs Wells, and the Seven Oaks Well. 485 Pressure Zone The 485 Zone is supplied with water from Pump Station #5 and three pressure reducing stations connected to the 590 Zone. Pressures in this zone are established by the 125K Tank. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 150 feet and 400 feet, and is located between S 218th Street at its northern extent, and East Maple Street to its southern extent. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 590 Pressure Zone The 590 Zone is the system’s second largest pressure zone and serves the eastern portions of the water system. This zone is supplied water by a direct connection to the Tacoma RWSS at Point of Delivery (POD) #3, the East Hill Well, and Pump Station #5. Pressure is established by the Blue Boy Standpipe, the 3.5 MG Tank, and the 640 Tank. The 640 Tank was constructed to provide storage for a future 640 Pressure Zone but is operated in the 590 Zone until all necessary facilities are constructed for establishment of the 640 Zone. Customers in the 590 Zone are located in an elevation range between approximately 290 feet and 500 feet. The 590 Zone serves customers between SE 225th Place and SE 304th Street. West Hill 354.5 Pressure Zone The 354.5 Zone, the lowest West Hill pressure zone, is supplied water by Pump Station #3. A pressure reducing valve (PRV) at Pump Station #4 also allows the zone to be supplied from the higher elevation zones on the West Hill in a maintenance or emergency situation. The pressure in the 354.5 Zone is established by the Reith Road Standpipe. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 90 feet and 280 feet and is located primarily between Reith Road and Lake Fenwick Road. 529 Pressure Zone Water is supplied to the 529 Zone by Pump Station #4. In an emergency situation, water can be supplied from the 587 Zone through the 42nd Avenue South PRV. Pressure in the zone is established by the Cambridge Tank, located in the southwest corner of the zone. The 529 Zone serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 280 feet and 430 feet and is located in the southwest corner of the system between Military Road South and Lake Fenwick Road South. 575 Pressure Zone The 575 Zone is a small, closed pressure zone that is supplied water from Pump Station #7, which establishes the pressure in this zone. During a fire flow event exceeding the capacity of Pump Station #7, the pump station will shut off and the zone will be supplied through a check valve from the Cambridge Tank, which has an overflow elevation of 529 feet. The check valve is located at Pump Station #7. The 575 Zone is also located in the southwest corner of the City’s system between S 268th Street and S 263rd Street. This zone currently serves customers within an elevation range between approximately 410 feet and 450 feet. 587 Pressure Zone The 587 Zone is a closed pressure zone supplied water by Pump Station #6, which establishes the pressure in the zone. Like the 575 Zone, during a fire flow event exceeding the capacity of Pump Station #6, the pump station will shut off and the zone will be supplied from the Cambridge Tank, which has an overflow elevation of 529 feet, via two check valves. One check valve is located at the Pump Station #6 site, and the second is located near the intersection of Military Road South and S 259th Place. Pump Station #8 is also connected to the 587 Pressure Zone. This pump station provides water from the HWD intertie, which is available for emergency supply, fire flow, and maintenance purposes. Pump Station #8 provides the only CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-7 redundant supply to the West Hill pressure zones, which is otherwise supplied only by Pump Station #3. The 587 Zone is located in the southwest corner of the City’s system, between S Reith Road and S 239th Place. This zone provides water to customers located at an elevation between approximately 330 feet and 450 feet. SUPPLY FACILITIES Introduction Water in the City’s system is supplied predominantly from Kent Springs, Clark Springs, and the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline. The City utilizes its wells periodically to ensure that all sources are regularly exercised, but does not typically operate these sources due to their higher cost of operation compared to Kent Springs, Clark Springs, and the Tacoma intertie. A summary of the City’s sources of supply is shown in Table 2-1. Additional information on the City’s sources of supply, water treatment, and water quality monitoring is contained in Chapter 6. Table 2-1 Supply Facilities Summary Facility Type Supplies Water To Year Installed Use Existing Capacity (gpm) Water Treatment Generator 208th Street/ 212th Street Wellfield 4 wells 240 Zone 1982, 2001 Active 3,500 Chlorination, Fluoridation, Manganese/Iron/Hydrogen Sulfide Removal, pH Adjustment 208th: None 212th: Hookup for portable generator Armstrong Springs Wells 2 wells CSTM/ KSTM 1982 Active 1,050 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site Clark Springs Infiltration gallery and collector, 3 wells CSTM 1957, 1969 Active 5,400 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site generator partially powers facility East Hill Well 1 well 590 Zone 1979 Active 1,900 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site Garrison Creek Well 1 well 240 Zone 1981 Active 500 Chlorination, Fluoridation On-site generator for SCADA system only Kent Springs Infiltration gallery, 3 wells KSTM 1908, 1977, 2001 Active 3,680 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment On-site generator O'Brien Well 1 well 240 Zone 1951 Active 243 Chlorination, Fluoridation None on-site, towed generator is used Seven Oaks Well 1 well CSTM/ KSTM 1982 Active 350 Chlorination, Fluoridation, pH Adjustment None Tacoma RWWS Intertie KSTM/ 590 Zone 2005 Active 8,778 Chlorination, Fluoridation, Filtration, Ozone Treatment, pH Adjustment1 Site has full backup power 1 = pH adjustment occurs in Tacoma system and when RWSS water is directed through the KSTM to the Guiberson Reservoir. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) Water Treatment All City water sources are chlorinated and fluoridated. In 2015, the Tacoma Green River filtration facility was completed, allowing for less-constrained use of the Tacoma supply. Aeration and sodium hydroxide pH adjustment are used at the Guiberson Reservoir site to treat blended Kent Springs and Tacoma water. The City also uses pH adjustment at the 212th Street Treatment Plant, Pump Station #5, and the East Hill Well. 212th Street Treatment Plant The 212th Street Treatment Plant is located at 9001 S 212th Street and was put into service in 1993. The 212th Treatment Plant treats the water from the 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield. Like all of the City’s well and spring sources, the water goes through a chlorination and fluoridation process. Pressure filters use potassium permanganate and greensand technology to remove iron, manganese, and hydrogen sulfide at this plant. The plant also introduces a pH adjustment with the addition of sodium hydroxide to reduce the corrosivity of the finished water on household plumbing and maintain compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule. In 2008, the treatment plant received new programmable logic controller (PLC) upgrades. In 2016, a mag meter upgrade took place and a new auma valve control actuator was installed. Water Supply 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield The 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield consists of four wells – three on the 212th Street Treatment Plant site and one behind WinCo foods on S 208th Street – that supply water to the 240 Zone. The first wells were constructed in 1982, the treatment plant was brought online in 1993, and an additional well was constructed on the treatment plant site in 2001 to address a drought and declining capacity in Wells #1 and 2. The total capacity of the wellfield is approximately 3,500 gallons per minute (gpm). Interference between the three 212th Street Wells can sometimes affect the total capacity. In 2015, the 212th Street Well #3 received a motor replacement. Because the 212th Street Treatment Plant is relatively expensive to operate compared to the City’s spring sources and the Tacoma supply, the wellfield is typically only operated for around 2 weeks annually for exercise and operator familiarization. Armstrong Springs Wells The Armstrong Springs Wells are a wellfield located south of SE 272nd Street, immediately next to Jenkins and Cranmar Creek, south of Covington. The immediate surrounding area has been annexed into the City. The two wells were installed in 1982 and are approximately 80 to 90 feet deep. Permanent treatment facilities, which provide chlorination and fluoridation, were installed in 2002, and the chlorination equipment was upgraded in 2013. The wells are capable of producing approximately 1,050 gpm and can pump to either the CSTM or KSTM. Facilities at the termination points of the CSTM and KSTM provide pH adjustment. In 2016, a back-up power generator with motor control center (MCC) upgrades was installed, and the City made a 212th Street Treatment Plant Building CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-9 property purchase for the purpose of source protection. The property purchase consisted of 10 acres to the north of the wells, between the wells and Highway 516. The City has demolished all buildings on the property. Clark Springs The Clark Springs source is the easternmost City-owned source, located south of SE Kent-Kangley Road, east of Maple Valley, adjacent to Rock Creek. Like Kent Springs, the approximately 320 acres of property surrounding the Clark Springs source has been annexed to the City for municipal supply purposes. The Clark Springs water source consists of an infiltration gallery and collector, and three wells that supply water to the system via the CSTM. The water is treated with chlorine and fluoridation at the source, and is also treated at a pH adjustment facility located at the Pump Station #5 site. The total capacity of the source is approximately 5,400 gpm. Constructed in 1957, the Clark Springs infiltration gallery and collector consists of a gallery of several hundred feet of 16-inch perforated steel pipe, lying horizontally 15 to 20 feet below ground surface and extending under Rock Creek. Water is collected in the gallery from a wide area and diverted to a chamber at the beginning of the CSTM. A valved section of 12-inch pipe extending beneath the Rock Creek channel to the southern side also is connected to the gallery. Like the Kent Springs source, the Clark Springs source experiences reduced capacity in the summer months as the aquifer levels decline. The three Clark Springs wells, which are approximately 50 to 80 feet deep, were constructed in 1969 and rehabilitated in 1985 due to corrosion-related capacity reduction. Maintenance and rehabilitation of the pumps occurred in 2002. The area is subject to electrolysis problems that limit the remaining useful life of the wellfield. In 2008, a security fence was added around the infiltration gallery. Levee improvements were constructed to protect the infiltration gallery in 2008 and 2012. In 2009, the clearwell variable frequency drive (VFD) was replaced, and in 2010 the Well #2 pump received a VFD upgrade. Security improvements to the clearwell and a hood installation were completed in 2011, and a surge tank electrical upgrade was completed in 2012. In 2015, the Well #1 MCC was replaced. Due to the close proximity of the Clark Springs sources to the Landsburg Mine site, over many years the City has advised the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) of the City’s serious concerns about the site and the efforts overseen by Ecology to address the site’s environmental conditions. In recent years, the City submitted to Ecology comments in opposition to Ecology’s cleanup action plan for the site, seeking further investigation/action at the site, and a cleanup action plan more protective of area groundwater, including the Clark Springs source aquifers. The City also has implemented various activities to increase monitoring and sampling at and near Clark Springs. The Rock Creek Habitat Conservation Plan was completed in 2011. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) East Hill Well The East Hill Well was originally constructed in 1979. The well provides water directly to the 590 Zone and is located on 104th Avenue SE between SE 244th Street and SE 248th Street. The well pump and motor were replaced in 2000; a pH adjustment treatment facility was installed in 2003; and the well received new chlorination equipment in 2007. The source is also fluoridated. An on-site engine generator set for back-up power was installed in 2013. The well was redeveloped in 2017, and a new pump and motor were installed. The East Hill Well is capable of providing approximately 1,900 gpm to the system. Garrison Creek Well Located at Garrison Creek Park on the same site as the 6 MG #2 Reservoir, the Garrison Creek Well supplies water directly to the 240 Pressure Zone. The original Garrison Creek Well, installed in 1981, lost capacity as a result of the 2001 Nisqually earthquake. The well was re-drilled in 2004. Water from the Garrison Creek Well is typically pumped directly into the 6 MG #2 Reservoir but can be pumped to the distribution system. The water is chlorinated and fluoridated. The well is capable of providing approximately 500 gpm to the system. Kent Springs The Kent Springs source was originally constructed in 1908 and has been providing water to the City for over 100 years. The source is located near Black Diamond just north of Lake Sawyer, several miles east of the distribution system, in an area of approximately 75 acres that has been annexed into the City for municipal supply purposes. The source consists of a spring-fed infiltration gallery and a wellfield, both of which can provide water to the KSTM. The water from this source is treated with a chlorination and fluoridation process before being supplied to the City. New chlorination equipment was installed in 2015. Additionally, pH adjustment takes place at the Guiberson Reservoir site. The total capacity of the source is approximately 3,680 gpm. Located at the base of a hillside where the springs discharge, the Kent Springs infiltration gallery was constructed in 1908, and remains in good condition. The gallery is constructed of several hundred feet of perforated concrete pipe buried up to 10 to 15 feet deep. During the warmer months, the capacity of the infiltration gallery drops, and the wellfield is utilized. In 2015, a gallery level sensor was installed. The Kent Springs wellfield consists of three wells. Well #1 and #2 were drilled in 1977, and Well #3 was drilled during drought conditions in 2001. The wells are drilled to approximately 70 to 105 feet deep and experience a reduced capacity during the summer due to lower aquifer levels, which are speculated to be caused by increasing withdrawals from exempt wells in the area. This reduced capacity limits the ability of Kent Springs to respond to peak demand events during the summer. The wellfield is also subjected to significant corrosion problems, caused by the nearby Bonneville Power Administration power lines. In 2008, security fencing was added East Hill Well Garrison Creek Well CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-11 around Wells #1, #2, and #3. Kent Springs currently has a small generator which cannot power the entire facility; a larger-capacity generator is anticipated to be installed in the near future. O’Brien Well The O’Brien Well was originally constructed in 1951 and re-drilled in 1999. The well is located in the 240 Zone, approximately ½ mile south of the 212th Street Treatment Plant. The O’Brien Well is an artesian well, and equipped with pumping equipment to deliver up to 243 gpm to the 240 Zone. The water produced from the well is chlorinated and fluoridated. Typically, the well is only operated during periods of peak demands to supplement the primary sources. However, the well has been experiencing water quality issues and is run only occasionally to exercise the source. No back-up power is available on site. Seven Oaks Wells The Seven Oaks Well was drilled in 1982 and is located near the intersection of 116th Avenue SE and SE Kent-Kangley Road. The water is treated with a chlorination and fluoridation process before it is sent into the City’s distribution system. Water from the Seven Oaks Well can be pumped to either the CSTM or KSTM. Facilities at the termination points of these transmission mains provide pH adjustment. The well is capable of producing approximately 350 gpm but is run only occasionally to exercise the source. Tacoma RWSS In 1985, the City entered into an agreement wherein the City would share in the capital costs and operational and maintenance costs of what was previously referred to as the City of Tacoma’s Green River Pipe Line No. 5 (also previously referred to as the Second Supply Pipeline or SSP), including portions of the water right and surface water storage behind the Howard Hansen Dam. Several other purveyors also participated in the project. The City’s portion of the available capacity is 12.64 MGD, or approximately 8,778 gpm. In 2005, the 34-mile-long pipeline began conveying water. Turbidity in the Green River has historically constrained use of the Tacoma supply to the months of June through September, resulting in the construction of the Green River filtration facility. With the completion of this facility in 2015, the Tacoma supply can now be utilized year-round. The City is required to accept a consistent flow rate from Tacoma, with a 1-week warning required to change this flow rate. Other City sources provide modulation in response to actual demands. There are three City connections to the RWSS. The first, POD #1, is located at Kent Springs and supplies water to the KSTM. The second, POD #2, located near the intersection of 124th Avenue SE and SE 296th Street, has been left undeveloped. POD #2 currently consists of a manhole over the transmission main, which contains a tee with a blind flange. The third, POD #3, is located Seven Oaks Well O’Brien Well CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) near the 3.5 MG Tank, and can supply water to either the KSTM or the 590 Pressure Zone. In the future, POD #3 will provide water to the 640 Pressure Zone without the need for a booster pump station. Water is filtered at the Green River filtration facility, chlorinated, fluoridated, adjusted for pH, and undergoes ozone treatment before it reaches the City. If RWSS water is directed to the KSTM, the water also undergoes a pH adjustment before entering the distribution system at the Guiberson Reservoir. PUMP STATION FACILITIES The City’s water system has six booster pump station facilities that provide supply to the 354.5 Zone, 485 Zone, 529 Zone, 575 Zone, 587 Zone, and 590 Zone. A summary of the pumping facilities is shown in Table 2-2, and a detailed description of each facility is provided below. Table 2-2 Booster Pump Station Facilities Summary Pump Station Suction Pressure Zone Discharge Pressure Zone Year Constructed Existing Pumping Capacity (gpm) Number of Pumps Pump Type Pump Motor Size (HP)Generator Pump Station #3 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 1959 1,800 2 Horizontal split case (2) 50 On-site Pump Station #4 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 1959 3,800 3 Horizontal split case (2) 75 (1) 150 On-site Pump Station #5 416 Zone 485 and 590 Zones 1975 6,350 4 Horizontal split case (2) 125, (1) 40, (1) 40/125 On-site Pump Station #6 529 Zone 587 Zone 1984 1,200 3 Vertical turbine (3) 20 Has hookup for portable generator Pump Station #7 529 Zone 575 Zone 1985 500 2 Horizontal (2) 10 On-site Pump Station #8 Highline Water District 560 Zone 587 Zone 1986 1,200 3 Vertical turbine (3) 20 Has hookup for portable generator CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-13 Pump Station #3 Originally constructed in 1959, and upgraded in 1979 to increase capacity, Pump Station #3 is located at the intersection of Reith Road and Lake Fenwick Road. Pump Station #3 has two 900 gpm pumps that supply water from the 240 Zone to the 354.5 Zone. Besides the emergency intertie with HWD, Pump Station #3 is the only pump station supplying water to the City’s West Hill pressure zones. Typically, only one of the two pumps are operated at a time. The pump station has an on-site engine generator set for back-up power supply. Upgrades of the automatic transfer switch and motor control center, as well as the installation of either soft starts or VFDs are planned for 2018. Pump Station #4 Like Pump Station #3, Pump Station #4 was originally constructed in 1959. It has received upgrades in 1979, 1983, and 1997 to improve pumping capacity and reliability. Pump Station #4 has two 900 gpm pumps and one 2,000 gpm pump that supply water from the 354.5 Zone to the 529 Zone. This station is located on the same site as the Reith Road Standpipe. If the standpipe and Pump Station #3 are taken offline for maintenance or an emergency situation, a PRV on site can supply water to the 354.5 Zone from the HWD intertie via the 529 Zone. Pump Station #4 currently has a back-up diesel engine that can directly drive the 2,000 gpm pump if electrical power is lost. The City plans to add a new engine generator set on site because it is difficult to find replacement parts for the aging diesel engine. Pump Station #5 Located on the same site as the 6 MG #1 Reservoir and the 125K Tank, Pump Station #5 was constructed in 1975. The pump station has two 1,225 gpm pumps that supply water from the 416 Zone to the 485 Zone, and two dual-speed 1,950 gpm pumps that supply water from the 416 Zone to the 590 Zone. One of the 1,225 gpm pumps (Pump 2) is a dual speed pump that is also capable of supplying the 590 Zone. Two of these four pumps are used to supply water to the 485 Zone and the other two are used to provide water to the 590 Zone, alternating monthly which pumps are running. Back-up power is provided by an engine generator set inside the building. Control valve auma Pump Station #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #5 CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) replacements were installed in 2012. In 2015, an MCC upgrade took place, with soft starts for pumps 3 and 4. In 2016, the control vault for the 125K Tank was upgraded. The Pump Station #5 building also contains a pH adjustment facility, which provides corrosion control for water supplied to the system through the CSTM. A PRV located inside the pump station also allows water to be supplied from the 590 Zone to the 416 Zone, and from here to the 240 Zone via the 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main. This provides a means for Tacoma water to be supplied to the 240 Zone and West Hill if the KSTM and CSTM are offline. Pump Station #6 Originally constructed in 1984, Pump Station #6 is located in an underground vault near the intersection of South Reith Road and 38th Avenue South. Using three vertical turbine pumps, the booster pump station supplies water from the 529 Zone to the closed 587 Zone. One pump is typically running; the pumps alternate every 8 hours. If demands in the 587 Zone exceed approximately 1,220 gpm for 2 minutes, the pumps are automatically turned off and flow is provided by gravity through two check valves from the 529 Zone. All of the pump motors are equipped with VFDs. Pump Station #6 is not equipped with on-site back-up power, but an emergency generator transfer switch was installed in 2011. Pump Station #7 Pump Station #7 was built in 1985 and is located in an underground vault on the same site as the Cambridge Reservoir, just south of S 264th Street. This pump station is equipped with two pumps that supply water from the 529 Zone to the 575 Zone. Pump 1 (the station’s small pump) was taken offline in 2009. If demands in the 575 Zone exceed approximately 450 gpm for 3 minutes, the pumps are automatically turned off and flow is provided by gravity through a check valve from the 529 Zone. Control modifications to include VFDs took place in 2009, and a new mag meter was installed in 2012. An on-site engine generator set was installed in 2012 to provide back-up power. Pump Station #8 Pump Station #8 is an underground pump station that was built in 1986. It is located just east of I-5 on S 240th Street. The pump station is used in emergency situations to provide water from HWD to the 587 Zone and other West Hill zones. The pump station contains three identical 400 gpm vertical turbine pumps equipped with VFDs. The VFDs were replaced in 2008. Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 Pump Station #8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-15 STORAGE FACILITIES The City’s water system has nine storage facilities that provide storage to various zones in the system. A summary of the storage facilities is shown in Table 2-3, and a detailed description of each facility is provided in the following sections. Table 2-3 Storage Facilities Summary Reservoir Approximate Location Pressure Zone Year Constructed Construction Type Capacity (MG) Diameter (feet) Base Elev. (feet) Overflow Elev. (feet) 6 Million Gallon #2 Reservoir Garrison Creek Park 240 Zone 1969 Reinforced concrete below grade 6 Variable 212 240 Guiberson Reservoir E Guiberson St and Kensington Ave S 240 Zone Late 1930s Reinforced concrete below grade 3 Variable 222 240 Reith Road Standpipe Reith Rd S, just north of W Fenwick Park 354.5 Zone 1959 Steel 1.0 66 315.0 354.5 6 Million Gallon #1 Reservoir 98th Ave S and S 239th Pl 416 Zone 1967 Steel 6.0 146 370.0 418.0 125K Tank 98th Ave S and S 239th Pl 485 Zone 1958 Elevated steel 0.125 32 462.0 1 485.0 Cambridge Tank S 264th St and Military Rd S 529 Zone 1959 Elevated steel 0.3 53.33 499.1 2 529.0 3.5 MG Tank 124th Ave SE and SE 286th Pl 590 Zone 1978 Steel 3.5 74 483.4 592.9 640 Tank SE 248th St and 124th Ave SE 590 Zone (Future: 640 Zone) 2011 Steel 4.0 75 523.0 595.0 (Future: 645.0) Blue Boy Standpipe 112th Ave SE and SE 246th Pl 590 Zone 1965 Steel 0.97 42 499.7 593.8 1 = Ground elevation 386.8 feet. 2 = Ground elevation 441 feet. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 240 Zone 6 MG #2 Reservoir The 6 MG #2 Reservoir, also referred to as the Garrison Creek Reservoir, is a 6.0 MG covered, underground reinforced concrete reservoir located in Garrison Creek Park. Sports courts are located atop its roof slab. The reservoir was constructed in 1969 and provides storage for the 240 Zone. The reservoir has a base elevation of 211.5 feet and an overflow elevation of 240 feet. The reservoir diameter is variable. The 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main terminates at the reservoir. Seismic improvements were made to the reservoir in 1999. Vent security improvements were constructed in 2008. The reservoir was last inspected and cleaned approximately 3 years ago. During that time, the overflow piping was also resealed. Hatch security improvements were constructed in 2016. Guiberson Reservoir The Guiberson Reservoir, constructed in the late 1930s as part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) program, is a 3.0 MG covered, underground reinforced concrete reservoir located near the intersection of East Guiberson Street and Kensington Avenue South. The reservoir is the termination point for the KSTM and provides storage for the 240 Zone. The reservoir has a base elevation of 221.5 feet and an overflow elevation of 240 feet. A back-up generator was installed on site in 2009. A 12-inch-diameter bypass was installed in 2010, and a 10-inch flow control valve was installed in 2012. Reservoir lining was installed in 2016, along with inlet manifold and security door improvements. The exterior metal walls were recently painted. To maintain compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR), pH adjustment of water from the KSTM occurs onsite both by aeration/spraying of the discharge to strip carbon dioxide, and by a sodium hydroxide pH adjustment process at the Guiberson Corrosion facility, which was installed in 2011. Guiberson Reservoir 6 MG #2 Reservoir CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-17 354.5 Zone Reith Road Standpipe Installed in 1959, the Reith Road Standpipe is a 1.0 MG steel tank providing storage to the 354.5 Zone. The tank is located along Reith Road South, just north of West Fenwick Park. The tank has a base elevation of 315 feet, an overflow elevation of 354.5 feet, and a diameter of 66 feet. The tank was last recoated in 1991, and received some fall protection equipment in 1997. Interior and exterior recoating, as well as additional fall protection, have been identified as future capital improvement projects. Following a seismic evaluation, repairs to the concrete ringwall and anchorage were completed in 2005. Access to the back of the tank is challenging due to close proximity to a steep slope; geotechnical consultants are evaluating the feasibility of constructing a retaining wall and road around the back of the tank to improve access. 416 Zone 6 MG #1 Reservoir The 6 MG #1 Reservoir is a 6.0 MG steel tank that was constructed in 1967 and is located on the same site as Pump Station #5 and the 125K Tank (approximately 98th Avenue South and S 239th Place). The reservoir is the termination point of the CSTM and the beginning point of the 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main. Water from the CSTM receives pH adjustment at Pump Station #5. This reservoir is 146 feet in diameter, with a base elevation of 370 feet, and an overflow elevation of 418 feet. Following a seismic analysis, the reservoir received concrete ringwall and anchorage strap repairs in 2005; the exterior also was recoated at this time. The security fencing was upgraded in 2010. Reith Road Standpipe 6 MG #1 Reservoir CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 485 Zone 125K Tank The 125K Tank is located near 98th Avenue South and S 239th Place, on the same site as the 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5, where it provides 125,000 gallons of storage for the 485 Zone. The 32-foot-diameter elevated steel reservoir was constructed in 1958. The ground elevation is approximately 387 feet, the base of the tank itself is 462 feet, and the overflow elevation is 485 feet. The tank received seismic repairs, a recoating, and some fall protection improvements in 1999. Additional seismic upgrades were added in 2008. A tank drain check valve was installed in 2012. While the interior is in good condition, the exterior will need to be stripped and recoated as a future capital improvement project. 529 Zone Cambridge Tank The elevated steel Cambridge Tank, constructed in 1959, provides approximately 300,000 gallons of storage to the 529 Zone, and provides fire flow storage to the 587 and 575 Zones, which are supplied water from the 529 Zone through check valves during fire flow conditions. The reservoir is located at approximately S 264th Street and Military Road South. The 53.33-foot-diameter tank has a ground elevation of 441 feet, a tank base elevation of 499.1 feet, and an overflow elevation of 529 feet. Fall protection improvements were made in 1991 and 1997. Seismic improvements were completed in 2005, and tank overflow and drain improvements were completed in 2012. The tank is slated for interior/exterior recoating in the near future. 125K Tank Cambridge Tank CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-19 590 Zone 3.5 MG Tank The City’s 3.5 MG Tank is located near the intersection of SE 286th Place and 124th Avenue SE, just north of Auburn Mountainview High School. The 74-foot-diameter steel tank, which provides storage for the 590 Zone, was constructed in 1978. The tank has a base elevation of 483.4 feet and an overflow elevation of 592.9 feet. In 1999, the reservoir was cleaned and painted, and received fall protection modifications. A PAX mixer was installed in 2009. In 2012, a new supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) back-up power generator was installed. In 2016, a new drain vault flapper and control vault were installed, and flow meter was added, and fence security improvements were made. 640 Tank The 640 Tank, completed in 2011, is the newest storage facility in the City’s water system. It is located near the intersection of SE 248th Street and 124th Avenue SE. The 640 Tank is a 4.0 MG steel tank with a diameter of 75 feet, a base elevation of 523 feet, and an overflow elevation of 645 feet. The tank currently operates with a maximum level of 595 feet to provide storage for the 590 Zone, but will be used for storage in the future 640 Zone when other facilities for this zone are completed. Blue Boy Standpipe Constructed in 1965, the Blue Boy Standpipe is located at 112th Avenue SE and SE 236th Place and provides 0.97 MG of storage to the 590 Zone. This 42-foot-diameter reservoir has a base elevation of 499.7 feet and an overflow elevation of 593.8 feet. The last painting occurred in 1996, with an interior coating touch up in 2013. Fall protection was added in 1997. Seismic improvements, and overflow and drain line improvements were made to the reservoir in 2011. In 2012, piping and control vault improvements for the future 640 Zone were installed. 3.5 MG Tank 640 Tank Blue Boy Standpipe CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSMISSION SYSTEM The City’s water system contains 284 miles of water main ranging from 1 inch to 36 inches in diameter. As shown in Table 2-4, most of the water main (approximately 85 percent) within the system is 12 inches in diameter or less. The remaining 15 percent of the water main is 14 inches in diameter or larger. The existing water main diameter is shown on the water system node diagram figures contained in Appendix L. Table 2-4 Water Main Diameter Inventory Water main in the City’s system is constructed of asbestos cement, cast iron, concrete, ductile iron, galvanized iron, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and steel piping, with approximately 65 percent of the system constructed of ductile iron pipe. Approximately 5 percent of the water main in the system is constructed of unknown material. All new water main installations are required to use Class 52 ductile iron pipe in accordance with the City’s Standards for Water System Improvements. Table 2-5 shows the City’s existing water main inventory by material. In response to the Governor’s Directive 16-06 on lead, the City performed an assessment in 2016 to identify if any lead service lines or lead service components exist in the water system. The assessment found no lead service lines or lead service components present in the system. 4" or smaller 6" 8" 10" 12" 14"16" 18" 20" 21"24" 30" or larger Unknown Diameter (Inches) Length (Feet) % of Total 4 or smaller 24,139 1.6% 6 251,772 16.8% 8 567,492 37.8% 10 204,265 13.6% 12 232,958 15.5% 14 579 0.0% 16 76,769 5.1% 18 25,118 1.7% 20 2,817 0.2% 21 37,316 2.5% 24 54,154 3.6% 30 or larger 21,626 1.4% Unknown 1,203 0.1% Total 1,500,208 100% CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-21 Table 2-5 Water Main Material Inventory Per industry standard, the life expectancy of water main is generally 50 to 75 years, depending on a variety of piping, water quality, and soil conditions. Approximately 39 percent of the water main within the City’s system was constructed in the 1970s or before and is reaching or has reached its projected life expectancy. The remainder of the water main in the City’s water system (discounting water main of unknown installation year), was constructed in the 1980s or later and is generally in good condition. A detailed breakdown of the City’s water main installation inventory per year is shown in Table 2-6. Material Length (Feet) % of Total Asbestos Cement 11,544 0.8% Cast Iron 348,899 23.3% Concrete 81,416 5.4% Ductile Iron 979,169 65.3% Galvanized Iron 2,041 0.1% Polyethylene 585 0.0% PVC 3,113 0.2% Steel 310 0.0% Unknown 73,131 4.9% Total 1,500,208 100% Asbestos Cement Cast Iron Concrete Ductile Iron Galvanized Iron Polyethylene PVC Steel Unknown CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) Table 2-6 Water Main Installation Year Inventory Transmission Main Clark Springs Transmission Main Water supply from Clark Springs is delivered to the City through the CSTM, which is composed of 18-inch to 24-inch-diameter pipes. Water from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well can also be delivered to the City through the CSTM. Much of the alignment is routed along SE Kent-Kangley Road. The CSTM is approximately 12 miles long and terminates at the 6 MG #1 Reservoir. Kent Springs Transmission Main The KSTM delivers water to the City from Kent Springs and RWSS POD #1 through a 24- to 36-inch supply line that is approximately 11 miles long. The KSTM and CSTM are parallel for part of their alignments. Water from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well also can be delivered to the City through the KSTM. The KSTM terminates at the Guiberson Reservoir. The KSTM was originally constructed from wood and concrete pipe. A ductile iron replacement project was completed in 1997. The CSTM has an 18-inch intertie with the KSTM at Kent Springs, a 12-inch intertie with the KSTM at the Armstrong Springs Wells, and 16-inch intertie with the KSTM at the intersection of 132nd Avenue SE and SE Kent-Kangley Road. Before 1950s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Unknown Year Installed Length (Feet) % of Total Before 1950s 17,225 1.1% 1950s 79,590 5.3% 1960s 273,899 18.3% 1970s 216,196 14.4% 1980s 287,572 19.2% 1990s 267,942 17.9% 2000s 172,410 11.5% 2010s 83,322 5.6% Unknown 102,052 6.8% Total 1,500,208 100% CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-23 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Between the 6 MG #1 Reservoir and 6 MG #2 Reservoir there are approximately 1.7 miles of 16-inch transmission main. There are a limited number of service connections on this transmission main. The City plans to connect these customers to smaller-diameter distribution system piping as it is constructed in this area. PRESSURE REDUCING, PRESSURE SUSTAINING, AND FLOW CONTROL STATIONS Pressure reducing stations are connections between adjacent pressure zones that allow water to flow from the higher pressure zone to the lower pressure zone while reducing the pressure of the water to maintain a safe range of operating pressures in the lower zone. A pressure reducing station typically consists of a below-grade vault (typically concrete) that normally contains two PRVs, sometimes a pressure relief valve, piping, and other appurtenances. The PRV hydraulically varies the flow rate through the valve (up to the flow capacity of the valve) to maintain a constant set pressure on the downstream side of the valve for water flowing into the lower pressure zone. Pressure reducing stations can serve multiple purposes. First, they can function as an active supply facility by maintaining a continuous supply of water into a lower zone that has no other source of supply. The pressure reducing stations that serve the 368 Weiland Zone, 366 Stetson Zone, 339 Seattle Zone, 308 Hilltop Zone, and 271 Alvord Zone are this type. Pressure reducing stations also can function as standby supply facilities that are normally inactive (no water flowing through them). The operation of this type of station is typically triggered by a decrease in water pressure on the downstream side of the station. A typical application of this function is a station that is needed to supply additional water to a lower zone during a fire flow situation only. The pressure setting of the control valve within the station allows it to remain closed during normal system operation and open only during high-demand conditions, like fire flows, to provide the additional supply needed. Pressure sustaining stations are connections between adjacent pressure zones that allow water to flow from the higher pressure zone to the lower pressure zone, provided the pressure in the higher zone remains above a certain threshold. The City does not have any pressure sustaining stations. Flow control stations allow water to flow from a higher pressure zone to a lower pressure zone at a regulated flow rate. The City has flow control stations at the Tacoma interties, but the valves are currently fully open. The City’s water system has a total of 18 pressure reducing stations, as shown in plan view in Figure 2-1 and in profile view on Figure 2-2. A list of all pressure reducing stations and related data is contained in Table 2-7. CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-24 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) Table 2-7 Pressure Reducing Valve Station Summary WATER SYSTEM OPERATION AND CONTROL/TELEMETRY AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL SYSTEM Successful operation of any municipal water system requires gathering and using accurate water system information. A telemetry and supervisory control system gathers information and can efficiently control a system by automatically optimizing facility operations. A telemetry and supervisory control system also provides instant alarm notification to operations personnel in the event of equipment failures, operational problems, fire, or other emergency situations. The water system has a Headquarters telemetry control panel at the Public Works Building at 5821 South 240th Street. System facilities, including source, storage, and pumping, can be Station Name Upper Pressure Zone Lower Pressure Zone 218th St PRV 416 Zone 240 Zone 42nd Ave PRV 587 Zone 529 Zone Pump Station #5 PRV 590 Zone 485 Zone Alvord PRV 485 Zone 271 Alvord Zone Hilltop PRV 485 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone Seattle PRV 485 Zone 339 Seattle Stetson PRV 485 Zone 366 Stetson Zone Totem PRV 575 Zone 529 Zone Weiland PRV 485 Zone 368 Weiland Zone Woodland Way PRV 590 Zone 485 Zone 234th PRV 590 Zone 485 Zone Park Orchard PRV Future 640 Zone 590 Zone Daniel PRV Future 640 Zone 590 Zone Millineum PRV Future 640 Zone 590 Zone Pump Station #4 PRV 529 Zone 354.5 Zone RWSS POD #1 Kent Springs Tacoma Connection PRV Tacoma RWSS 529 Zone RWSS POD #3 KSTM Tacoma Connection PRV Tacoma RWSS 240 Zone RWSS POD #3 590 Tacoma Connection PRV Tacoma RWSS 590 Zone CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-25 controlled with the telemetry system. Repeaters are located on the East Hill and West Hill. Detailed, facility specific telemetry capabilities are included in Chapter 8. WATER SYSTEM INTERTIES Water system interties are physical connections between two adjacent water systems. Interties are normally separated by a closed isolation valve or control valve. Emergency supply interties provide water from one system to another during emergency situations only. An emergency situation may occur when a water system loses its main source of supply or a major transmission main, or during firefighting situations, and is unable to provide a sufficient quantity of water to its customers. Normal supply interties provide water from one system to another during non-emergency situations and are typically supplying water at all times. Interties between the City and adjacent purveyors are shown on Figure 2-4. Emergency Supply Interties City of Auburn The intertie between Auburn and the City, located near the intersection of 78th Avenue S and S 277th Street, has been active since 1991. Emergency two-way supply is provided through a 6-inch meter. The intertie capacity is 0.3 MGD and connects Auburn’s 242 Pressure Zone with the City’s 240 Zone. A copy of the intertie agreement is included in Appendix B. City of Renton The City’s intertie with Renton, active since 1980, has a capacity of 2.6 MGD. Emergency two-way supply is provided through a 10-inch meter. The intertie is located near the intersection of S 180th Street and Lind Avenue SW. The intertie connects Renton’s 196 Pressure Zone and the City’s 240 Zone. A copy of the intertie agreement is included in Appendix B. City of Tukwila The City’s intertie with Tukwila has been active since 1979 and provides a capacity of 3.4 MGD for emergency two-way supply and peak demands. A 10-inch meter connects Tukwila’s 368 Pressure Zone with the City’s 240 Zone. The intertie is located near the intersection of South Todd Boulevard and 68th Avenue South. Highline Water District The City’s intertie with HWD has been active since 1995. The intertie is located near S 240th Street and I-5. The intertie’s purpose is emergency two-way supply, fire flow, and supply during maintenance. A capacity of 1.5 MGD can be provided through an 8-inch meter. Water can be provided from HWD’s 560 Pressure Zone to the City’s 587 Zone via Pump Station #8. A copy of the intertie agreement and the 2018 long-term franchise agreement between the City and HWD are included in Appendix B. The 2018 long-term franchise agreement identifies the Retail Water Service Area (RWSA) boundary between the two systems. Soos Creek Water and Sewer District The City’s emergency intertie with Soos Creek Water and Sewer District (SCWSD) has been active since 2001. The intertie has a capacity of 1.0 MGD, providing water from SCWSD’s 627 Pressure Zone to the City’s 590 Zone. The intertie is located near the intersection of CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-26 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 113th Avenue SE and SE 227th Place. A copy of the intertie agreement is included in Appendix B. Lake Meridian Water District Two 6-inch meters comprise the intertie with Lake Meridian Water District (LMWD), which has been active since 1962. The combined capacity of these meters is 2.0 MGD. The purpose of the intertie is emergency two-way supply, and provision of water to LMWD. The intertie connects LMWD’s 590 Pressure Zone with the City’s 590 Zone. The north meter is located on SE 256th Street west of 124th Avenue SE. The south meter is located near the intersection of SE 282nd Street and 124th Avenue SE. Permanent Supply Interties City of Tacoma The City’s permanent supply interties with Tacoma is described in the Supply Facilities section of this chapter. WATER SERVICE AGREEMENTS WATER SERVICE AREA AGREEMENT The City’s retail water service area is based on the 1989 CWSP. The current retail water service area agreement is included as Appendix B. SOUTH KING COUNTY REGIONAL WATER ASSOCIATION JOINT OPERATING AGREEMENT In January 1995, the City signed a Joint Operating Agreement (JOA) with Auburn, City of Black Diamond, CWD, and LMWD. The intent of the JOA signatories was to cooperatively provide the additional facilities needed to develop a South King County Subregional Water Supply System. The JOA is included in Appendix B. SECOND SUPPLY PROJECT PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT In 1933, Tacoma established a priority date for its second water right diversion from the Green River. In 1963, Tacoma initiated efforts to develop what was referred to as Pipeline-5 and is now called the Second Supply Pipeline project. In 1985, the City contracted with Tacoma Public Utilities (TPU) to purchase 7.2 MGD of summer peaking water from the proposed RWSS project. In 1995, TPU, Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and its purveyors, and the South King County utilities of the City, CWD, LWSD, and LMWD, began nearly 5 years of discussions and negotiations regarding the framework, conditions, and costs of project participation. Significant changes to the contractual framework of the project, including the withdrawal of LMWD, occurred in the early stages of the project, and a complex and highly technical multi-party negotiation ensued. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-27 In October, 2002, a final agreement was reached with TPU, the City, LWSD, and CWD. The agreement and all amendments are included in Appendix B. In the course of that final agreement, the City’s share of the RWSS was increased to 12.64 MGD after SPU determined that it would no longer participate in the project. Water supply from the RWSS project became available to the City in 2007. The percent ownership of the RWSS project is detailed in Table 2-8. Table 2-8 Regional RWSS Percent Ownership The RWSS source of supply is considered critical to the City’s ability to meet short- and long-term demand needs. In this regard, the City has expended substantial financial resources on the RWSS project in reliance on the Ecology-approved water right and place of use documents issued to Tacoma, and the executed contracts. In addition to the RWSS Partnership Agreement, Water Supply Agreements were signed by RWSS project participants. These Water Supply Agreements are included in Appendix B. SATELLITE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT A Satellite System Management Agency (SSMA) is defined as a person or entity that is certified by DOH to own or operate more than one public water system without the necessity for a physical connection between such systems. SSMAs were created to stop the proliferation of small water systems, many of which could not meet federal and state water quality and water system planning regulations. The goal of SSMAs is to ensure that the people of Washington State will receive safe and reliable water supplies in the future from professionally managed or properly operated water systems. SSMAs can provide three different levels of service: 1. Ownership of the satellite system; 2. Operations and management of the satellite system; or 3. Contract services only. The service can be provided to new systems, existing systems that are no longer viable, or existing systems placed into receivership status by DOH. The City is responsible for providing water service to all customers in the City’s water service area defined in the CWSP. Much of the area surrounding the City’s service area is currently being served by large, stable water systems that are unlikely to be future satellite water systems operated by the City. Tacoma Public Utilities 41.67% (15/36ths) City of Kent 19.44% (7/36ths) Covington Water District 19.44% (7/36ths) Lakehaven Water and Sewer District 19.44% (7/36ths) Utility Partner Percent Ownership CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-28 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) The City is not a certified SSMA and has no plans to assume such responsibility. The City does provide limited technical assistance, specifically water quality testing, to one small system in the Clark Springs watershed, the Ravensdale Mobile Home Park. ADJACENT WATER SYSTEMS Numerous water systems are adjacent or close to the City’s water service area. Figure 2-3 shows the regional water supply setting, including the City’s and other purveyor service areas. Table 2-9 lists details of all purveyors shown on Figure 2-3. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-29 Table 2-9 Adjacent Systems Water System Name Approximate Location in Relation to the City's Retail Water Service Area Approximate Number of Service Connections Source of Supply Cedar River Water and Sewer District Northeast 10,026 4 interties, 1 groundwater well City of Auburn South 24,132 2 groundwater springs, 11 groundwater wells, 5 interties City of Renton North 17,400 1 groundwater spring, 13 groundwater wells, 4 intertie City of Tukwila North 4,036 5 interties Covington Water District East 18,500 12 groundwater wells, 8 interties Highline Water District West 27,870 5 groundwater wells, 5 interties Lake Meridian Water District East 5,269 7 groundwater wells, 8 interties King County Water District 125 Northwest 6,746 5 interties King County Water District 49 Northwest 6,902 4 interties Lakehaven Water and Sewer District Southwest 45,792 25 groundwater wells, 3 interties Seattle Public Utilities Northwest 173,833 1 intertie, 4 groundwater wells, 2 surface water source Soos Creek Water and Sewer District East 22,898 1 intertie CHAPTER 2 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 2-30 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) Eight major adjacent purveyors, which include Auburn, Renton, Tukwila, CWD, HWD, LWSD, SCWSD, and LMWD are described below in additional detail. CITY OF AUBURN Auburn’s water service area is located to the south of the City. Auburn provides water to approximately 24,132 service connections. An intertie between the two water systems provides emergency two-way supply. Auburn is within the South King County Critical Water Supply Service Area, and thus is subject to the South King County CWSP. CITY OF RENTON Renton’s water service area is located to the northeast of the City’s water service area and includes a small area of the City of Kent. Renton provides water to approximately 17,400 service connections. An intertie between the two water systems provides emergency two-way supply. Renton is within the East King County Critical Water Supply Service Area, and thus is subject to the East King County CWSP. CITY OF TUKWILA Tukwila’s water service area is located to the north of the City’s water service area. Tukwila provides water to approximately 4,036 service connections. An intertie between the two cities provides water for emergency two-way supply and peak demands. COVINGTON WATER DISTRICT CWD is located to the east of the City’s water service area, and surrounds the Kent Springs, Clark Springs, and Armstrong Springs Wells sources. While these sources and portions of the CSTM and KSTM are located in CWD’s water service area, the two water service areas are not immediately adjacent. CWD provides water to approximately 18,500 service connections. CWD is a member of the Tacoma RWSS. CWD is located within the South King County Critical Water Supply Service Area; thus, it is subject to the South King County CWSP. HIGHLINE WATER DISTRICT HWD is located to the west of the City’s water service area and provides water service to part of the Kent City limits on the West Hill. HWD provides water service to approximately 27,870 service connections and has an intertie with the City at Pump Station #8. The City executed an interlocal agreement in 2005 with HWD to adjust water service areas in the vicinity of the Kentview Development. A Long-Term Franchise Agreement was executed by the City and HWD in 2018. A copy is included in Appendix B. HWD is located within the South King County Critical Water Supply Service Area and is subject to the South King County CWSP. LAKEHAVEN WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT LWSD is located to the southwest of the City’s water service area. Although boundaries are close, the City’s and LWSD’s water service areas are not immediately adjacent. LWSD provides water service to approximately 45,792 service connections. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH2.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:02 PM) 2-31 SOOS CREEK WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT SCWSD is located to the east of the City’s water service area and provides water service to a significant portion of the City, around Panther Lake. SCWSD has approximately 22,898 service connections, and an intertie with the City. SCWSD is located within the East King County Critical Water Supply Area, and thus is subject to the East King County CWSP. LAKE MERIDIAN WATER DISTRICT LMWD is located to the east of the City’s water service area and provides water service to a significant portion of the City, around Lake Meridian. LMWD provides water service to approximately 5,269 service connections and has two interties with the City. LMWD is located within the South King County Critical Water Supply Service Area; thus, it is subject to the South King County CWSP. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Esri, HERE, Garmin, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community 8 4 T H A VE S 2 56 TH ST C O VI N G T O N - S A W Y E R R D P A C I F I C H WY S MILITA RY R D S JAM E S S T 6 8 T H A VE S 240TH ST K E N T - D E S MO I N E S R D 3 0 4 TH S T MILITARY R D S MEEKER ST 2 98TH ST TIT US ST 192ND ST 2 0 0 T H S T 1 5 2 N D A VE S E 2 40 TH ST 2 1 2 T H WA Y 1 8 0 T H A VE S E 212TH ST JAME S ST K E N T - D E S MO I N E S R D S 43 R D ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WA Y C O VI N G T O N W A Y S E SR 167 4 T H A VE N WAX RD 260 TH ST 5 5 T H A VE S 2 1 6 TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST 1 6 T H A VE S 3 7 T H S T N W A U B U R N WA Y N G OWE ST 20 8TH ST 223RD S T C O V I N G T O N - S A W Y E R R D 1 2 4 T H A VE S E 1 4 0 T H A VE S E 2 88TH ST 2 5 9 T H P L 1 2 4 T H A VE S E WAX RD 1 1 6 T H A VE S E 1 1 6 T H A VE S E 2 22ND ST 2 7 2 N D S T 1 3 2 N D A VE S E 224T H ST 2 00TH ST S R 1 8 24 8TH S T 1 0 8 T H A VE S E 1 88TH ST 5 1 S T A VE S 4 T H A VE S 1 8 8 T H S T 1 4 8 T H A VE S E REI T E N RD 2 4 T H A VE S 2 2 8 T H S T 43 R D ST C E N T R A L A VE N 272ND ST 2 41S T S T WE S T VA L L E Y H WY 3 7 T H A VE S P E T E R G R U B B R D S E 30 4TH ST TAL BOT RD S S M I TH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 1 6 4 T H A VE S E I - 5 F WY 6 4 T H A VE S S T A R L A K E R D C E N T R A L A VE S 1 4 4 T H A VE S E 1 9 6 T H A VE S E 1 6 4 T H A VE S E 6 T H A VE S 2 8 1 S T S T 1 0 8 T H A VE S E 240T H ST 6 4 T H A VE S 3 4 T H A VE S 3 6 T H A VE S 2 16TH S T 9 4 T H A VE S 304TH ST S W E E N E Y R D S E 30 4 TH ST 1 6 T H A VE S 1 9 6 T H A VE S E 2 28 TH ST 2 92ND S T SR 1 8 I-5 FWY 2 88TH ST SR 16 7 KEN T - K A N G L E Y R D 1 0 4 T H A VE S E 2 18TH ST SR 1 67 272 ND ST 2 1 2 T H S T J A S O N A VE N 1 1 2 T H A VE S E 296TH ST 27 4T H ST PET R O VITSKY R D 1 9 6 T H S T 196 TH ST WES T VALLEY H WY S 2 04TH WAY 1 8 0 T H S T 4 2 N D A VE S 3 7 T H P L S K E N T - B L A C K D I A M O N D R D S E M I L I T A R Y R D S 18 0 TH ST 2 67TH ST 232 ND ST 6 8 T H A VE S WE S T VA L L E Y H WY N O R I L L I A R D S V ETERANS DR 2 4 2 N D S T 6 5 T H A VE S 2 4 4 T H S T 4 0 T H P L S I-5 FWY 1 6 4 T H P L S E REITH RD 37TH S T N E C A R R R D 18 0TH S T 3 7T H ST NE EAST VALL E Y HWY S I N T E R N A T I O N A L B L VD S R 167 22 4TH S T 3 5 T H A VE S M APLE S T 1 6 T H A VE S 1 8 0 T H A VE S E S O U T H C E N T E R P K WY I - 5 FWY 200 TH ST 2 0 T H A VE S 4 2 N D A VE S G R E E N R I VE R R D 2 7 2 N D W A Y E A S T VA L L E Y H WY S I - 5 F W Y 8 8 T H A VE S T H O MA S R D S E 7 6 T H A VE S I - 5 FWY G R E E N R I VE R R D S E DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2 0 2,000 4,000 1,000 Feet Legend Kent City Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King County UGA Unincorporated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Intertie PRV Kent Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 2-1 EXISTING SYSTEM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEET Vicinity Map Figure 2-1City of KentCity of KentExisting Water System2018 Water System Plan2018 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representation derived from the City of Kent Geographic Information System. It was designed and intended for City of Kent staff use only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy. This map is based on the best information available on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portions thereof, is prohibited without express written authorization by the City of Kent. This material is owned and copyrighted by the City of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet Star Lake Panther LakeL a k e M e ri d i a n G r e e n R iverGreenRiverGreen River Enhancement Area 240 Zone 587 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 354.5 Zone 590 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 339 Seattle Zone 271 Alvord Zone 485 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone Cambridge Tank 0.3 MG Reith Road Standpipe 1.0 MG 640 Tank 4.0 MG Blue Boy Standpipe 0.97 MG Guiberson Reservoir 3.0 MG 6 MG #2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir 125K Tank 0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 Pump Station #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #5 East Hill Well 208th/212th Street Wellfield and 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'Brien Well Garrison Creek Well Tacoma POD #3 S u m m i t - L a n d s b u r gR dSR 1 8 Witte Rd S E SE 24 0 St S E 244 S t 14 8 Av S E SE 256 St 187 Av SE 1 9 6 Av SE 180 Av S E Map l eVal l ey B l kD i amond144 Av SE 152 Av SE 216 Av SE 193 Av SE SE Wax Rd S E Kent Ka n g l ey R d164 A v SE Covingt on Wy SE SE Kent K angley R d164 Av SE SE Wax R dWitte Rd S E SR 18 S R 1 8 SE 2 4 0 St SE Kent Kangl ey Rd SE 2 40 St SE 24 0 St W i t t e R d S E SE 24 0 St 180 Av SE SE 240 S t Witte Rd SE SR 18 SR 18 SR 1 8 S R 18 SE 2 56 St S R 18 16 4 A v SE SE Wax RdSR 18 Map l eVal l e y B l k D i amondSR 18 SR 18 SR 18 SR 1 8 SE 256 St Clark Springs Kent Springs Armstrong Springs Wells Lake Meridian Pipe Lake Armstrong Springs Wells Tacoma POD #2 (Undeveloped) City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of Des Moines City of Federal Way City of Auburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 Clark Springs Transmission Main Kent Springs Transmission Main Tacoma POD #1 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Lake Wilderness Spring Sources and Transmission Mains 1" = 4,000' Angle La k e City of Tukwila Hydraulic Profile for the City of Kent Date:Filename:KEN\117-100\CAD\KEN-HPX.DWGSeptember 6, 2018 Water System Plan Legend 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 368 Weiland Zone 354.5 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 416 Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone Booster Pump Station Pressure Reducing Station Facilities at Same Site Intertie Figure 2-2: Existing System 366 Stetson Zone 590 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 416 Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 200' 300' 400' 500' 600' 700' 100' P Pump Station #7 (500 gpm) Cambridge Tank 0.3 MG Ground Elev: 441' Base Elev: 499.1' Overflow Elev: 529' Diameter: 53.33' Totem PRV P 42nd Ave PRV P Pump Station #4 (3,800 gpm) 125K Tank 0.125 MG Ground Elev: 386.8' Base Elev: 462' Overflow Elev: 485' Diameter: 32' Reith Road Standpipe 1.0 MG Base Elev: 315' Overflow Elev: 354.5' Diameter: 66' P Pump Station #3 (1,800 gpm) WEST HILL Guiberson Reservoir 3.0 MG Base Elev: 221.5' Overflow Elev: 240' Diameter: Variable Seattle PRV Stetson PRV Alvord PRV O' Brien Well (243 gpm) P P 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield (3,500 gpm) Woodland Way PRV 6 MG #1 Reservoir 6.0 MG Base Elev: 370' Overflow Elev: 418' Diameter: 146' Pump Station #5 (6,925 gpm) 234th PRV P East Hill Well (1,900 gpm) Garrison Creek Well (500 gpm) 3.5 MG Tank 3.5 MG Base Elev: 483.4' Overflow Elev: 592.9' Diameter: 74' Seven Oaks Well (350 gpm) Blue Boy Standpipe 0.97 MG Base Elev: 499.7' Overflow Elev: 593.8 Diameter: 42' EAST HILL 354.5 Zone Hilltop PRV Weiland PRV 6 MG #2 Reservoir 6.0 MG Base Elev: 211.5' Overflow Elev: 240' Diameter: Variable P Clark Springs (5,400 gpm) Clark Springs Transmission Main Kent Springs Transmission Main P Kent Springs (3,680 gpm) P Armstrong Springs Wells (1,050 gpm) Tacoma Public Utilities Tacoma POD #3 (to 590 Zone) 894' Tacoma POD #3 (to KSTM) City of Tukwila Emergency Intertie P PS #5 PRV Soos Creek Water District Emergency Intertie P City of Auburn Emergency Intertie City of Renton Emergency Intertie 640 Tank 4.0 MG Base Elev: 523' Overflow Elev: 595' (Future: 640') Diameter: 75' Highline Water District Emergency Intertie Pump Station #8 (1,200 gpm) Check Valve 218th Street PRV Lake Meridian Water District Emergency Intertie 212th Street Treatment Plant PS #4 PRV P P Clark Springs Transmission Main P P Kent Springs Transmission Main P Tacoma POD #1 (Kent Springs) P P P P P P P 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main PS #5 590/485 PRV Check Valve CSTM/KSTM Intertie CSTM/KSTM Intertie 590/KSTM Intertie 590/CSTM Intertie @ 114th Valve Station Pump Station #6 (1,200 gpm) PS #6 Check ValvePS #7 Check Valve Military Rd Check Valve 200' 300' 400' 500' 600' 700' Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community City ofRenton City ofTukwila City o f Ke ntWater Service Area Hi ghlineWaterDistrict Cedar RiverWater andSewer District SoosCreek Water andSewer District CovingtonWaterDistrict Lake MeridianWater Distric t LakehavenWater and SewerDistrict City ofAuburn SeattlePublicUtilities 84THAVES256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER RDPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K E NT-DESMOINESRD304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674T H A VENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST 259TH P L 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST ST 37THAVESP ETERGR U B BRDSE 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESSTAR L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 TH S T PETROVI TSKY RD98THAVES196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITH RD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent Ci ty Li mits Neighbo ring City L imits City o f Kent Pote ntialAnnexation A reas King County UGA Unincor porate d Kin gCounty (Outsi de UGA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Adjacent Wat er Sys temService Ar eas Cedar R iver Water andSewer Di stric t City o f Aub urn City o f Rent on City o f Tukw ila Covingt on Water D istri ct Highli ne Wa ter Di stric t Lake Me ridian Wat erDistrict King Co unty WaterDistrict 125 King Co unty WaterDistrict 49 Lakehav en Wa ter a ndSewer Di stric t Seattl e Publ ic Ut ilit ies Soos Cr eek Water a ndSewer Di stric t J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 2-3 ADJACENT SYSTEM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: SEP 25, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 2-32019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Inform ation System . Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea Lak eMeridian PipeLake Water Transmission Mains to Kent Watersheds1" = 4,000'Sum mi t-L a n d sburgR dSR 18Witte Rd SESE 240 St SE 244 St 148 Av SESE 256 St 187 Av SE196 Av SE180 Av SEMapleValleyBlkDiamond144 Av SE152 Av SE216 Av SE193 Av SESE W ax RdS E K e n t K a n g le y R d164 Av SECo v i n g t o n Wy SE216 Av SESE Kent Kangley Rd164 Av SESE Wax RdWitte Rd SESR 18SR18SE 240 St SE K ent K angley Rd SE 240 St SE 240 St SE 240 St Witt e Rd S E SE 240 St 180 Av SESE 240 St Witte Rd SESR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St SR 18164 Av SESE Wax RdSR 18MapleValley Blk Di amon d180AvSE SR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St Water Service Area and Adjacent Water SystemsCity of KentCity of KentCedar RiverWater andSewer District CovingtonWaterDistrict LakeMeridianWaterDistrict AngleLake PipeLake Lak eWilderness Sp rin g Sources and Tran smissio n Mains1" = 4,000' Lake Meridian Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community City ofRenton City ofTukwila City o f KentWater Service Area HighlineWaterDistrict SoosCreek Water andSewer District CovingtonWaterDistrict Lake MeridianWater District LakehavenWater and SewerDistrict City ofAuburn SeattlePublicUtilities 84THAVES256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER RDPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K E NT-DESMOINESRD304TH STMILITARY RD SMEE KER ST 298TH ST TITUS ST 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674T H A VENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST 259TH P L 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST ST 37THAVESP ETERGR U B BRDSE 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESSTAR L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 TH S T PETROVI TSKY RD98THAVES196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITH RD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent City Limits Neighbor ing City Limits City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Intertie Adjacent Wat er SystemService Areas Cedar Ri ver Water andSewer Dist rict Cit y of Auburn Cit y of Renton Cit y of Tukwila Covingt on Water Distri ct Highl ine Water Distr ict Lake Meri dian WaterDistrict Ki ng County WaterDistrict 125 Ki ng County WaterDistrict 49 Lakehaven Water andSewer Dist rict Seat tle Public Uti lities Soos Creek Water andSewer Dist rict Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 2-4 EMERGENCY INTERTIES.MXD BY: SPERKINS PLOT DATE: SEP 25, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 2-42019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the City of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the City of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea LakeMeridian PipeLake Emergency IntertiesCity of KentCity of KentCedar RiverWater andSewer District I AngleLake PipeLake LakeWilderness Lake Meridian I II I I I Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) 3-1 3 | LAND USE AND POPULATION INTRODUCTION The State of Washington Growth Management Act (GMA) requires, among other things, consistency between land use and utility plans and their implementation. This chapter demonstrates the compatibility of the City’s WSP with other plans, identifies the designated land uses within the existing and future service area, and presents population and employment projections within the City’s planning area. COMPATIBILITY WITH OTHER PLANS AND POLICIES To ensure that the WSP is consistent with the land use policies that guide it and other related plans, the following planning documents were examined. • State of Washington Growth Management Act • Puget Sound Regional Council VISION 2040 Part III: Multicounty Planning Policies • City of Kent Comprehensive Plan • City of Kent Midway Subarea Plan • City of Kent Downtown Subarea Action Plan • City of Tukwila Comprehensive Plan • City of Auburn Comprehensive Plan • King County Countywide Planning Policies • King County Comprehensive Plan • South King County Coordinated Water System Plan GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT The State of Washington GMA of 1990 (and its multiple amendments) defined four goals relevant to this WSP: 1. Growth should be in urban areas; 2. There should be consistency between land use and utility plans and their implementation; 3. There should be concurrency of growth with public facilities and services; and 4. Critical areas should be designated and protected. Urban Growth Area The GMA requires that King County (County) designate an Urban Growth Area (UGA) where most future urban growth and development will be directed. The county-wide UGA is defined in the County’s Comprehensive Plan and encompasses the area where this urban growth and CHAPTER 3 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 3-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) development is projected to occur over the 20-year planning period. The current King County UGA boundaries in the vicinity of the City are shown on Figure 3-1. Potential Annexation Areas A Potential Annexation Area (PAA) is an area identified by King Count y and a City as expected to annex into that City during the 20-year planning period. The City has five PAAs, which are shown on Figure 3-1. Upon annexation, the City will be expected to provide services and utilities to the annexed area. Consistency The GMA requires planning consistency from two perspectives. First, it requires consistency of plans among jurisdictions. This means that plans and policies of the City and County must be consistent per Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 36.70A.100. Second, the GMA requires the implementation of the WSP be consistent with the comprehensive plans (RCW 36.70A.120). The 2003 Municipal Water Law also requires that water system plans are consistent with local plans and regulations. The signed Consistency Statement Checklists included in Appendix C from the City and King County Planning Departments document the determination that this WSP is consistent with their plans and regulations. Concurrency Concurrency means that adequate public facilities and services be provided at the time growth occurs. For example, growth should not occur where schools, roads, and other public facilities are overloaded. To achieve this objective, the GMA directs growth to areas already served or readily served by public facilities and services (RCW 36.70A.110). It also requires that when public facilities and services cannot be maintained at an acceptable level of service, the new development should be prohibited (RCW 36.70A.110). Critical Areas The GMA requires that critical areas be designated and protected. Critical areas include aquifer recharge areas, wetlands, frequently flooded areas, streams, wildlife habitat, landslide hazard areas, seismic hazard areas, and steep slopes. The City has adopted development regulations identifying and protecting critical areas as required. The City does not currently have any critical facilities located in a floodplain and does not plan to construct any new facilities within the floodplain in the future. The State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist in Appendix D addresses other environmental concerns. PUGET SOUND REGIONAL COUNCIL VISION 2040 PART III: MULTICOUNTY PLANNING POLICIES The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) is designated by the governor of the State of Washington as the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and Regional Transportation Planning Organization (RTPO) for the central Puget Sound region, defined as King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. VISION 2040 “is a shared strategy for moving the central Puget Sound region toward a sustainable future.” Part III: Multicounty Planning Policies contains six CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN LAND USE AND POPULATION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) 3-3 major policy sections: Environment, Development Patterns, Housing, Economy, Transportation, and Public Services. Under each section, goals, policies, actions, and measures are identified. All of the City’s functional plans are required to be consistent with the PSRC’s Multicounty Planning Policies. CITY OF KENT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The City of Kent’s Comprehensive Plan was last updated in 2015. The plan was developed to describe the City’s vision for 2035 and provide goals and policies for achieving it, as well as to meet the requirements of the GMA. The Land Use Element of the City’s Comprehensive Plan is the City’s vision of how growth and development should occur over a 20-year horizon. While the Land Use Element goals and policies set forth general standards for locating land uses, the Land Use Plan Map (Figure LU-6), portions of which are shown in Figure 3-1, indicates geographically where certain types of uses may be appropriate. The Land Use Plan Map is a blueprint for development of an area, whereas the zoning map and zoning code are the regulatory means for implementing development. The Land Use Element considers the general location of land uses, as well as the appropriate intensity and density of land uses given the current development trends. The Utilities, Transportation, and Capital Facilities Elements ensure that new development will be adequately served without compromising adopted levels of service, consistent with the principal of concurrency as defined in the GMA. The City’s 2011 WSP was incorporated by reference into the Utilities Element of the Comprehensive Plan. CITY OF KENT MIDWAY SUBAREA PLAN The City of Kent’s Midway Subarea Plan was adopted by the Kent City Council on December 13, 2011. The Midway Subarea is located along the extreme western portion of Kent and contains the commercial spine for Kent’s West Hill residents. In the near future, it is anticipated that a light rail station will be constructed in this area, near Highline Community College. The Subarea Plan conveys a range of actions that prepares the area for high capacity light rail transit. In conjunction with the redevelopment of the area, it is anticipated that population and employment growth in the Midway Subarea will greatly exceed PSRC projections for the area. CITY OF KENT DOWNTOWN SUBAREA ACTION PLAN The City of Kent’s Downtown Subarea Action Plan was adopted by the Kent City Council on November 19, 2013. The Subarea Action Plan recognizes that suburbanization has shifted economic activity away from Downtown and seeks to support proactive planning and public improvements to maintain Downtown’s vitality. Goals, policies, and actions are conveyed in the Subarea Action Plan as a means for Downtown to pursue a dense, mixed-use urban center that complements transit. CHAPTER 3 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 3-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) CITY OF TUKWILA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The City of Tukwila’s (Tukwila) Comprehensive Plan was last amended in 2015 and presents the goals for Tukwila’s growth and development in the next 20 years. Tukwila’s Comprehensive Plan considers zoning and development of major land use types, including residential neighborhoods, the Tukwila International Boulevard District, Tukwila South, Tukwila’s urban center, and the manufacturing/industrial center. Tukwila’s Comprehensive Land Use Map shows current and future land use designations for these land use types. The City’s water system does not serve any customers within Tukwila’s city limits. Tukwila’s Comprehensive Plan also provides guidance for economic development, housing, natural environments, shorelines, parks, recreation, and open space, utilities, transportation, and capital facilities. CITY OF AUBURN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The City of Auburn’s (Auburn) Comprehensive Plan was last adopted in December 2015, with land use comprising the first Element of the plan. The Land Use Element describes existing land uses, provides criteria for assigning land use types, and outlines policies for each use of land. The Land Use Element should be used in conjunction with Auburn’s Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map (Map 1.1) to geographically understand zoning and land use activities allowed in certain areas. Auburn’s land uses inside the southeast portion of the City’s water service area are shown in Figure 3-1. In addition to the Land Use Element, Auburn’s Comprehensive Plan also contains six other Elements, including housing, capital facilities, utilities, transportation, economic development, and parks and recreation. These Elements are planned together to ensure Auburn will be adequately supported in future growth scenarios. KING COUNTY COUNTYWIDE PLANNING POLICIES The County’s 2012 Countywide Planning Policies are a series of policies that address growth management issues in King County. The current version of the policies includes amendments ratified by June 25, 2016. For consistency with the PSRC VISION 2040, the Countywide Planning Policies are also organized into the policy sections of Environment, Development Patterns, Housing, Economy, Transportation, and Public Facilities and Services. Page 47 of the Countywide Planning Policies identifies specific policies related to water supply. All of the City’s functional plans are required to be consistent with the County’s Countywide Planning Policies. KING COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The current version of the King County Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 2016, and last amended in 2018. Chapters include the following. • Regional Growth Management Planning • Urban Communities • Rural Areas and Natural Resource Lands CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN LAND USE AND POPULATION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) 3-5 • Housing and Human Services • Environment • Shorelines • Parks, Open Space, and Cultural Resources • Transportation • Services, Facilities, and Utilities • Economic Development • Community Service Area Subarea Planning • Implementation, Amendments, and Evaluation The County’s plan is focused on six guiding principles, as follows. 1. Creating Sustainable Neighborhoods 2. Preserving and Maintaining Open Space and Natural Resource Lands 3. Directing Development Towards Existing Communities 4. Providing a Variety of Transportation Choices 5. Addressing Health, Equity and Social and Environmental Justice 6. Achieving Environmental Sustainability The County’s Comprehensive Plan guides development and designates land use in unincorporated King County. County land use inside the City’s future water service area is shown in Figure 3-1; the Comprehensive Plan can be referenced for County land use outside the future water service area. SOUTH KING COUNTY COORDINATED WATER SYSTEM PLAN The South King County Coordinated Water System Plan (CWSP), originally dated October 1989, was developed under direction from the County’s Water Utility Coordinating Committee (WUCC), the County, and Seattle Water Department. The members of the WUCC represent the collective efforts of all public water systems with more than 50 service connections that provide service within the Critical Water Supply Service Area (CWSSA). The King County Council declared South King County a CWSSA on December 15, 1985. The purpose of the CWSP is to assist the area’s water utilities in establishing an effective process for planning and developing public water systems and restricting the proliferation of small public water systems. The CWSP accomplishes this by establishing future service area boundaries, minimum design standards, service review procedures, appeals procedures, long-term regional water supply strategies, and the satellite system management program. As can be seen in the following sections of this WSP, the City has established policies, design criteria, and goals that meet or exceed the requirements and goals of the CWSP. LAND USE The existing retail water service area includes portions of the City, Auburn, Tukwila, and unincorporated King County, for a total of 23.7 square miles. The water service area’s land use CHAPTER 3 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 3-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) map, as shown in Figure 3-1, guides development and can be used to forecast future demands. Land use outside the City is designated by adjacent cities or the County, as shown in Figure 3-1. Approximately 29.2 percent of the area within the current Water Service Area is designated for single-family residential use, as indicated in Table 3-1. Approximately 28.9 percent is designated for industrial use; approximately 13.9 percent is designated for open space/greenbelt/public use; approximately 9.0 percent is designated for agriculture; approximately 8.9 percent is designated for commercial use; approximately 8.9 percent is designated for multi-family residential use; and approximately 1.3 percent is other or undesignated use. Table 3-1 Land Use Inside Water Service Area POPULATION HOUSEHOLD TRENDS The City’s residential areas are comprised largely of single-family residences. In 2015, the City’s Comprehensive Plan estimated that there were approximately 44,932 housing units in the City. Of these, approximately 21,298 housing units (47.4 percent) were detached one-unit structures, approximately 21,792 housing units (48.5 percent) were one-unit attached or located in multi-unit structures, while approximately 1,842 housing units (4.1 percent) were mobile homes or other types. The City’s 2015 Comprehensive Plan update indicates an average household size of 2.9 persons. Land Use Type Acres % of Total Agriculture 1,368 9.0% Commercial1 1,348 8.9% Industrial2 4,380 28.9% Open Space/Greenbelt/Public3 2,100 13.9% Single-family Residential4 4,418 29.2% Multi-family Residential 1,344 8.9% Other 196 1.3% Total 15,154 100% 1 = Includes Mixed-use, Neighborhood Services, Transit Oriented Community, and Urban Center land use types. 2 = Includes Tukwila Valley South land use type. 3 = Includes Auburn Public Use District land use type. 4 = Includes Mobile Home Park and King County Urban Residential Medium land use types. Agriculture Commercial Industrial Open Space/ Greenbelt/ Public Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential Other CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN LAND USE AND POPULATION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) 3-7 EXISTING AND FUTURE CITY POPULATION The City has experienced rapid population growth and extensive physical development since 2000. The population of the County increased by approximately 24 percent from 2000 to 2017, based on Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM) estimates. The population of the City increased by approximately 60 percent during the same period. A significant portion of the City population increase is due to the 2010 annexation of the Panther Lake area into the City, which added approximately 25,458 residents. Table 3-2 illustrates the historical population growth since 2000, with years 1990 and 1995 for reference. Table 3-2 Population Trends within the City Limits Projected future growth for the City is shown in Table 3-3. Projections are based on Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) estimates for years 2020, 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040. Projections from the Midway Subarea Plan were considered as part of the population projections, and were determined to be approximately equivalent to the population projections based on the PSRC projections within the City’s retail water service area. Projected population for intermediate years was calculated by assuming a uniform population growth rate between data points. The total City population is expected to experience an average annual growth rate of approximately 0.4 percent between 2017 and 2038 (the planning horizon of the WSP). Population projections for the City are displayed in Chart 3-1. Year Population 1990 37,960 1995 47,124 2000 79,524 2005 86,967 2010 92,411 2011 118,200 2012 119,100 2013 120,500 2014 121,400 2015 122,900 2016 124,500 2017 127,100 NOTE: The historical population represents the population within the City limits. The sources of the historical population numbers are the decennial census and OFM intercensal estimates. CHAPTER 3 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 3-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) Table 3-3 Water System Population and Employment Projections Year City Population Water System Population Water System Employment 2016 124,500 68,157 64,755 2017 127,100 69,465 65,356 2018 127,857 69,653 65,956 2019 128,615 69,841 66,557 2020 129,372 70,029 67,157 2021 129,923 70,259 67,530 2022 130,474 70,490 67,904 2023 131,024 70,721 68,279 2024 131,575 70,952 68,655 2025 132,126 71,183 69,031 2026 132,554 71,403 69,281 2027 132,982 71,622 69,529 2028 (+ 10 years)133,411 71,842 69,777 2029 133,839 72,061 70,025 2030 134,267 72,281 70,274 2031 134,673 72,487 71,022 2032 135,078 72,693 71,770 2033 135,484 72,899 72,517 2034 135,889 73,105 73,265 2035 136,295 73,312 74,013 2036 136,727 73,596 75,227 2037 137,158 73,881 76,440 2038 (+ 20 years)137,590 74,166 77,653 Projected Existing CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN LAND USE AND POPULATION Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) 3-9 Chart 3-1 Population and Employment Projections WATER SYSTEM POPULATION The actual number of people served by the City’s water system is different than the population of the City limits. The City currently serves part of the City limits, as well as small areas of Auburn, Tukwila, and unincorporated King County. There are areas within the City limits that are served by other water systems. The existing population served by the water system, with the exception of areas of unincorporated King County, was calculated using OFM census block estimates from the Small Area Estimate Program for 2016 and 2017. Some census blocks were partially inside and partially outside the water service area boundary. To account for this, the percentage by area of these census blocks that were inside the water service area was calculated, and the total population of the census block was multiplied by this percentage. Population estimates for areas of unincorporated King County served by the water system were provided by King County. The estimated existing population served by the water system in 2016 is 68,157 and the estimated existing population served by the water system in 2017 is 69,465, as shown in Table 3-3. The projected future population of the water system, with the exception of areas of unincorporated King County, was calculated using Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ) data from PSRC. As in the census block data used to calculate the existing water system population, the population of TAZs that were split by the water service area boundary were adjusted based on 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000 110,000 120,000 130,000 140,000 150,000 PopulationYear City Limits Population Water Service Area Population Water Service Area Employment ProjectedHistorical CHAPTER 3 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 3-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH3.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:08 PM) the area of the TAZ within the water service area. Population projections from the Midway Subarea Plan were not utilized. The Subarea Plan identifies the potential for increased growth in the Midway Subarea above PSRC estimates. However, only approximately 3 percent of the Midway Subarea overlaps the retail water service area, so the impact of this potential increased growth on the water system population projections is expected to be minor. The City does not expect the retail water service area to increase during the 20-year planning period to contain a larger portion of the Midway Subarea. To project the water system population forward, the estimated 2017 water system population from Table 3-3 was utilized as a basis. PSRC TAZ population projections for 2020, 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040 were utilized, and projected population for intermediate years was calculated by assuming a uniform population growth rate between data points. Population estimates provided by King County were used for the areas of the water system located in unincorporated King County. For the purposes of estimating demands, the population projections for the water system are presented in Table 3-3. The system is expected to provide service to approximately 74,166 people by 2038. Water system population projections are also shown in Chart 3-1. WATER SYSTEM EMPLOYMENT Because non-residential water use is a significant portion of the City’s total water use, the total employment for the water system was calculated for use in demand projections. The existing and future number of employees working in the water service area, with the exception of areas of unincorporated King County, were calculated using census tract data available from PSRC. As in the calculations of water system population, the employment of census tracts that were split by the water service area boundary were adjusted based on the area of the census tract within the water service area. PSRC employment projections for 2015, 2020, 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040 were utilized, and projected population for intermediate years was calculated by assuming a uniform employment growth rate between data points. Employment estimates for areas of unincorporated King County served by the water system were provided by King County. Employment projections from the Midway Subarea Plan were not utilized. Because only a small portion of the Midway Subarea overlaps the City’s retail water service area and no expansion of the retail water service area in the Midway Subarea is anticipated during the 20-year planning period, the impact of this potential increased growth on the water system’s total employment projections is expected to be minor. For the purposes of estimating demands, the employment projections for the water system are presented in Table 3-3. Employment projections are also shown in Chart 3-1. Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community KC-UM MU SF-6 SF-6 MDMF I US AU-R5 AU-R1AU-PUD KC-AG KC-I KC-UM KC-UM KC-OS KC-AG KC-OS KC-OS KC-GB KC-GB C MUOS MIC OS OS US AG-R US US CIOS SF-8 SF-4.5 SF-4.5 OS AG-R SF-4.5 LDMFUS I MDMF I MHP LDMFOSI SF-4.5 MDMF MU MDMF SF-6TOC TOC OS LDMF LDMF OSLDMF ISF-8 UC OS LDMF MU MHP MU MDMF SF-4.5 MDMFOSLDMF NS OS MDMF LDMF OSSF-8 MDMF SF-8 OS OS MHP MDMF OS MU OS OS LDMFC MDMF MDMF SF-8 SF-6 MDMF MDMF OS MU MDMF LDMFSF-6 LDMFUSMU MDMF LDMF C MDMF AG-R OS AG-S SF-6LDMFLDMF MHP OS SF-8 SF-6MDMF LDMFMDMFOS LDMFLDMF LDMF SF-8 SF-4.5 SF-8 LDMFMDMF MU MDMFMHPLDMF SF-8 LDMF SF-6 LDMF SF-8 LDMF OS MDMF SF-6 OS OS LDMF US SF-4.5 OS OS I I US MU MUIIMU I MU SF-6 MDMF LDMF OS SF-3 US SF-6 SF-6 SF-6 I TVS 84THAVES256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER RDPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SM E E K E R S T298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 212TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESEJAMES ST KENT-DES M OIN ES RD S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674T H A VENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW 256TH ST AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST 124THAVESE259T H PL WAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST 248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST WESTVALLEYHWYCENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST ST 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST CA N Y O NDRS E 164THAVESE64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVESI-5 FWY36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE2 2 8 T HST292ND ST SR18I-5 FWYSR 167288TH ST KENT-KA N G L EY RD104THAVESE218THSTSR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 T H S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AYI-5FWY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S E 180TH STMI LI TARYRDS232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S DR 242 N DST SR1865THAVESI-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEASTVALLEY HWYSINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REEN RIVERRD2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5 FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent City Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas Kin g County UGA Unincorporated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area City of Kent Land Us e Agricultural Resource (AG-R) Agricultural Su pport (AG-S) Commercia l (C) Industrial (I) Low Density Multifamily (LDMF) Me dium Density Multifamily (MDMF) Mo bile Home Park (MHP) Ma nufacturing/Industrial Center (MIC) Mixed-Use (MU) Neighb orhood Service s (NS) Parks & Open Space (OS) Sin gle Family 3 Units/Acre (SF-3) Sin gle-Family 4.5 Units/Acre (SF-4.5) Sin gle-Family 6 Units/Acre (SF-6) Sin gle-Family 8 Units/Acre (SF-8) Tran sit Oriented Community (TOC) Urban Center (UC) Urban Separator (US) City of Auburn Land Use Public Use District (AU-PUD) Residential Use 1 DU/Acre (AU-R1) Residential Use 5 DU/Acre (AU-R5) City of Tukwila Land Use Tu kwila Valley South (TVS) Unincorporated King County Land Use Agriculture (KC-AG) Industrial (KC-I) Greenbelt/Urban Separator (KC-GB) Open Space (KC-OS) Urban Residen tial Medium 4-12 DU/ac (KC-UM)J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 3-1 LAND USE.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: SEP 24, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 3-1City of KentCity of KentLand Use2018 Water System Plan2018 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. T hismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this m ap,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express w ritten authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is ow ned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet A n g le L a k e Green RiverNatural ResourcesArea P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiver StarLake Lake Youngs Orillia R oad South PAA Midway PAA South LakeFenwick PAA Gree n Riv erPAA North Green RiverPark PAACity of Federal Way City of A uburn City of D es Moines City of SeaTac City of Renton City of Covington City of Kent City of Tukwila THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-1 4 | WATER DEMANDS INTRODUCTION A detailed analysis of system demands is crucial to the planning efforts of a water supplier. A demand analysis first identifies current demands to determine if the existing system can effectively provide an adequate quantity of water to its customers under the most crucial conditions, in accordance with federal and state laws. A future demand analysis identifies projected demands to determine how much water will be needed to satisfy the water system’s future growth and continue to meet federal and state laws. The magnitude of water demands is typically based on three main factors: 1) population; 2) weather; and 3) water use classification. Population and weather have the two largest impacts on water system demands. Population growth tends to increase the annual demand, whereas high temperatures tend to increase the demand over a short period of time. Population does not solely determine demand because different user types use varying amounts of water. The use varies based on the number of users in each customer class, land use density, and irrigation practices. Water use efficiency efforts also impact demands and can be used to accommodate a portion of the system’s growth without increasing a system's supply capacity. Demands on the water system determine the size of storage reservoirs, supply facilities, water mains, and treatment facilities. Several different types of demands were analyzed and are addressed in this chapter, including average day demand, maximum day demand, peak hour demand, fire flow demand, future demands, and a demand reduction forecast based on the Water Use Efficiency program. CERTIFICATE OF WATER AVAILABILITY In accordance with the requirements of the Growth Management Act (GMA), the City of Kent (City) must identify that water is available prior to issuing a building permit. If the property requesting water service is outside of the City limits, a “No Protest of Annexation and Declaration of Covenant” may be required by the City, as identified in the City’s Instructions and Checklist for Certificate of Water Availability. The requirement for providing evidence of an adequate water supply was codified in 1990 under Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 19.27.097 in the Building Code section. CURRENT POPULATION AND SERVICE CONNECTIONS WATER USE CLASSIFICATIONS The City has divided all water customers into ten different classes for billing purposes. For planning purposes, the water customers have been combined into five different groups: 1) single-family residential; 2) multi-family residential; 3) commercial; 4) industrial; and 5) public. The public group includes City of Kent facilities, government, and schools billing classes. The demand analysis that follows will report on the water use patterns of these five user groups. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) RESIDENTIAL AND EMPLOYMENT POPULATION SERVED The residential population within the City limits was 124,500 in 2016, based on estimates from the Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM). Since the City does not provide water service to all customers within the City limits, the actual population served by the City’s water system is smaller. The 2016 residential population served by the City within the water service area is estimated to be approximately 68,157 in 2016, and 69,465 in 2017, as presented in Chapter 3. Because non-residential water use is a significant portion of the City’s total water use, the total employment for the water system was calculated to project the future water system demands. The existing and future number of employees working in the water service area were calculated using census tract data available from the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) and data provided by King County. The 2016 employment population served by the City within the water service area is estimated to be approximately 64,755 in 2016, and 65,356 in 2017. The computation of the population served is discussed in Chapter 3, along with a more detailed discussion of the City’s population and household trends. EXISTING WATER DEMANDS WATER CONSUMPTION Water consumption is the amount of water used by all customers of the system, as measured by the customer’s meters. Table 4-1 shows the historical average number of connections, average annual consumption, and average daily consumption per connection of each customer class for the City from 2011 through 2016. As shown in Table 4-1, the City provided water service to an average of 14,907 connections in 2016. Approximately 10,981 connections (74 percent) were single-family residential customers, 1,682 connections (11 percent) were multi-family residential customers, 1,883 connections (13 percent) were commercial customers, 98 connections (less than 1 percent) were industrial customers, and 263 connections (2 percent) were public customers. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-3 Table 4-1 Average Annual Metered Consumption and Service Connections Year Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential Commercial Industrial Public Totals 2011 10,339 1,674 1,846 97 252 14,207 2012 10,498 1,674 1,849 97 253 14,371 2013 10,631 1,678 1,859 98 253 14,518 2014 10,775 1,681 1,868 98 256 14,678 2015 10,872 1,681 1,874 98 259 14,783 2016 10,981 1,682 1,883 98 263 14,907 2011 591,332,522 774,421,604 705,851,696 183,370,704 95,741,008 2,350,717,534 2012 598,972,295 813,131,352 708,109,160 149,259,660 92,413,904 2,361,886,371 2013 599,690,973 806,081,452 724,312,336 148,935,776 95,972,888 2,374,993,425 2014 624,470,792 818,546,124 771,937,047 163,497,092 102,842,520 2,481,293,575 2015 642,706,284 838,680,040 809,905,976 168,551,328 115,714,852 2,575,558,480 2016 631,193,966 842,255,480 840,994,352 163,321,312 100,454,904 2,578,220,014 2011 157 1,268 1,048 5,179 1,043 453 2012 156 1,327 1,047 4,204 1,000 449 2013 155 1,316 1,068 4,178 1,038 448 2014 159 1,334 1,129 4,571 1,102 463 2015 162 1,367 1,184 4,712 1,226 477 2016 157 1,368 1,220 4,557 1,043 474 Average 157 1,330 1,116 4,567 1,075 461 Customer Class Average Annual Consumption (gallons) Average Number of Connections Average Daily Consumption Per Connection (gal/day/conn) As shown in Chart 4-1, the single-family residential class represents approximately 74 percent of all connections, but only 24 percent of total system consumption, as shown in Chart 4-2. This is due to the lower consumption per connection of single-family residential customers as compared to other customer types. As shown in Table 4-1, single-family residential customers use an average of approximately 157 gallons per day (gpd) per connection, compared to multi-family customers that use an average of approximately 1,330 gpd per connection. Multiple units are typically served by one multi-family residential connection, resulting in additional consumption per connection compared to single-family residential connections. Multi-family residential consumption per connection is similar to the consumption of commercial and public customers that use an average of approximately 1,116 and 1,075 gpd per connection, respectively. Industrial customers use significantly more water with an average of approximately 4,567 gpd per connection. The higher consumption rate per connection of commercial, public, and industrial customers compared to single-family residential customers is expected since these customers include the system’s highest individual water users. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Chart 4-1 2016 Water Connections by Customer Class Chart 4-2 2016 Water Consumption by Customer Class Table 4-2 shows the largest 20 water users of the system in 2016, and their total amount of metered consumption for the year. The total water consumption of these 20 water accounts represented approximately 14.2 percent of the system’s total metered consumption in 2016. The list of customer accounts in Table 4-2 consists of water users from all customer classes except the single-family residential class, with the majority of the largest users considered commercial customers. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-5 Table 4-2 Largest Water Users Name Address Total Annual Consumption (gallons) Danone Waters of North America 21608 85th Ave. S 52,190,700 Kings Command Foods, LLC 7622 S 188th St.29,917,512 Air Gas 8008 S 222nd St.26,700,149 Con Agra Foods 6320 S 190th St.24,458,243 Aramark Uniform Services 7810 S 228th St.23,679,523 King County Administration Building 401 4th Ave. N 22,599,339 Rexam Beverage Can Company 1220 2nd Ave. N 21,581,243 Mikron Industries 1136 6th Ave. N 20,869,099 Kent 228 8010 S 228th St.16,743,603 Alsco 6906 S 204th St.15,037,301 Northwest Center 22247 76th Ave. S 13,696,796 Oberto Sausage Company 7060 S 238th St.12,315,895 Danone Waters of North America 21608 85th Ave. S 12,134,867 Boeing Defense and Space Group 20403 68th Ave. S 12,101,205 Smith Brothers Farms 26401 79th Ave S.11,293,311 Northwest Center 22247 76th Ave. S 10,661,209 Hytek Finishes Co.8127 S 216th St.10,401,635 Oberto Snacks, Inc.7060 S 238th St.10,211,631 Flow International 23316 64th Ave. S 9,900,442 Hume Investments, Inc.25246 106th Ave. SE 9,863,787 Largest Water Users Total Consumption 366,357,488 Water System Total Metered Consumption 2,578,220,014 Large Water Users Percent of Total Metered Consumption 14.2% Residential demand varies throughout the year, typically peaking in the hot summer months. Other customers often peak at different times or have different peaking factors because their uses and consumption patterns differ. The demand for all customers in the City generally peaks in the summer, as shown in Chart 4-3. Residential and commercial consumption have the largest peaks in the summer, as shown in Chart 4-3. Industrial and public consumption has less pronounced peaks, but also typically peaks in the summer, as shown in Chart 4-3. The City reads public and industrial meters monthly, and most residential and commercial meters every two months as shown in Chart 4-3. A two-period moving average trendline is shown for the customer classes that are read every two months to approximate the actual 2016 monthly consumption data. The consumption data are also shown as data points in Chart 4-3. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Chart 4-3 2016 Monthly Consumption by Customer Class 0 20,000,000 40,000,000 60,000,000 80,000,000 100,000,000 120,000,000 140,000,000 Monthly Consumption (gallons)Public Industrial Commercial Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential Commercial Moving Average Single-family Moving Average Multi-family Moving Average WATER SUPPLY Water supply, or production, is the total amount of water supplied to the system, as measured by the meters at source of supply facilities. Water supply is different than water consumption in that water supply is the recorded amount of water put into the system and water consumption is the recorded amount of water taken out of the system. The measured amount of water supply of any system is typically larger than the measured amount of water consumption, due to non-metered water use and water loss (i.e., distribution system leakage), which will be described more in the Distribution System Leakage section. Table 4-3 summarizes the total amount of water supplied to the system from 2011 through 2016. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-7 Table 4-3 Historical Water Supply Year Annual Supply (gallons) 2011 2,498,178,000 2012 2,566,823,000 2013 2,593,245,000 2014 2,659,170,000 2015 2,811,692,000 2016 2,818,790,000 Like most other water systems, the City’s water use varies seasonally. Chart 4-4 shows the historical amount of water supplied to the City’s system for each month from 2011 to 2016. Chart 4-4 Historical Monthly Water Supply 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Total Supply (million gallons)2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Average As shown in Chart 4-4, water supply increases significantly during summer months, primarily due to irrigation. The City’s highest water use typically occurs in July and August. On average, the amount of water supplied during these 2 months is approximately 23 percent of the total supply for the entire year. Chart 4-5 shows the monthly water supply by source for 2016. In 2016, the majority of water was supplied from the Clark Springs and Kent Springs, with smaller volumes coming from the East Hill Well, and the City of Tacoma’s Second Supply Pipeline (SSP) Connection CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) #1 (240 Zone) and SSP Connection #3 (590 Zone) sources. Table 4-4 and Chart 4-6 show the annual water supply by source from 2011 to 2016. In 2016, the City’s two primary sources, Clark Springs and Kent Springs, supplied 68 percent of the total supply to the system. The relative volume supplied from each of the City’s sources has been similar since 2011, but the volume of water consumed within the City has steadily inclined from 2011 to 2016. This is most likely the result of the 700 new service connections added to the system and the increased usage of water per connection of both commercial and multi-family residential customer classes. Table 4-4 also presents the system-wide average day demand for 2011 through 2016. Chart 4-5 2016 Monthly Water Supply by Source 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Monthly Supply Volume (million gallons)Clark Springs Kent Springs East Hill Well Armstrong Springs Wells Garrison Creek Well 212th St. Treatment Plant SSP Connection #1 (240 Zone)SSP Connection #3 (590 Zone) Table 4-4 Historical Supply by Source and System-wide Average Daily Demand Average Day Demand (gpm) 2011 1,375.9 743.8 125.5 79.8 0.0 6.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 166.4 0.3 2,498.2 4,753 2012 1,340.8 728.8 228.8 39.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.3 0.0 217.8 0.3 2,566.8 4,870 2013 1,297.8 751.5 183.3 88.8 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 271.7 0.2 2,593.2 4,934 2014 1,347.3 822.8 176.2 82.5 0.0 8.1 0.0 16.1 0.0 205.8 0.4 2,659.2 5,059 2015 1,188.3 809.7 158.7 97.5 1.7 17.5 98.7 82.3 0.0 357.2 0.0 2,811.7 5,349 2016 1,146.2 776.8 106.4 21.1 0.0 9.7 0.0 284.2 1.4 472.5 0.5 2,818.8 5,348 Year Annual Supply Volume (MG) Net SupplyInterties SSP Conn. #3 (590 Zone) SSP Conn. #3 (240 Zone) SSP Conn. #1 (240 Zone) 212th St. Treatment Plant Garrison Creek Well Seven Oaks Well Armstrong Springs Wells East Hill Well Kent Springs Clark Springs CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-9 Chart 4-6 Annual Water Supply by Source 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016Annual Supply (million gallons)Clark Springs Kent Springs East Hill Well Armstrong Springs Wells Garrison Creek Well 212th St. Treatment Plant SSP Connection #1 (240 Zone)SSP Connection #3 (590 Zone) Table 4-5 shows the 2016 demand of each of the City’s 13 existing pressure zones. The demands are based on the City’s 2016 individual customer meter data. The City’s two largest pressure zones, the 240 and 590 Zones, account for approximately 89 percent of the total system demand. Figure 2-1 in Chapter 2 presents the City’s pressure zones. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Table 4-5 2016 Demands by Pressure Zone Pressure Zone 2016 Annual Supply (gallons) Average Daily Demand (gpm) Percent of Total Demand 240 1,618,150,124 3,070 57.4% 271 Alvord 6,166,085 12 0.2% 308 Hilltop 215,708 0 0.0% 339 Seattle 5,887,243 11 0.2% 354.5 23,848,860 45 0.8% 366 Stetson 1,283,724 2 0.0% 368 Weiland 1,694,095 3 0.1% 416 0 0 0.0% 485 97,852,402 186 3.5% 529 77,623,224 147 2.8% 575 14,531,337 28 0.5% 587 72,225,269 137 2.6% 590 899,311,928 1,706 31.9% Total 2,818,790,000 5,348 100.0% Table 4-6 presents the computation of the existing system per capita demand based on 2016 data. As shown in the upper portion of the table, the residential population served by the City’s water system in 2016 was approximately 68,157. This population served and the City’s total residential water consumption in 2016 (total combined consumption of the single- and multi-family residential customer classes) were used to calculate the existing residential per capita demand of 65 gpd. The lower portion of the table presents the employment population served by the City’s water system in 2016, which was approximately 64,755. This population served and the City’s total employment water consumption in 2016 (total combined consumption of the commercial, industrial, and public customer classes) were used to calculate the existing employment per capita demand of 51 gpd. Table 4-6 Existing Per Capita Demand 2016 Residential Population Served Calculated 2016 Residential Population Served 68,157 2016 Total Annual Residential Supply (gallons) 2016 Total Annual Residential Supply (gallons)1,610,934,886 Existing Residential Per Capita Supply (gal/day/capita)65 2016 Employment Population Served Calculated 2016 Employment Population Served 64,755 2016 Total Annual Employment Supply (gallons) 2016 Total Annual Employment Supply (gallons)1,207,855,114 Existing Employment Per Capita Supply (gal/day/capita)51 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-11 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM LEAKAGE The difference between the amount of water supply and the amount of authorized water consumption is the amount of distribution system leakage (DSL). There are many sources of DSL in a typical water system, including water system leaks, inaccurate supply metering, inaccurate customer metering, illegal water system connections or water use, fire hydrant usage, water main flushing, and malfunctioning telemetry and control equipment resulting in reservoir overflows. Several of these types of usages, such as water main flushing and fire hydrant usage, may be considered authorized uses if they are tracked and estimated. Although real losses from the distribution system, such as reservoir overflows and leaking water mains, should be tracked for accounting purposes, these losses must be considered leakage. The Water Use Efficiency (WUE) Rule establishes a DSL standard of 10 percent or less based on a rolling 3-year average. The City has tracked water usage from flushing main lines and dead-ends since 2011, and many other authorized usage volumes. The amount of DSL in the City’s system has been under 10 percent since 2011, as shown in Table 4-7. The City will continue to record authorized water usage and improve the reporting of additional authorized water uses. The City will also implement the WUE Program contained in Appendix E. Table 4-7 Distribution System Leakage Description 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Metered Customer Use 2,350.7 2,361.9 2,375.0 2,481.3 2,575.6 2,578.2 Public Works Hydrant Meters 31.7 31.7 31.1 62.6 50.7 43.1 Unidirectional & Dead End Flushing 1.8 1.7 3.0 2.0 1.8 1.7 Storm and Sewer Vactor Meters 0.8 0.9 1.8 1.5 1.5 1.2 Routine Maintenance 4.9 5.6 1.9 5.7 1.4 1.5 Other Operations 10.3 5.8 15.4 7.8 7.3 13.3 KSTM Leak 11.0 26.3 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.8 Total Authorized Consumption 2,411.2 2,433.9 2,439.2 2,571.9 2,649.3 2,650.8 Gross Supply (Finished Water)2,498.2 2,566.8 2,593.2 2,659.2 2,811.7 2,818.8 Total DSL Volume 87.0 132.9 154.1 87.3 162.4 168.0 Total DSL Percentage 3.5%5.2%5.9%3.3%5.8%6.0% Rolling 3-Year Average DSL Percentage ------4.9%4.8%5.0%5.0% Adjusted DSL Percentage1 5.9%8.0%8.4%6.7%8.4%8.5% Year Authorized Consumption (MG) Total Supply (MG) Distribution System Leakage (MG) (1) The adjusted DSL percentage is based on the difference between metered consumption and net supply. The calculation does not include the DSL reduction associated with other authorized non-metered consumption. The annual DSL percentages are applied to the consumption by water use classification as reported in Table 4-1 to determine the net supply per water use classification. Supply per water use classification for 2011 through 2016 is summarized in Table 4-8. The net supply per water use classification is used in the equivalent residential unit (ERU) calculations to determine the number of ERUs for each customer class. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Table 4-8 Average Annual Supply by Customer Class Year DSL Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential Commercial Industrial Public Total Demand (i.e. Net Supply) 2011 5.9%628,426,800 823,001,056 750,129,759 194,873,545 101,746,840 2,498,178,000 2012 8.0%650,944,043 883,685,296 769,550,517 162,210,652 100,432,492 2,566,823,000 2013 8.4%654,799,968 880,156,834 790,873,492 162,622,327 104,792,379 2,593,245,000 2014 6.7%669,237,213 877,225,218 827,274,877 175,217,704 110,214,989 2,659,170,000 2015 8.4%701,631,173 915,572,284 884,160,143 184,004,527 126,323,874 2,811,692,000 2016 8.5%690,089,763 920,845,123 919,466,321 178,560,588 109,828,206 2,818,790,000 Annual Supply (gallons) EXISTING EQUIVALENT RESIDENTIAL UNITS The demand of each customer class can be expressed in terms of ERUs for demand forecasting and planning purposes. One ERU is equivalent to the amount of water used by a single-family residence. The number of ERUs represented by the demand of the other customer classes is determined from the total demand of the customer class and the unit demand per ERU from the single-family residential demand data. Tables 4-9A and 4-9B present the computed number of ERUs for each customer class from 2011 through 2016. The demands shown are based on the consumption totals of each customer class and the authorized non-revenue water consumption shown in Table 4-8. The average demand per ERU from 2011 through 2016 (6-year average) was 171 gpd, which is slightly less than the average single-family residential demand in the Puget Sound area, which is typically between 200 and 300 gpd. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-13 Table 4-9A Equivalent Residential Units Year Average Number of Connections Average Annual Demand (gallons) Demand per ERU (gal/day/ERU) Total ERUs 2011 10,339 628,426,800 167 10,339 2012 10,498 650,944,043 169 10,498 2013 10,631 654,799,968 169 10,631 2014 10,775 669,237,213 170 10,775 2015 10,872 701,631,173 177 10,872 2016 10,981 690,089,763 172 10,981 2011 1,674 823,001,056 167 13,540 2012 1,674 883,685,296 169 14,251 2013 1,678 880,156,834 169 14,289 2014 1,681 877,225,218 170 14,124 2015 1,681 915,572,284 177 14,187 2016 1,682 920,845,123 172 14,653 2011 1,846 750,129,759 167 12,341 2012 1,849 769,550,517 169 12,411 2013 1,859 790,873,492 169 12,840 2014 1,868 827,274,877 170 13,320 2015 1,874 884,160,143 177 13,700 2016 1,883 919,466,321 172 14,631 Single-family Residential (ERU Basis) Multi-family Residential Commercial CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Table 4-9B Equivalent Residential Units Year Average Number of Connections Average Annual Demand (gallons) Demand per ERU (gal/day/ERU) Total ERUs 2011 97 194,873,545 167 3,206 2012 97 162,210,652 169 2,616 2013 98 162,622,327 169 2,640 2014 98 175,217,704 170 2,821 2015 98 184,004,527 177 2,851 2016 98 178,560,588 172 2,841 2011 252 101,746,840 167 1,674 2012 253 100,432,492 169 1,620 2013 253 104,792,379 169 1,701 2014 256 110,214,989 170 1,775 2015 259 126,323,874 177 1,957 2016 263 109,828,206 172 1,748 2011 14,207 2,498,178,000 167 41,099 2012 14,371 2,566,823,000 169 41,396 2013 14,518 2,593,245,000 169 42,102 2014 14,678 2,659,170,000 170 42,815 2015 14,783 2,811,692,000 177 43,567 2016 14,907 2,818,790,000 172 44,854 171Average 2011 to 2016 System-wide Totals Industrial Public The average demand per ERU from 2011 through 2016 of 171 gpd will be used later in this chapter to forecast ERUs in future years based on estimated future demands. This demand per ERU value will also be used to determine the capacity (in terms of ERUs) of the existing system in Chapter 7. PEAK DEMANDS Average Day Demand Average day demand (ADD) is the total amount of water delivered to the system in a year divided by the number of days in the year. The ADD is determined from the historical water use patterns of the system and can be used to project future demands within the system. ADD data are typically used to determine standby storage requirements for water systems. Standby storage is the volume of a reservoir used to provide water supply under emergency conditions when supply facilities are out of service. Water production records from the City’s wells and spring CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-15 sources were reviewed to determine the system’s ADD. The system’s average day demand from 2011 through 2016 is shown in Table 4-4. Maximum Day Demand Maximum day demand (MDD) is the maximum amount of water used throughout the system during a 24-hour time period of a given year. MDD typically occurs on a hot summer day when lawn watering is occurring throughout much of the system. In accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-230, the distribution system shall provide fire flow at a minimum pressure of 20 pounds per square inch (psi) during MDD (i.e., peak day demand) conditions. Supply facilities (e.g., wells, springs, pump stations, interties) are typically designed to supply water at a rate that is equal to or greater than the system’s MDD. One-hour interval water production and reservoir level records from 2016 were reviewed to determine the system’s MDD. The City’s MDD occurred on Wednesday, August 17, 2016, when temperatures reached approximately 80 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF). As shown in Table 4-10, the average demand of the system on August 17, 2016, or MDD, was 11,629 gallons per minute (gpm). Table 4-10 Maximum Day Demands and Peaking Factors Demand Type Date Demand (gpm) Average Day Demand (ADD)2016 5,348 Maximum Day Demand (MDD)August 17, 2016 11,629 Peak Hour Demand (PHD)August 17, 2016 16,995 9:00 PM - 10:00 PM 2.17 1.46 3.18Peak Hour Demand/Average Day Demand (PHD/ADD) Peak Demand Data Peaking Factors Maximum Day Demand/Average Day Demand (MDD/ADD) Peak Hour Demand/Maximum Day Demand (PHD/MDD) Peak Hour Demand Peak hour demand (PHD) is the maximum amount of water used throughout the system, excluding fire flow, during a 1-hour time period of a given year. In accordance with WAC 246-290-230, new public water systems or additions to existing systems shall be designed to provide domestic water at a minimum pressure of 30 psi during PHD conditions. Equalizing storage requirements are typically based on PHD data. The PHD, like the MDD, is typically determined from the combined flow of water into the system from all supply sources and reservoirs. One-hour interval water production and reservoir level records were reviewed to evaluate the PHD. As shown in Table 4-10, the City’s PHD, which occurred on August 17, 2016, from 9:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., was 16,995 gpm. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Table 4-10 also shows the peaking factors of the water system based on the ADD, MDD, and PHD data. The 2017 ADD was not available at the time of these analyses; therefore, the estimated 2016 ADD was used to estimate the peaking factors of the system. The MDD/ADD demand ratio of 2.17 is within the typical range of 1.2 to 2.5 for most Puget Sound area systems. The PHD/MDD ratio of 1.46 is within the typical range of 1.3 to 2.0 for most Puget Sound area systems. These peaking factors will be used later in this chapter in conjunction with projected ADDs, to project future MDDs and PHDs of the system. FIRE FLOW DEMAND Fire flow demand is the amount of water required during firefighting as defined by applicable codes. Fire flow requirements are established for individual buildings and expressed in terms of flow rate (gpm) and flow duration (hours). Fighting fires imposes the greatest demand on the water system because a high rate of water must be supplied over a short period of time, requiring each component of the system to be properly sized and configured to operate at its optimal condition. Adequate storage and supply are useless if the transmission or distribution system cannot deliver water at the required rate and pressure necessary to extinguish a fire. General planning-level fire flow requirements were established for the different land use categories to provide a target level of service for planning and sizing future water facilities in areas that are not fully developed. The general planning-level fire flow requirement for each land use category is shown in Table 4-11. The water system analyses presented in Chapter 7 are based on an evaluation of the water system for providing sufficient fire flow in accordance with these general planning-level fire flow requirements. The fire flow requirements shown in Table 4-11 do not necessarily equate to actual existing or future fire flow requirements for all buildings, since this is typically based on building size, construction type, and fire suppression systems provided. Improvements to increase the available fire flow to meet actual fire flow requirements greater than those shown in Table 4-11 shall be the responsibility of the developer. Table 4-11 General Planning-level Fire Flow Requirements Land Use Category Planning-level Fire Flow Requirement (gpm) Flow Duration (hours) Agriculture 1,000 1 Open Space/Greenbelt/Public 1,000 1 Single-Family Residential 1,500 1 Multi-Family Residential 1,500 1 Commercial1 3,500 3 Industrial2 3,250 4 1 = Includes Mixed-Use, Neighborhood Services, and Urban Center land use types. 2 = Includes King County Industrial and Manufacturing/Industrial Center land use types. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-17 FUTURE WATER DEMANDS BASIS FOR PROJECTING DEMANDS Future demands were calculated from the results of the future per capita demand computations shown in Table 4-6 and the projected population data from Chapter 3. Future demand projections were computed with and without water savings expected from implementing WUE measures contained in the City’s WUE Program in Appendix E. The calculated future per capita demand of 65 gpd was used for all residential demand projections without savings from WUE measures, and the calculated future per capita demand of 51 gpd was used for all employment demand projections without savings from WUE measures. The per capita demand was reduced to reflect the WUE goals and used as the basis for future water demand projections with implementation of the WUE Program. The City’s WUE Program presents goals to reduce the multi-family residential consumption by 1 percent annually and reduce the public agency consumption by 0.5 percent in June through August on an annual basis. The City also has a continued goal to maintain DSL at 6 percent or less each year. DEMAND FORECASTS AND CONSERVATION Table 4-12 presents the projected water demand forecast for the City’s water system. The actual demand data from 2016 is also shown for comparison purposes. The future ADDs were projected based on residential and employment population estimates for the given years and the estimated demand per capita values from Table 4-6. The future MDDs and PHDs shown were computed from the projected ADDs and the existing system peaking factors shown in Table 4-10. The future demand projections are also shown with and without estimated reductions in water use from achieving WUE goals. Table 4-12 Future Water Demand Projections Actual 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2038 2068 (+10 yrs)(+20 yrs)(+50 yrs) Residential Population 68,157 69,465 69,653 69,841 70,029 70,259 70,490 70,721 70,952 71,183 71,403 71,622 71,842 74,166 82,705 Employment Population 64,755 65,356 65,956 66,557 67,157 67,530 67,904 68,279 68,655 69,031 69,281 69,529 69,777 77,653 114,053 Residential ADD without WUE 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 Employment ADD without WUE 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 51 Demand without WUE 5,348 5,428 5,458 5,488 5,517 5,541 5,564 5,588 5,612 5,635 5,654 5,673 5,691 6,074 7,745 Demand with WUE 5,410 5,422 5,433 5,445 5,450 5,456 5,461 5,467 5,472 5,473 5,473 5,474 5,849 7,493 Demand without WUE 11,629 11,803 11,867 11,932 11,997 12,048 12,099 12,150 12,202 12,253 12,294 12,334 12,375 13,208 16,841 Demand with WUE 11,764 11,789 11,814 11,839 11,851 11,863 11,875 11,886 11,898 11,899 11,900 11,901 12,718 16,292 Demand without WUE 16,995 17,249 17,343 17,438 17,532 17,607 17,681 17,757 17,832 17,907 17,966 18,026 18,085 19,302 24,612 Demand with WUE 17,191 17,228 17,265 17,302 17,319 17,336 17,354 17,371 17,388 17,390 17,391 17,393 18,586 23,810 Average Day Demand (gpm) Peak Hour Demand (gpm) Maximum Day Demand (gpm) Description Projected Water Service Area Population Data Demand Basis Data (gal/day/capita) CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) The analysis and evaluation of the existing water system with proposed improvements, as presented in Chapters 7 and 9, is based on the 2038 projected demand data without WUE reductions. This ensures that the future system will be sized properly to meet all requirements, whether or not additional water use reductions are achieved. However, the City will continue to pursue reductions in water use by implementing the WUE Program contained in Appendix E. Table 4-13 presents the existing and projected ERUs of the system. The ERU forecasts are based on the projected water demands from Table 4-12 and the 6-year rolling average demand per ERU that was computed from actual 2011 through 2016 data. The projected water demand and ERU data from Tables 4-12 and 4-13 are also shown graphically in Chart 4-7. Chart 4-7 will be used in Chapter 7 to compare demand projections with source of supply availability. Table 4-13 Future ERU Projections Actual 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2038 2068 (+10 yrs)(+20 yrs)(+50 yrs) ADD without WUE 5,348 5,428 5,458 5,488 5,517 5,541 5,564 5,588 5,612 5,635 5,654 5,673 5,691 6,074 7,745 5,410 5,422 5,433 5,445 5,450 5,456 5,461 5,467 5,472 5,473 5,473 5,474 5,849 7,493 Demand per ERU without WUE 172 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 171 Total System ERUs 44,854 45,828 46,079 46,330 46,580 46,779 46,978 47,177 47,377 47,577 47,735 47,892 48,049 51,283 65,392 Equivalent Residential Units (ERUs) Projected Demand Data (gpm) ADD with WUE ERU Basis Data (gal/day/ERU) Demand per ERU with WUE Description CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-19 Chart 4-7 Future Water Demand and ERU Projections 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 2016 2018 2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 2032 2034 2036 2038 Equivalent Residential Units (ERUs)Maximum Day Demand (gpm)Maximum Day Demand without WUE Maximum Day Demand with WUE ERU CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS The City understands that projections of precipitation patterns due to long-term trends in climate conditions indicate potential impacts to the availability and reliability of drinking water supplies the ability to meet future demands. RH2 has performed a literature review to document climate change projections and estimate their impact on the City’s source vulnerability and future demand projections. CLIMATE CHANGE PROJECTIONS In 2013, the University of Washington’s Climate Impact Group released a report titled Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation in Washington State. This report is cited by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) as a source for their own projections of climate change impacts on drinking water in Washington State. In summary, this report projects the following major quantitative climatic changes in Washington State pertinent to water system planning. • The average annual surface air temperature is estimated to increase between 4.3°F and 5.8°F by the end of 2060. This increase depends on projected future greenhouse gas emissions and is relative to the temperatures measured between 1950 and 1999. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) • The average number of days with more than 1 inch of precipitation is estimated to increase between 6 and 20 percent by the end of 2060. This increase depends on projected future greenhouse gas emissions and is relative to precipitation records between 1971 and 2000. • The average April 1st snowpack volume is estimated to decrease between 38 and 46 percent by the end of 2050 for low and medium greenhouse gas emission scenarios. This decrease is relative to the snowpack records between 1916 and 2006. • The average sea level is estimated to rise between 4 inches and 56 inches by the year 2100. This increase depends on projected future greenhouse gas emissions and is relative to sea level recorded in 2000. The report also projects the following qualitative impacts specific to water resources management. • Decreasing summer minimum stream flows and increased potential for more frequent summer water shortages, especially in fully allocated watersheds with little management flexibility. • Increasing average and peak stream temperatures. • Widespread changes in streamflow timing and flood risk compared to historical trends. • Higher rates of water-borne diseases, primarily from increased flooding. Perhaps the most significant impacts to water purveyors from projected climatic changes would be the projected declining snowpack volume and changes in streamflow timing and summer minimum flows. Effects to streamflow timing vary from basin to basin and depend on the proportion of precipitation that falls as snow versus rain as follows. • Rain-Dominant Basins: In watersheds with warmer winter temperatures where less than 10 percent of winter precipitation falls as snow, streamflow peaks during the winter months and atmospheric warming is projected to have minimal effect on peak streamflow timing in unregulated basins. However, changes in intensity of precipitation could alter reservoir operations and storage availability to accommodate sudden stormwater events that would fill reservoirs. Streamflows in regulated basins may become more extreme despite the availability of reservoir regulation to mitigate these extremes. • Mixed Rain and Snow Basins: Middle elevation watersheds near the current snowline where between 10 percent and 40 percent of winter precipitation falls as snow are the most sensitive to projected atmospheric warming. In these basins, peak streamflow is projected to shift significantly earlier in the season by weeks to months, as wet season precipitation falls as rain instead of snow. • Snow-Dominant Basins: In watersheds with cold winter temperatures where more than 40 percent of winter precipitation currently falls as snow, peak streamflow will shift earlier in the season from early summer to spring as early and late wet season precipitation falls as rain instead of snow. Permanent reduction of glacial ice volume will also affect stream flow in high altitude watersheds. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-21 In the Green River Watershed, which supplies the City of Tacoma and serves as an emergency source for the City of Kent through its Second Supply Pipeline, winters are cool and much of the precipitation falls in the form of snow during winter months1. The watershed can most likely be generalized as a “mixed rain and snow basin” or “snow dominant basin.” The City of Tacoma would have some ability to mitigate projected shift in peak streamflow timing through operation of the Eagle Creek Reservoir and is preparing for earlier and later peak streamflows. However, the dam is operated to capture extreme winter precipitation volumes, release them safely to the Green River, then drain the reservoir for the next event. If the reservoir captures and releases a greater percentage of the annual volume of precipitation to mitigate flooding, less water would be available for capture and storage for potable supply. SOURCE VULNERABILITY IMPACTS The City’s water is supplied predominantly by groundwater sources recharged by annual precipitation, and the City’s supply appears more resilient against changes in streamflow timing, declining snowpack, and water quality than other water systems that rely on surface water sources. The inherent slow filling, persistent storage, and slow draining characteristics of aquifer replenishment offers some degree of protection against summer water availability if the volume and location of winter precipitation still results in sufficient aquifer recharge. The relationship between precipitation and aquifer recharge is complex and local. Impacts to the City’s groundwater sources depend on the precise characteristics of rainfall patterns, surface and subsurface permeability, pathways of infiltration into the aquifer, and locations and volumes of groundwater withdrawal. Urbanization and increased groundwater withdrawals from the source aquifers are significant factors partially or unrelated to changes in precipitation timing and temperature that could negatively impact the reliability of the City’s groundwater sources. It is notable that the University of Washington Climate Impact Group indicated that nearby Tacoma Water’s average water supply reliability is expected to decrease (worsen) between 63 percent and 96 percent under projected low and medium greenhouse gas emission scenarios by 2080. This forecasted decrease in reliability is assumed to result from earlier snow melt and decreased summer flows. This forecast also assumes no new sources of supply and no changes to current operating procedures. A system reliability of 100 percent indicates that no water shortage exists; as reliability decreases, the probability of a water shortage occurring increases. The source study indicates Tacoma Water’s supply is robust through 20302, so the City has some time to further evaluate and mitigate its risk due to changes in surrounding watersheds. The City may consider performing a detailed hydrogeologic study to improve awareness and management of aquifer recharge and withdrawals to mitigate potential changes in rainfall patterns and recharge. DEMAND IMPACTS The University of Washington Climate Impact Group reports high confidence that air temperatures will increase over time, but low confidence in how precipitation amounts will 1 Tacoma Public Utilities. August 13, 2008. Green River Watershed Management Plan, Second Volume. 2Vano, J.A., Voisin, N., Cuo, L., Hamlet, A.F., McGuire Elsner, M., Palmer, R.N., Polebitski, A., Lettenmaier, D.P. April 27, 2010. Climate Change Impacts on Water Management in the Puget Sound Region, Washington State, USA. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) change in time and location. Natural year-to-year variations in precipitation are expected to overprint any incremental changes attributed to climate change processes. There is a clear correlation between temperature, precipitation, and water system demand, but increases in demand are assumed to be caused primarily by the lack of precipitation in the summer and corresponding need for irrigation. Temperature increases alone are expected to have a less significant effect on demand, as most commercial, industrial, and residential uses will not increase solely due to temperature (e.g., showering, laundry, cooking, etc.) As lack of sufficient precipitation is assumed to be the primary driver of summertime demand increases, but there is low confidence in how climate change will impact precipitation patterns and volumes, it is difficult to estimate how climate change could impact demand. As a comparison benchmark, the University of Washington Climate Impact Group noted that Seattle Public Utilities’ water system demand is projected to increase by 1 percent in 2025, 2 percent in 2050, and 5 percent in 2075 due to climate change and warming atmospheric temperatures. This increase is relative to demands in 2000. To predict how demand could be impacted by changes in temperature and precipitation, historic correlations between demand, temperature, and precipitation are helpful. Chart 4-8 presents the relationship between temperature at Sea-Tac International Airport and the City’s total water supplied each month from 2011 to 2016. Chart 4-8 City of Kent Supply and Sea-Tac International Airport Temperature (2011 through 2016) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 Temperature ( F)Monthly Supply (MG)Supply Average Average Temperature at Sea-Tac Airport Average Max Temperature at Sea-Tac Airport 2011 Max Annual Temperature: 87 F 2012 Max Annual Temperature: 94 F 2013 Max Annual Temperature: 93 F 2014 Max Annual Temperature: 96 F 2015 Max Annual Temperature: 95 F 2016 Max Annual Temperature: 95 F Chart 4-8 illustrates the pattern of summertime supply peaks that correlate with increased temperatures. It should be noted that even though temperature and demand tend to peak at the same time, years with higher maximum annual temperatures do not necessarily have higher water CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER DEMANDS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) 4-23 demands than other years. This reinforces the assumption that, while temperature and demand correlate, increased temperatures alone do not necessarily cause increased demands. Chart 4-9 presents the relationship between precipitation measured at Sea-Tac International Airport and the City’s total water supplied between 2011 and 2016. Chart 4-9 City of Kent Supply and Sea-Tac International Airport Precipitation 2011-2016 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 400 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Precipitation (in)Consumption (MG)Total Precipitation at Sea-Tac Airport Supply 2011 Total Annual Precipitation: 36.4" 2012 Total Annual Precipitation: 48.3" 2013 Total Annual Precipitation: 32.6" 2014 Total Annual Precipitation: 48.5" 2015 Total Annual Precipitation: 44.9" 2016 Total Annual Precipitation: 45.2" Chart 4-9 illustrates the pattern of summertime supply peaks that correlate with decreased precipitation. There is also some correlation evident year-to-year, as water demands tend to be lower in years with more precipitation and higher in years with less precipitation compared with the years immediately following and preceding (with 2016 as the only exception). Ultimately, the degree to which the City’s future water demands will be impacted by climate change are a function of both expected warming and the expected change in precipitation patterns. As climate forecast models improve and changes to precipitation patterns can be forecast with more certainty, the City will further evaluate how demands are impacted by temperature and precipitation. Until that time, the City plans to use the same climate change-related increases that are projected for Seattle Public Utilities on an average day demand basis: a 1 percent increase in 2025; 2 percent in 2050; and 5 percent in 2075. The future demand projections based on these climate change-related increases are shown in Table 4-14 with the demand projections without estimated reductions in water use from achieving WUE goals or changes in irrigation habits or practices, for reference. The analysis and evaluation of the existing water system with proposed improvements, as presented in Chapters 7 and 9, is based on the 2038 projected demand data without WUE reductions and without climate change increases. However, the City will continue to evaluate the projected warming and changes in precipitation patterns and will update the demand projections to include climate change increases in the future as necessary. CHAPTER 4 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 4-24 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH4.DOC (9/30/2019 12:26 PM) Table 4-14 Future Water Demand Projections with Consideration for Climate Change Actual 2016 2028 2038 2068 (+10 yrs)(+20 yrs)(+50 yrs) Residential Population 68,157 71,842 74,166 82,705 Employment Population 64,755 69,777 77,653 114,053 Demand with Climate Change Increase 5,348 5,717 6,121 7,933 Demand without WUE or Climate Change Increase 5,691 6,074 7,745 Demand with Climate Change Increase 11,629 12,430 13,309 17,249 Demand without WUE or Climate Change Increase 12,375 13,208 16,841 Demand with Climate Change Increase 16,995 18,166 19,450 25,208 Demand without WUE or Climate Change Increase 18,085 19,302 24,612 Average Day Demand (gpm) Maximum Day Demand (gpm) Peak Hour Demand (gpm) Description Water Service Area Population Data Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-1 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT 5 | REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Establishing realistic design criteria is required to satisfy Washington State Department of Health (DOH) planning requirements, to evaluate the existing water system’s adequacy, and to plan for future water system improvements. The minimum design criteria for the City of Kent (City) water system are in accordance with the standards and requirements set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), DOH, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and for the water service area outside the City limits (in unincorporated King County) in accordance with the land use and planning guidelines of King County. These standards are consistent with the DOH Group A Public Water Systems Waterworks Standards, the South King County Coordinated Water Supply Plan (SKC CWSP) Design and Construction Standards, and King County’s Rules and Regulations relating to Fire Hydrants and Water Mains as authorized under King County Ordinance 5828. In some instances, the City Standards may be more stringent and/or restrictive than the requirements of other agencies, in which case the City Standards shall apply. Water system facilities constructed within the water service area must also be designed and constructed according to City Standards. The minimum criteria put forth herein do not replace or supersede the City’s Construction Standards, Developer Extension requirements or other codes and requirements associated with development proposals and permits. The City’s most current Construction Standards are contained in Appendix G and have been utilized in this summary of design criteria. The Construction Standards can also be found on the City’s website. The City’s standards and minimum design criteria accommodate anticipated maximum daily demands (MDD), as well as the demands on the system for peak hour, fire flow and other emergency situations. Minimum design criteria are established for water supply, storage volume, distribution and transmission main capacity and water quality standards. The criteria are used to determine existing deficiencies in the water system and projected water system requirements for the planning area described previously in this document. Chapter 7 summarizes the analyses performed on the system and identified deficiencies in meeting the needs of the current and projected customers of the system. This Chapter also discusses the City’s project review procedures for both public works and developer extension projects and describes policies and requirements for outside parties. A discussion of the City’s construction standards, construction certification, and construction follow-up procedure is also provided. REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS Public Law 93-523, the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish minimum national drinking water standards limiting the amount of potentially harmful substances which may be present in drinking water sources. These limits are regulated by the State of Washington Department of Health and adhered to by the City of CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Kent. Complete details of current regulations are contained in Chapter 6 and the City’s water quality monitoring program is provided in Appendix I. Because of the listing of the Puget Sound Chinook Salmon and Bull Trout as a “threatened species,” rules and regulations under the authority of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) can affect water system operations. As part of its ESA compliance program, the City operates consistent with best management practices as appropriate to protect endangered species. STATE OF WASHINGTON REQUIREMENTS The rules and regulations regarding public water supplies are a part of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) and are adopted pursuant to the provisions in the Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 43.20.050 for the protection of public health. The rules and regulations provide the minimum standards for design, construction, operations and maintenance of public water systems and conform with the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 and all subsequent amendments thereto. The Growth Management Act (GMA) of 1990 (RCW 36.70A) has a direct impact on utility system planning by requiring a complete inventory of existing system facilities and a comprehensive effort toward determining the capability of utility systems to support anticipated growth and a plan to finance capital facilities. The GMA requires cities and counties to discuss and plan for seven key elements in their comprehensive plans: (1) Land Use, (2) Housing, (3) Capital Facilities, (4) Utilities, (5) Transportation, (6) Economic Development, and (7) Parks and Recreation. A primary outcome of the growth management planning in King County is the delineation of an Urban Growth Area (UGA) boundary within which an urban level of service is required. GMA rules and regulations will be crucial to projecting future water demands. Because much of the Retail Water Service Area for the City of Kent is within the UGA, as discussed in Chapter 3, the pressure for growth will remain substantial. In addition, the City is required to plan for the provisions of an “urban level of service” because it serves within the UGA. Regulations related to accounting practices for municipalities such as the City of Kent are implemented and monitored by the State of Washington Auditor. Kent maintains a long-term system inventory program utilizing computerized mapping, equipment inventor y and a Geographical Information System (GIS). These programs have assisted in compliance with Government Accounting Standards Bureau statement 34 requirements and have been a key element in development of this WSP. DOH’s “Water System Design Manual” is the primary document governing the sizing and design of public water systems in the State of Washington. This publication sets forth the minimum system plan and reliability considerations. Criteria for distribution system design, water storage and daily supply requirements are summarized in this Chapter. KING COUNTY REQUIREMENTS Because a portion of the Retail Water Service Area is within unincorporated King County, the City must operate within the rules and regulations established by King County for these areas and utilize County planning data in developing growth projections for areas outside the City limits. Specifically, the King County Comprehensive Plan has a direct impact on the planning effort. King County Code Titles 13.24 (Sewer and Water Comprehensive Plans), 14, 21A, and 17.08, as well as Countywide Planning Policies and King County Comprehensive Plan Policies related to water utilities, have been utilized in the development of this document to ensure that water system operations and construction CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-3 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT standards are in conformance with King County requirements. The City must also operate within the terms of its current right-of-way franchise with King County. CONDITIONS OF WATER SERVICE The City of Kent currently provides water service to customers within its established service area boundary. Additionally, the City maintains metered interties with the City of Renton, the City of Tukwila, Highline Water District, the City of Auburn, Lake Meridian Water District, and Soos Creek Water and Sewer District. Service area policies such as developer extension requirements, fee payment responsibilities, design standards and related issues are governed by the Kent City Code and the City of Kent Construction Standards. FIRE FLOW REQUIREMENTS The Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-230(6) states the following requirement for public water distribution systems: “If fire flow is to be provided, the distribution system shall also provide maximum day demand (MDD) plus the required fire flow at a pressure of at least 20 psi (140 kPa) at all points throughout the distribution system, and under the condition where the designated volume of fire suppression and equalizing storage has been depleted.” In accordance with DOH requirements, the Kent City Code defines “Fire Flow” as the measure of the sustained flow of available water for fighting fire at a specific building or within a specific area at 20 psi residual pressure. The City’s fire flow requirements are shown in Table 4-11. SOURCE REQUIREMENTS SOURCE QUANTITY The City will plan for at least 20 years into the future so that future water resource limitations can be handled effectively. The City will ensure that the capacity of the system, including wells, pump stations, storage, and transmission mains, is sufficient to meet the maximum day demands of the system. The City will participate in regional supply management and planning activities as staff resources allow. WATER QUALITY STANDARDS The City will pursue steps to meet or exceed all water quality regulations and standards. Security of the water supply is of primary importance. The City will take all reasonable measures to protect its system and customers. Security improvements identified in vulnerability assessment reviews shall be given the highest priority. Chapter 6 identifies the existing water quality standards that the city’s water system must comply with. CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT PERMIT EXEMPT WELLS Those applicants within Water Resource Inventory Areas (WRIAs) 8 and 9 without constructed wells, and submitting building permits reliant on use of a permit-exempt well (RCW 90.44.050) after January 19, 2018, are subject to its terms and limitations. Such applicants shall be limited to a maximum annual average withdrawal of 950 gallons per day (gpd) per connection. This amount may be reduced to 350 gpd for indoor use only during drought conditions. The quantitative and other limitations associated with Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6091 shall remain in effect until a watershed restoration and enhancement plan is approved by Ecology and implementing rules are adopted. In order to secure building permits, applicants located within the City’s corporate boundaries shall be required to pay the City a fee of $500, $350 of which is to be transmitted to Ecology. The City is required to record relevant water use restrictions with the property title. Ecology is recommending that local jurisdictions located within Hirst-affected basins adopt the following recording language: “Domestic water use at this property is subject to a water use limitation of a maximum annual average withdrawal of 950 gallons per day, per connection, subject to the 5,000 gallon per day limit provided in RCW 90.44.050.” GENERAL WATER MAIN REQUIREMENTS PIPELINE VELOCITIES During normal demand conditions, the velocity of water in a water main should be less than 5 feet per second (fps). During emergency conditions, such as a fire, and for design purposes, the velocity of water in a water main may exceed 5 fps, but may not exceed 8 fps except in existing 6- or 8-inch dead-end water main serving residential areas. New dead-end water main installed within residential areas may be approved for a maximum velocity of 10 fps on a case-by-case basis by the City. WATER MAIN EXTENSIONS • All water main extensions shall conform to the design requirements of the City and DOH. • This WSP indicates the location and configuration of the major elements of the existing and proposed City supply mains, distribution system, interties and loops. The exact location or configuration of this system may be modified, provided the proposed system remains consistent with the overall intent of the WSP. • Mainline extensions will be required when properties do not front on a water main or when the existing main is deemed inadequate for the proposed use. It is a City policy that the water main is extended to the far edge of the property to be serviced, regardless of where the service connection is to be made. WATER SYSTEM DESIGN PARAMETERS • Desirable system working pressure shall be approximately 60 to 70 psi, but not less than 35 psi under Peak Hourly Demand (PHD). The minimum pressure in the water system under fire flow conditions shall be 20 psi. • Individual service Pressure Reducing Valves (PRVs) shall be installed and maintained on water service lines, by the property owner, when system pressures are in excess of 80 psi. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-5 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • All new mains providing fire flow will be sized to provide the required fire flow at a minimum residual pressure of 20 psi and maximum pipeline velocity of 8 fps during maximum day demand conditions. In general, new water mains that will carry fire flow in residential areas shall be a minimum of 8 inches in diameter and looped for multi-family residential developments. Exceptions in residential areas may be considered as discussed in the Velocity section of this chapter. New water mains in commercial, business park, industrial, and school areas shall be a minimum of 12 inches in diameter and looped. • Connections to existing water mains shall be accomplished by “Extension,” “Wet Tap” or “Cut In” when mainline valves are required on the existing main. Connection to the existing main shall be per City Standard. No direct connection to the City’s existing water system will be allowed until purity and leakage tests of the new system have been performed and passed. • Two cubes for “Pigging” shall be installed in the new water main at the initial connection and at each lateral from the new water main. The Water Division will provide the cubes, they must be picked up by the contractor at the Water Division Shop. • Dead end mains shall be avoided whenever possible. Where dead end mains are unavoidable, a minimum two (2) inch blowoff assembly is required. Blowoff sizes for various pipe diameters are listed in the City of Kent Construction Standards. WATER MAIN LOCATION • Water mains shall be laid at least ten (10) feet horizontally from any existing or proposed sanitary sewer. The distance shall be measured edge-to-edge. Any deviation from this requirement shall meet Ecology and DOH requirements and be allowed only upon approval of the Director. • Perpendicular water main crossings of sanitary sewers shall be laid to provide a minimum vertical distance of eighteen (18) inches above the sewer line, measured from the bottom of the water line to the top of the sewer line. Where separation between the water line and sewer line is less than eighteen (18) inches, the sewer line shall be ductile iron. All sanitary sewer lines which cross above a water main, regardless of the separation, shall be ductile iron as well, with no joints within a nominal ten (10) feet of the water main. • Installation of water mains near other potential sources of contamination will require written approval by the Director on a case by case basis. They would include but not be limited to; storage ponds, land disposal sites for wastewater or industrial process water containing toxic materials or pathogenic organisms, solid waste disposal sites, or any other facility where failure of the facility would subject the water in the main to toxic chemical or pathogenic contamination. • Water mains shall be located at least five (5) feet away from any other utility, including but not limited to storm drains, power, natural gas, CATV, private fire lines, etc. VALVES Water valves are required at the following locations: • Four hundred (400) foot maximum intervals in commercial/industrial and multi-family residential areas. Locations involving hospitals, medical clinics, and other uses determined by the City of Kent to be critical applications may be required to have intervals reduced. • Eight hundred (800) foot maximum intervals in residential areas. CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • All sides of mainline tees and crosses. • At all water service, fire line, and hydrant connections to the City main. • At both sides of all bridge crossings, railroad crossings and casing/bores. Existing gate valves may be subject to replacement with a new resilient wedge gate valve or a new resilient wedge gate valve installed at the property line per City of Kent Construction Standards at the discretion of the Director. COMBINATION AIR/VACUUM RELEASE VALVES Combination air/vacuum release valves shall be located at high points along the main. As a guide, valves are necessary where the difference between high and low points is two (2) feet on a gradual rise, or any abrupt rise. Actual locations should be in accordance with good engineering judgement and approved by the Director. The air inlet/discharge opening shall be thirty six (36) inches above finished grade and provided with a screened downward facing vent opening. It shall be located outside of traffic areas and installed to prevent damage to landscaping and pedestrians. BLOWOFFS Blowoffs shall be located at the dead end of all mains for flushing and “pigging” purposes. Blowoff assemblies must be sized and designed to achieve a minimum velocity of 2.5 fps in the water main. These velocities are to be used as a guideline and do not relieve the Contractor from assuring a clean line. Two (2) inch is the minimum blowoff size. Where cubes for “pigging” are required in the main line installation, the blowoff size shall be four (4) inch for six (6) through eight (8) inch water mains and six (6) inch for ten (10) through twelve (12) inch water mains. Fire hydrants are preferred in lieu of blowoff devices where flows and pressures warrant a hydrant. Using water from blowoffs requires a use permit, meter and check valve assembly issued by the Water Division. Persons using water illegally will be prosecuted. FIRE HYDRANTS HYDRANT LOCATION Fire hydrant locations shall be reviewed and approved by the Fire Marshal prior to plan approval. In general, fire hydrants shall be installed at the following locations: • Will generally be located at street intersections. • Six hundred (600) foot maximum intervals in single family residential area. • Three hundred (300) foot intervals in multi-family and commercial areas. • Upstream of a fire line vault, if an existing public hydrant is not available at a location approved by the Fire Marshal. • At other locations as directed by the Fire Marshal. HYDRANT CONNECTIONS Connections to the existing main shall be as follows: • Hydrant leads shall be Class 52 ductile iron. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-7 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • Hydrant leads shall not exceed fifty (50) feet in length. • Wet tap connection with heavy-duty tapping sleeve and resilient wedge tapping valve is required. • No service connections are allowed to hydrant leads. • Using water from hydrants requires a use permit, meter and check valve assembly issued by the Water Division. Persons using water illegally will be prosecuted. HYDRANT ASSEMBLIES Fire hydrant assemblies shall be as follows per City Standard: • Assemblies shall be shackled on runs eighteen (18) feet or less, or restrained with an approved type of mechanical restrained joint on runs longer than eighteen (18) feet, to the mainline. • Public fire hydrants shall be painted white. • Private fire lines require an approved backflow protection assembly to be installed and to be located on private property. • Private fire hydrants shall be painted yellow. CROSS-CONNECTION CONTROL There shall be no cross connection whatsoever between the City water distribution system and any unapproved pipes, wells, pumps, private hydrants, tanks, non-potable fluid or any other contaminating materials that may backflow into the water system. The City’s Cross-Connection Control Program is contained in Appendix F. BACKFLOW PREVENTION The degree of public health protection required must be commensurate with the degree of hazard presented. In situations of known or potential physical or toxic health hazards, air gap separation and/or reduced pressure backflow assemblies shall be required. Double check valve assemblies are generally utilized where aesthetic or detrimental effects on water quality may occur. Each water system connection has unique problems arising from location, climatic conditions, service demands, and other factors. Consequently, each cross-connection shall be examined on an individual basis and the City shall make the final determination as to the degree of backflow protection required. Backflow protection assemblies proposed for use can be found on the current list of approved assemblies by the Washington State Department of Health. All backflow assemblies are required to be tested annually by a Washington State certified backflow assembly tester. Copies of inspection reports shall be provided to the City. The City of Kent has codified its cross connection control program requirements, which can be found in Kent City Code chapter 7.02.050 – 7.02.105. These requirements are further detailed in the City’s cross connection control program. PREMISE ISOLATION Where the City determines protection of the public water distribution system is necessary, a Backflow Preventer shall be installed at the property line commensurate with the degree of hazard as defined in WAC 246-290-010. Installation of Air Gaps shall be approved by submitted drawings in CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT accordance with the latest edition of the Cross Connection Control Manual, Pacific Northwest Section AWWA and the latest edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code. Double Check Valve Assembly and Reduced Pressure Backflow Assembly installations shall be in accordance with Standard Details 3-14 through 3-18 in the City’s Construction Standards. IRRIGATION SYSTEM Cross-connection protection is required for all irrigation systems. In general, the City requires Double Check Valve Assemblies to be used. If a chemical injection irrigation system were to be installed, a Reduced Pressure Backflow Assembly would be required. Both types of installations require freeze protection. DEDICATED FIRE LINES Cross-connection protection is required for all Dedicated Fire Lines. In general, the City requires Double Check Detector Assemblies be used. If chemical additive is used or there is an auxiliary water supply available to the system, a Reduced Pressure Detector Assembly is required. STORAGE REQUIREMENTS Storage requirements are based on four components: Operational Storage, required to maintain sufficient storage for pump operation; Equalizing Storage, required to supplement production from water sources during periods of high demand; Standby Storage, required as a backup supply in case the largest source is out of service; and, Fire Storage, required in order to deliver fire flow for the required duration. The minimum amount of storage required shall be the total combined amount of the operational, equalizing, standby, and fire storage. Chapter 7 provides a complete analysis of the City’s water storage requirements and capacities. OPERATIONAL STORAGE Operational storage is the volume of water available to supply the system under normal operating conditions while the source is considered “off”. This volume varies according to the sensitivity of the water level sensors controlling the pumps or other supply source and the configuration of the tanks designed to provide the required volume while preventing excessive cycling of the pump motor(s). EQUALIZING STORAGE The volume of equalizing storage must be sufficient to meet hourly water system demands in excess of the rate of supply and must be at an elevation sufficient to meet these demands at a minimum delivery pressure of 30 psi. STANDBY STORAGE Standby storage is required in order to augment the available supply of water during a period of restricted flow from the supply source. Restriction of flow may be caused by a pumping equipment failure, supply line failure, maintenance or repair, or other condition which causes interruption in the supply. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-9 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT FIRE FLOW STORAGE Fire flow storage must be equal to the amount of water required to accommodate the maximum fire demand under a specified duration of time. Fire flow requirements are determined by the City Fire Marshal and Table 4-11 puts forth the minimum fire flow requirements used for analysis purposes in this water system planning effort. Fire flow storage must be located above an elevation that yields a 20 psi service pressure to all services in the zone under maximum day demand conditions. DEAD STORAGE Dead storage is the amount of water not available at the minimum design pressure to the highest elevation served by the storage facility. TELEMETRY SYSTEMS Telemetry systems must be compatible with the City’s existing SCADA system. The system must provide discrete status, continuous analog reporting, and control capability which is both sending and receiving. It must also have an integral backup power supply able to sustain communication for a 24-hour period. BACKUP POWER REQUIREMENTS Backup power shall be provided at all sources or pumping stations which are required to be operational during power failures in order to meet system reliability requirements, or to continuously maintain a positive distribution system pressure. PROJECT REVIEW PROCEDURES Depending on the project type, the City employs two different procedures to review proposed improvement projects. Project types include public works projects and developer extension projects. The review procedure for each project type is discussed in the following sections. PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS Projects that require public works contracts must be developed and reviewed as part of a water system planning effort. Public works projects must be identified based on either a water system or water quality analysis. For this planning effort, the water system analysis is described in Chapter 7, and the water quality requirements are discussed in Chapter 6. Projects that are identified based on these analyses have subsequently be assessed and prioritized relative to each as described in Chapter 9. Several considerations are given to assess proposed public works projects. The following considerations are those recommended by DOH. • Health Standards. The project must conform with and support all applicable regulations and standards. • Land Use. The project must conform with and support applicable plans and policies. • Quantity. The adequacy of a future water source resulting from the improvement project must be evaluated. CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • Reliability. The amount of increase to system reliability based on the improvement project should be evaluated with respect to the system’s desired level of reliability. • Costs. The project’s capital costs should be evaluated along with annual operation and maintenance costs. • Regional Benefit. The project’s ability to help meet regional goals (e.g., multi-purpose benefits such as flood control and recreation), in addition to meeting local water system needs, should be reviewed. • Environmental Effects. If the project could create detrimental environmental impacts, these impacts need to be defined. In addition, an assessment should be made to determine whether the negative impacts can be mitigated. • Flexibility. The project’s responsiveness to changed land use, water demand, and other resource management decisions should be evaluated. The potential for phased implementation should also be considered. • Implementation. The project’s potential to be publicly accepted, easily designed, constructed, and financed should be reviewed. • Life Expectancy. The project’s expected duration of operation should be estimated. • Risk. The risks of selecting and not selecting the project for implementation should be assessed, considering health risks, economic risks, and reliability of service. • Operation and Maintenance. The ability to operate, maintain and make connections and repairs to the facility in a cost-effective manner. DEVELOPER EXTENSION PROJECTS Developer extension water projects are primarily limited to distribution main improvements. These developer-funded projects do not have to be explicitly reviewed by DOH and discussed within the context of a water system plan. They only have to be implicitly included in the water system plan by including the City design and construction standards required for these projects. These standards in included in Appendix G. Any extension, addition or modification of the City water system are permitted via a Civil Construction Permit with the City. Civil Construction Permits are also required for the construction of plat improvements required by the subdivision code, construction of new streets or (excluding private service connections) within public rights-of-way or easements, or any utility installation that the City has determined must be owned and operated by the City. Upon review of the proposed development, the Director of Public Works shall make the determination of when a mainline extension is required and the extent of improvements necessary. The procedure to receive Development Extension Approval is as follows: • The developer or his agent shall meet the Director of Public Works or his designated representative to verify the extent of improvements required. Compliance with the appropriate Comprehensive Plans and the procedure to complete a developer extension agreement with the City will be discussed at the meeting. Water or sewer extensions outside the City Limits, but within the City’s franchise area, may require approval of the King County Boundary Review Board prior to extension. If Boundary Review Board approval is required, a meeting with the City of Kent Property Manager is necessary to discuss the procedures. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-11 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • The developer shall retain a civil engineer registered in the State of Washington to prepare the engineering plans, specifications and cost estimates for the mainline utility and/or street improvements. The engineering plans shall conform to the general criteria and standards as outlined in the Design and Construction Standards. • Design plans are submitted to the Permit Center for review with a Civil Construction Permit Application and the appropriate review fees. • Following review and approval of the design plans by the Director of Public Works, the developer shall secure all necessary outside agency approvals. After all necessary permits and approvals have been secured and verified, and all documents (i.e. warranty, bonds, easements, insurance…) and fees as required by the City have been submitted, a preconstruction meeting with the appropriate Public Works staff is scheduled. Following construction completion, the following must be submitted: • As built plans prepared by a Professional Land Surveyor registered in the State of Washington must be submitted. • Bill of Sale. • Addendums to the Bill of Sale. • City Inspector’s Preliminary Project Approval. • Final walk-thru field inspection of the completed public improvements is scheduled with the City's Project Engineer, contractor, inspector and the Operations Division. A punch list is prepared and upon completion of this punch list, the contractor must notify the inspector for final acceptance of the constructed improvements. • The Public Works Department will then schedule the project on the Council agenda for official City and Council acceptance of the public improvements. Upon acceptance by the City Council, performance bonds and other cash bonds are then released upon submittal of the required maintenance bonds as outlined in the Developer's Extension Packet. LATECOMERS AGREEMENTS Any person who constructs a water, sewer, storm drainage or street extension at the direction of the City, in excess of that which is required to meet minimum standards or which meets minimum standards and will benefit properties abutting the new improvements may, with the approval of the Director of Public Works, enter into a contract with the City which will allow the Developer to be reimbursed for that portion of the construction cost that benefits the adjoining properties and/or is in excess of the minimum standard. The format for a Latecomers Agreement must be submitted for review and approval by the City prior to plan approval to be considered. The City shall be reimbursed for all costs associated with the review and approval of the Latecomers Agreements. The developer is responsible for preparing the Latecomers Agreement for City review and approval. The City will be responsible for recording the Latecomers Agreement. The Agreement shall include a list of those properties which will benefit from the improvements, a map outlining and designating these properties, legal descriptions as required by the City, and backup data supporting the costs submitted. The City will collect the Latecomers Fee from persons wanting to connect or use said public improvements and subsequently sees that the developer receives the payment. CHAPTER 5 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 5-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT UTILITY CONNECTION PERMITS DUTY TO SERVE The City has a duty to provide service to all new connections within the retail service area when the circumstances meet the following four threshold factors: • The City has sufficient capacity to serve water in a safe and reliable manner. • The service request is consistent with local plans and development regulations. • The City has sufficient water rights to provide service. • The City can provide service in a timely and reasonable manner. The time-period starts for measuring timely and reasonable service when the water service application is first submitted to the City. The following section provides additional details regarding the City’s duty to serve policies. A reasonable water service request meets the Duty to Serve requirements, is consistent with City Code Section 7, and meets the Permit Requirements outlined in the following section. PERMIT REQUIREMENTS The connection of private services to the City of Kent Utility System requires the issuance of the following permits: • Water Meter Permits - Prior to the construction of a domestic water service, the owner or authorized agent, shall obtain a Water Meter Permit from the City. Permits will not be issued for connection to a new main until the system is ready for Council acceptance (except for projects where multiple buildings are approved for phased occupancy). For large, new developments, no permits will be issued until As-builts are in, walk-thru inspections are completed and the Bill of Sale is Council ready. • Fire Hydrant Permit - Prior to the installation of a public fire hydrant, the owner/agent shall obtain a Fire Hydrant Permit from the City and approval of the location from the City Fire Marshal. • Fire Line Connection Permit – Prior to the connection of a Fire line to the City water main, the owner/agent shall obtain a Fire Line Connection Permit from the City. • Private Fire Line Permit – Prior to the installation of a private sprinkler system, private fire line and/or private fire hydrant(s), the owner/agent shall obtain a Private Fire Line Permit from the City Fire Marshal. In addition, a Backflow Assembly Permit shall be obtained if approved backflow prevention is not provided on the private fire line. Additional licenses are required by the Washington State Fire Marshal’s Office for these installations. • Outside Agency Permits - In addition to the permits listed above, the developer is responsible for securing and abiding by the conditions imposed by permits required by outside agencies. These permits include County and State DOT right-of-way permits, Hydraulic Permits, Shoreline Permits, Corps of Engineers, Department of Fisheries Permits, etc. • King County right-of-way permit - For water extensions in King County right-of-way, the Owner shall obtain a King County right-of-way permit prior to the preconstruction meeting. Conditions and requirements set forth by the County shall comply with King County Road Standards. The City and the Contractor must schedule and attend a preconstruction meeting with King County right-of-way inspection staff prior to starting any work. Permit and CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM DESIGN CRITERIA Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH5.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:33 PM) 5-13 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Inspection Fees charged to the City by the County will be billed to the Contractor or owner in full. All construction and restoration must be completed to the satisfaction of the County and City. • Deduct, Water Use Only, and Backflow Assembly Permits - Prior to the installation of a water use only, deduct meter and Backflow assembly the owner/agent shall obtain a Water Service Permit from the City. • Water system capacity will be evaluated at the time of water service application. The City will use the capacity analysis contained in Chapter 7 of this WSP to evaluate source of supply, storage, and water rights capacity available to the applicant. • Water system capacity, pressure, and fire flow will be considered when providing water availability to applicants. • Water availability shall expire at the time that the associated permit expires (i.e., land use, site civil, or building permit). • Time extensions in regard to water availability shall be granted in accordance with the associated permit requirements. When extensions are denied, the disputes are handled through the rules guiding the associated permit process. Disputes can be brought to the City Council for discussion. TEMPORARY WATER SERVICE In accordance to City Code Section 7.02.180, when water service is required for a specific short-term duration, upon approval by the director of public works, a temporary water meter may be obtained from the water utility. Such meters shall only be used for a designated project and shall be promptly returned to the water utility upon completion of the project or at the end of sixty (60) days, whichever comes first. The meters are to be returned in the same condition as when rented, and the user shall be held responsible for any damage thereto including paying all repair or replacement costs. While in the user’s possession, the user shall be solely responsible for the meter and as such, should it be lost or stolen, the user shall pay the water utility the cost of its replacement. The Director of Public Works shall require that a cash bond be deposited with the City prior to receipt of a temporary meter. The amount of the bond shall equal the replacement cost of the respective meter. Upon return of the meter, and following the payment of all outstanding charges including any meter repair or replacement costs, the cash bond shall be released back to the user. Temporary meters may be moved from one hydrant to another within the same project; provided, the water utility is notified in advance of the proposed relocation and that hydrant wrenches are used to make all connections and disconnections. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.docx (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-1 6 | WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY INTRODUCTION The two basic objectives of a municipal water supply system are to provide a sufficient quantity of water to meet customer usage demands and to provide high quality water. Chapter 7 discusses the City’s ability to supply a sufficient quantity of water and identifies future source requirements. This chapter discusses the City’s existing water sources, water rights, water quality regulations, and water quality monitoring results. EXISTING WATER SOURCES AND TREATMENT WATER SOURCES The City is served by multiple groundwater and surface water/spring sources located within and outside its water system service area. They include Clark Springs (including Rock Creek), Kent Springs, East Hill Well(s), Garrison Creek Well, Armstrong Springs Wells, Seven Oaks (Soos Creek) Well, Summit Well, O’Brien Well, 208th Street Well, and 212th Street Wells. The groundwater sources of supply are served by aquifers that underlie the Green and Cedar River basins and fall within and outside the City's water service area and City limits. In 1985, the City contracted with Tacoma Public Utilities (TPU) and became a partner in the Tacoma Regional Water Supply System (RWSS). This project delivers water from the Green River watershed to the City’s Water Service Area. At this time, these sources are responsible for meeting all of the City's existing and projected water supply demand. Kent Source Aquifers – Overview The main aquifer within the Green River Valley is the recent alluvial aquifer (Qal) that occurs within the Pacific/Algona/Auburn areas, and in the Renton area. The Qal aquifers generally occur at depths of less than 100 feet, are unconfined, and are in hydraulic continuity with multiple surface water systems (White, Green, and Cedar Rivers). Aquifer recharge is from direct infiltration through the land surface, and lateral groundwater inflow from deeper aquifers in the adjacent uplands. Natural aquifer discharge is to the above-mentioned rivers. The Qal aquifer within the Renton area (6 miles north of the City) is very productive, with well yields that typically exceed 1,000 gallons per minute (gpm). The Qal aquifer within the Algona/Pacific/Auburn area (6 miles south of the City) is moderately productive, with well yields on the order of 500 gpm. Water resources in these aquifers are used by several jurisdictions, including the Cities of Pacific, Auburn, Renton, and Algona. The Qvr aquifer occurs within the Auburn area at depths of 30 to 40 feet below ground surface to as much as 250 feet below ground surface. The aquifer is very productive given its high permeability and abundant recharge, both from the surface and the surrounding uplands. The aquifer discharges naturally to the Green River. The characteristics of the Qvr aquifer (extent, thickness, transmissivity, etc.) are well-defined from previous studies by the City of Auburn. No significant aquifers have been identified within the Green River Valley in the Kent area. The Qvr aquifer also occurs within the southeast portion of the Covington Uplands. The aquifer serves as a source of supply to the major spring sources that serve the City (Kent, Clark, and Armstrong CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Springs). The aquifer is shallow and unconfined; recharge is relatively high due to the coarse-grained nature of the surficial soils and underlying geology, and the abundant precipitation that falls on the area. Natural aquifer discharge is to tributaries such as Jenkins Creek and Rock Creek, which discharge to Soos Creek and the Cedar River, respectively. The Qva aquifer occurs primarily on the western portion of the Covington Uplands. Low-permeability glacial till overlies the aquifer and limits the amount of direct recharge from precipitation (Bauer and Mastin, 1997). Well yields are moderate to low, but the aquifer serves many domestic wells and is the source of supply for most of the wells serving Lake Meridian Water District. Natural discharge from the Qva aquifer occurs to the headwaters of Big Soos Creek. The Qc2 aquifer occurs throughout much of the Covington Uplands. In many areas it can be difficult to distinguish the Qc2 aquifer stratigraphically from the overlying Qva aquifer. Glacial till overlies large portions of the aquifer, limiting the amount of natural recharge from direct precipitation. The Qc2 aquifer serves as a major source of supply in the east Covington Uplands near Lake Sawyer, and appears to be in hydraulic communication with the north/northeastern end of the lake. Natural discharge from the aquifer occurs primarily to the lower reaches of Soos Creek. The Qc3 and Qc4 aquifers occur within the Kent area near the valley wall and within other localized areas of the Covington Uplands (e.g., at the City’s Seven Oaks Well). The aquifers are relatively productive near the City, with well yields that can exceed 1,000 gpm. These deep aquifers are confined beneath the Covington Uplands and receive their recharge as regional-scale downward leakage through the confining aquitard layers. Natural discharge from aquifers that outcrop in the major river valley walls is in the form of springs and seeps that feed the surface rivers. The deeper aquifers (at or below sea level) may discharge naturally to deep valley-filling sediments or through upward leakage across confining aquitard layers in the valley margins. Rates of leakage are usually low, giving rise to good degrees of confinement, as evidenced by artesian water levels in some of the wells located at lower elevations. There is a general absence of deep well information within the Covington Uplands that might be expected to reveal lateral extensions of these aquifers to the east. Deeper exploratory wells (greater than 500 feet deep) that have been drilled at Kent Springs, and within the Lake Meridian Water District and Covington Water District areas, typically penetrate a thick sequence of fine-grained deposits (clays and silts) with a consistent absence of appreciable water-yielding horizons at depth. Bedrock occurs at shallower depths in the north and east parts of the Covington Uplands, limiting the potential lateral extent of any unidentified deep Qc3 or Qc4 aquifers. Kent Source Aquifers – Reliability As noted above, five aquifer systems exist in the Covington Uplands area, all of which are presumed to be part of a larger, hydrostratigraphic unit. The City’s largest groundwater sources, including Kent, Clark, and Armstrong Springs, are located in the shallower aquifer system (i.e., Qvr aquifer) situated within the Covington Uplands, which flows or discharges to both the Green and Cedar Rivers. Upstream of Clark Springs, the groundwater flows east to west; however, at Clark Springs the flow pattern splits, with groundwater discharge going to both the Green and Cedar Rivers. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-3 The groundwater split that feeds Clark Springs has been determined by King County, the City, and Ecology to discharge to Rock Creek, which is tributary to the Cedar River. The groundwater flowing towards the Green River flows past the City’s Kent Springs and Armstrong Springs wells. This same water flows toward Lake Sawyer, which discharges into Covington Creek, which in turn discharges into Soos Creek, which is tributary to the Green River. Kent Springs also has been determined to flow at times into Jenkins Creek, which also flows into Covington Creek and the Green River. With the exception of one seasonal water right (irrigation of River Bend Golf Course), all of the City’s water rights authorize continuous, annual withdrawals of its authorized quantities. Clark Springs The Clark Springs Water Supply System is located off of Kent-Kangley Road in a protected, partially fenced, greater than 320-acre section of the Rock Creek watershed (RM 1.8). This property, which is geographically separate from the City of Kent proper, was annexed to the City in 1958 for municipal water supply purposes. The balance of the area falling outside of the City’s annexed property is bounded and regulated by the City of Maple Val ley on the west, and unincorporated King County to the north, south, and east. Substantial development activity with related increases in impervious surface area and installation of over 300 exempt wells have been allowed to occur within the Rock Creek watershed over the past 30 years. Nevertheless, that portion of the watershed falling within the City’s property remains largely in pristine condition. The Clark Springs Water System is used on a continuous basis throughout the year and is comprised of three separate, but conjunctively managed sources: Clark Springs Trench; Rock Creek Surface Water Diversion; and Clark Springs Wells. Each of these sources draw upon the same shallow aquifer source (Qvr) and are in hydraulic continuity with each other. The City’s Clark Springs Trench is located near Kent-Kangley Road, east of the Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road. Rock Creek flows through the property in a westerly-northwesterly direction and is tributary to the Cedar River. Water is collected in the infiltration gallery, which is constructed of approximately 500 feet of perforated steel pipe placed perpendicular to Rock Creek, across a narrow valley of glacial till, and extending under the streambed. The collection system and the transmission line were constructed in 1957. Water collected by the gallery system has been determined by the City’s hydrogeologic studies to come from the Qvr aquifer, which is the same aquifer source used by the City’s Clark Springs Wells and the Kent Springs Water System, as well as the Armstrong Springs Wells at a lower hydraulic gradient. The design of the Trench infiltration gallery allows the simultaneous withdrawal of water under the Trench water right and the Rock Creek surface water right. This design also allows the City, when appropriate, to limit diversions allowed under its Rock Creek surface water rights (although use of this right is not subject to minimum in-stream flow conditions). In such circumstances, the production of instantaneous and annual quantities authorized under the Rock Creek water right may be voluntarily reduced and shifted to the Trench. This conjunctive management approach assists the City in meeting system demands in a reliable and continuous manner, while protecting in-stream flow conditions in Rock Creek. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Given the close hydraulic connections among the Clark Springs sources, the City has found it most effective from a production and environmental protection standpoint to operate these sources in a conjunctive manner, whereby the instantaneous and annual withdrawals of the system are limited to the cumulative totals allowed under the combined Clark Springs System surface water, springs, and groundwater rights (i.e., 5,400 gpm – Qi, and 8,710 acre-feet per year (afy) – Qa). Current and future operation and management of the Clark Springs Wells, water rights, and overall water supply system facilities are required to occur consistent with the City’s Habitat Conservation Plan, Incidental Take Permit, and related Habitat Conservation Plan Implementation Agreement. Due to the close proximity of the Clark Springs sources to the Landsburg Mine Site (Site), the City has advised Ecology of the City’s serious concerns regarding the adequacy of the agency’s environmental oversight of the Site, and the risk of a contamination event originating from the Site that results in the temporary or permanent loss of the Clark Springs Water Supply System. To this end, the City has submitted to Ecology comments in opposition to its cleanup action plan for the Site, seeking further investigation/action at the Site and a cleanup action plan more protective of area groundwater, including the Clark Springs source aquifers. The City also has implemented various activities to increase monitoring and sampling at and near Clark Springs. Kent Springs The Kent Springs source is located near Black Diamond. The City owns approximately 75 acres at this site. This property has been annexed into the City for municipal purposes. The site is segregated by Cran-Mar Creek, which flows through the property in a westerly direction. Prior to the incorporation of Maple Valley in 1997, and recent annexations by the City of Black Diamond, the Kent Springs Water System property was surrounded by unincorporated King County. Today, Kent Springs is bounded by Maple Valley to the north and east, Black Diamond to the south, and unincorporated King County to the west. Because the City does not regulate land use outside of its Kent Springs Water System property, the City’s ability to affect land uses potentially affecting the recharge area for these wells, has been and remains limited. The Kent Springs Water System is comprised of three wells and a spring fed infiltration gallery. Both sources withdraw supply from the same shallow Qvr aquifer, identified by hydrogeologic studies as the aquifer that also serves the Clark Springs System at a higher hydraulic gradient. Due to their close hydraulic connection, the Kent Springs Wells/spring sources are operated in a conjunctive manner to maximize instantaneous and annual withdrawal capacity. Armstrong Springs The Armstrong Springs Wells are located at State Route 516 (Kent-Kangley Road), and east of Wax Road. Both wells withdraw water downstream from the same shallow Qvr aquifer system that serves the Clark and Kent Springs Systems. During its 1998 Phase 1 wellhead protection program study, the City determined that water not captured by the Clark and Kent Springs Systems flows to the Armstrong Springs sources; therefore, the three sources are considered hydraulically connected. North Kent Wellfield The water rights originally issued for the 208th Street, 212th Street, and Garrison Creek Wells were changed by the City several years ago to allow for that water to be pumped from any of CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-5 those wells (the wells are recognized as all tapping the same body of public groundwater). Consequently, from a practical operational and regulatory standpoint, the well sources operate as a wellfield. These wells draw water from a confined aquifer that originates beneath the Covington Uplands to the east and extends beneath the Green River Valley to the west. The 208th Street and 212th Street Wells are flowing artesian in nature. They have an artesian shut-in pressure of approximately 15 to 20 pounds per square inch during the off-season. The 208th Street, 212th Street, and Garrison Creek Wells are hydraulically connected, as pumping of one well will result in a drop in static artesian pressure of the others. Also, the water quality (i.e., manganese and iron) conditions are somewhat similar in all wells. East Hill The East Hill Wells, both the 104th and 108th Avenue SE sites, are located along the eastern rim of the Kent Valley. The aquifer shows seasonal water level fluctuations, with the lowest static water levels occurring in the summer and fall months. These fluctuations can reduce the production available from the current active well. Remaining Sites The remaining City well sites are all within the City limits on the Covington Uplands, east of the Green River Valley. The exception being the River Bend Golf Course irrigation wells, which are drilled in the Green River Valley near the western valley margin. Additional information on each of the City’s existing potable sources is presented in Chapter 2. ROCK CREEK PROTECTION/CLARK SPRINGS WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM Rock Creek is considered an important spawning ground for the Cedar River sockeye salmon, a stock that is recognized as depressed (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, et al., 1994). The extent of historic use of Rock Creek by Chinook salmon is uncertain, and recent use has been infrequent and unlikely to include any actual spawning. Rock Creek is used by Coho salmon for spawning. Because of Rock Creek’s outstanding natural habitat and its role in supporting the Clark Springs Water System, the City has a substantial and ongoing interest in preserving the health and vitality of the Rock Creek watershed. To that end, in 1997, the City installed a streamflow augmentation system that, depending on the aquifer levels, can supply up to 900 gpm (2.0 cubic feet per second (cfs)) of water to be discharged into Rock Creek (Figure 1-3) during low flow periods when listed salmonid species are spawning. The flow augmentation system operates by pumping water from the clearwell in the Clark Springs System, from which it is then discharged to Rock Creek after aeration. The water available for flow discharge is subject to hydrologic conditions affecting the infiltration gallery. This system is operated periodically, especially when streamflows fall below 3 cfs during the October, November, and December salmonid spawning periods. Augmentation reduces the instantaneous amount of water available for the municipal water supply by the amount pumped to the stream. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) The flow augmentation project described above was just one of the resource protection measures the Public Works Department implemented both prior and subsequent to the City’s 2002 Water System Plan Update. Those measures include: 1) promoting responsible resource protection measures by governmental agencies and private parties within the Rock Creek basin; 2) sustained and effective monitoring of flow and aquatic habitat conditions; 3) improving flow and aquatic habitat conditions in Rock Creek; and 4) substantially minimizing/avoiding adverse operational effects upon listed species and aquatic habitat. The listings of salmon and trout stocks in the Puget Sound Region (1998) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) resulted in a decision by the Kent City Council on January 8, 2001, to notify the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) of the City’s intent to voluntarily formalize its conservation activities under a Habitat Conservation Plan, and in so doing, obtain an Incidental Take Permit under Section 10(a)(1)(B) of the ESA for the operation of its Clark Springs Water Supply System (CSWSS) located adjacent to Rock Creek. CLARK SPRINGS HABITAT CONSERVATION PLAN In 2001, the City undertook efforts to prepare a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) in support of the City’s application for an Incidental Take Permit (ITP) in conformance with Section 10(a)(2)(A) of the ESA. The text of the HCP, which required over 6 years of studying and planning to prepare, was completed by the City in December 2010. The HCP was the product of a collaborative effort between the City and the federal fishery Services (Services), including the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service, to meet the requirements of the ESA, domestic, industrial, and commercial water supply demands, fire flow requirements, and other related public safety needs of the City. In more specific terms, the accomplishment of the HCP represents a long-term commitment by the City to protect important fish resources that may be impacted by future operations of the Clark Springs System and to mitigate those potential impacts to the maximum extent practicable. With the HCP’s completion, the City formalized its voluntary efforts to conserve and enhance important fish and wildlife habitat on the site and elsewhere in the Rock Creek basin. The final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HCP was prepared by the Services in spring of 2011. On September 6, 2011, NMFS issued an ITP to the City, which shall be in effect until September 25, 2061. The ITP allows the City to operate its existing and proposed water supply operations in a lawful manner without threat of prosecution for incidental take that may occur to species covered by the ITP. An HCP Implementation Agreement was executed by USFWS, NMFS, and the City on September 26, 2011. Implementing the HCP consistent with the ITP shall ensure that City activities to provide municipal water supply within its service area will include measures that benefit fish resources, in particular ESA-listed species such as bull trout and Chinook salmon, over both the short- and long-term. To this end, The City is currently in the process of designing, permitting, and constructing Habitat Conservation Measures (HCMs) outlined in the HCP. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-7 WATER TREATMENT All City water sources are chlorinated and fluoridated. In 2015, the Tacoma Green River filtration facility was completed, allowing for less-constrained use of the Tacoma supply. Aeration and sodium hydroxide pH adjustment are used at the Guiberson Reservoir site to treat blended Kent Springs and Tacoma RWSS water. The City also uses pH adjustment at the 212th Street Treatment Plant, Pump Station #5, and the East Hill (104th Avenue SE) Well. WATER RIGHTS EXISTING POTABLE WATER RIGHTS AND INTERTIES The City currently holds 23 water rights that provide its potable and non-potable municipal water supply. In total, the City’s water rights authorize a total instantaneous withdrawal rate (Qi) of 23,458 gpm or 33.8 million gallons per day (MGD), and a total annual withdrawal volume (Qa) of 19,885.6 afy (17.75 MGD). Within that total number of rights, the City holds one (1) water right claim and twenty-two (22) water right certificates. In addition, the City has water available from the City of Tacoma RWSS. A summary of the water rights and water sources is presented in Table 6-1, and the principal water right documents are contained in Appendix H. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Table 6-1 Existing Water Rights and Interties The City’s water rights and water sources will be discussed based on location. All water rights divert or withdraw water from Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 9 – Duwamish-Green, except for those water rights associated with the Clark Springs site, which is located in WRIA 8 – Cedar-Sammamish. Ecology issued metering order DE 02WRNR-3754 dated April 1, 2002 to the City (Appendix H). This administrative order requires the City to install and maintain an approved measuring device on all points of diversion or withdrawal under almost all of its water rights. The two water rights that were not explicitly included were GWC 767-A (O’Brien) and GWC 1957-A (Chappelear). The meters need to be read weekly with the data submitted to Ecology on an annual basis (by January 31 of the following year). Additive Non-additive Additive Non-additive SWC 7232 10/14/1931 Cert Municipal Clark Springs 2,244 0 3,600 0 GWC 3107-A 2/18/1957 Cert Municipal Clark Springs 2,250 0 1,350 0 GWC 7660-A 2/4/1969 Cert Municipal Clark Springs 906 4,494 3,760 4,950 G1-123225CL 5/1/1909 L.F. Claim Municipal Kent Springs 4,488 0 965 0 G1-22956C 9/2/1977 Cert Municipal Kent Springs 3,690 0 5,904 0 G1-24189C 10/6/1982 Cert Municipal Armstrong Springs 1,300 0 0 500 G1-23614C 6/4/1980 Sup. Cert Municipal North Kent Wellfield 500 0 0 800 G1-24190C 10/6/1982 Sup. Cert Municipal North Kent Wellfield 2,700 0 0 1,400 G1-24404C 8/24/1983 Sup. Cert Municipal North Kent Wellfield 1,200 0 0 600 GWC 42-D 9/1/1923 Cert Municipal East Hill (104th)60 0 90 0 GWC 44-A 9/12/1945 Cert Municipal East Hill (104th)90 0 135 0 GWC 2890-A 9/12/1956 Cert Municipal East Hill (104th)120 0 146 0 G1-23285C 1/4/1979 Cert Municipal East Hill (104th)1,900 0 3,040 0 GWC 651-A 3/23/1948 Cert Municipal East Hill (108th)60 0 42 0 GWC 2428-A 2/25/1953 Sup. Cert Municipal East Hill (108th)120 0 78.4 0 GWC 767-A 1/18/1951 Sup. Cert Municipal O'Brien 243 0 45 0 G1-24073C 4/26/1982 Cert Municipal Soos Creek (Seven Oaks)900 0 0 864 GWC 1116-A 6/17/1950 Cert Municipal Summit 200 0 320 0 GWC 494-A 7/29/1947 Cert Municipal Hamilton Road 38 0 30 0 GWC 4534-A 5/4/1962 Cert Municipal Hamilton Road 12 0 19.2 0 G1-23713C 10/15/1980 Cert Municipal High Meadows 7 0 11 0 GWC 1957-A 3/24/1952 Cert Dom & Irr Chappelear 140 0 60 0 G1-25204C 3/25/1988 Cert Muni Irr River Bend Golf Course 290 0 290 0 23,458 19,885.6 8,778 14,159 32,236 34,044.6 Total City Water Rights Total Tacoma RWSS Combined Total Instantaneous Rate (gpm)Annual Volume (afy)Source LocationUseDocumentPriority DateWater Right CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-9 Clark Springs There are three water rights (Surface Water Certificate (SWC) 7232, Ground Water Certificate (GWC) 3107-A, and GWC 7660-A) authorizing one surface water diversion, one infiltration trench, and three wells associated with the Clark Springs site. Combined, these three water rights total 5,400 gpm and 8,710 afy, as limited by the most recently issued water right (GWC 7660-A). This site is the City’s only site located in WRIA 8 with Clark Springs draining into Rock Creek, which then drains into the Cedar River. Contrary to how these water rights have been depicted in the water right record and older water system plans, with the older two water rights being shown as being non-additive on both an instantaneous and annual basis, it is believed that the more accurate and proper way to display these water rights is shown in Table 6-1. This interpretation does not change the overall instantaneous rate or annual volume that can be withdrawn or diverted from any particular source at the Clark Springs site, but it more accurately represents the history of the water rights with the most junior water right placing an overall limit on both the instantaneous rate and annual volume that can be withdrawn. GWC 7660-A contains minimum instream flow limitations for a control point located where Rock Creek crosses the Kent-Kangley Road at the downstream edge of the site. The flow in Rock Creek must be at or above the minimum levels as measured at that location, or else withdrawal of water under this water right must be stopped. The minimum instream flow levels for Rock Creek throughout the year are 15 cfs from January 1 through May 1, then decreasing arithmetically to 2 cfs by July 1, remaining at 2 cfs through October 31st, then 15 cfs from November 1st through December 31st. Diversion and withdrawal under the two older water rights (SWC 7232 and GWC 3107-A) are not subject to these minimum instream flow restrictions. The City monitors stream conditions for the purposes of protecting fish and related aquatic habitat consistent with the HCP, in order to minimize/avoid potential adverse operational effects. During low flow events or seasonal conditions, the City may meet its current demand requirements by shifting its withdrawal of authorized, and required, quantities to its infiltration trench system. Current and future operations and management of the Clark Springs site are required to occur consistent with the City’s HCP, ITP, and related HCP Implementation Agreement. Surface Water Certificate SWC 7232 SWC 7232, with a priority date of October 14, 1931, authorizes the diversion of a total of 5 cfs (4,488 gpm) for year round domestic supply from Rock Creek in the S ½ Section 26, Township 22 North, Range 6 East W.M., in WRIA 8. No annual volume limitation was specified, which was common practice at the time. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in July 1958. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Pursuant to beneficial use of the water consistent with RCW 90.03.015, SWC 7232 qualifies as for municipal water supply purposes. Ground Water Certificate GWC 3107-A GWC 3107-A, with a priority date of February 18, 1957, authorizes the withdrawal of a total of 2,250 gpm and 1,350 afy for year round municipal supply from an infiltration trench located in CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) the S ½ Section 26, Township 22 North, Range 6 East W.M., in WRIA 8. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in July 1958. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Ground Water Certificate GWC 7660-A GWC 7660-A, with a priority date of February 4, 1969, authorizes the withdrawal of a total of 5,400 gpm and 8,710 afy under all of the City’s Clark Springs site water rights, for year round municipal supply. This water right specifically authorizes withdrawal of water from three wells located in the S ½ Section 26, Township 22 North, Range 6 East W.M., in WRIA 8. This water right was granted subject to minimum instream flows for Rock Creek as measured at a point on the downstream side of the site. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in March 1972. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Kent Springs There are two water rights (Ground Water Claim G1-123225CL and certificate G1-22956C) authorizing diversion from the springs (infiltration gallery/trench) under the claim and three active wells under the certificate associated with the Kent Springs site. Combined, these water rights total 8,178 gpm and 6,869 afy. As will be discussed later, a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form was filed recently with Ecology to get Kent Springs Well #3 (completed in April 2001 with Unique Well ID AEC886) authorized under the water right certificate. Ground Water Claim G1-123225CL This ground water claim was filed on a long-form. G1-123225CL, with a claimed first date of use of May 1, 1909, claims a withdrawal of 10 cfs (4,448 gpm) and 965 afy for year round municipal supply from a spring located in the SE ¼ SW ¼ and SW ¼ SE ¼ Section 33, Township 22 North, Range 6 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The claim was filed by the City of Kent in June 1974. No changes have been made to this claim since it was filed. Ground Water Certificate G1-22956C G1-22956C, with a priority date of September 2, 1977, authorizes the withdrawal of a total of 3,690 gpm and 5,904 afy for year round municipal supply from two wells located in the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 33, Township 22 North, Range 6 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in February 1979. No changes have been made to this claim since it was filed. Armstrong Springs There is one ground water certificate (G1-24189C) and two active wells associated with the Armstrong Springs site. The water right is for 1,300 gpm and 500 afy with the annual volume being non-additive to other City water rights. The well names have changed over time and what was originally referred to as Wells #A-4 and #A-5, are now referred to as Armstrong Wells #1 and #2, respectively. These two wells at this site have been recognized as a wellfield by DOH. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-11 Ground Water Certificate G1-24189C G1-24189C, with a priority date of October 6, 1982, authorizes the withdrawal of 1,300 gpm and 500 afy (non-additive) for year round municipal supply from two wells located in the E ½ NE ¼ Section 36, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in January 1986. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. North Kent Wellfield (208th Street, 212th Street, and Garrison Creek) There are three water right certificates (G1-23614C, G1-24190C, and G1-24404C) and six wells associated with this area that make beneficial use of these water rights. Originally, each well location in this area was covered by a single water right. In 2003, Ecology approved changes to each water right such that now each well location is included as an authorized point of withdrawal under each water right. During the 2003 changes, all three water rights were authorized to use the 208th Street Well, 212th Street Wells #1 and #2, and the Garrison Creek Well #1. These changes provide the City with flexibility when it comes to operating these wells. Combined, these water rights total 4,400 gpm and 2,800 afy with the annual volume being non- additive to other City water rights. There is currently 1 well (active) at the 208th Street location, 3 wells (all active) at the 212th Street location, and 2 wells (1 active and 1 inactive) at the Garrison Creek location. As will be discussed later, Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms were filed recently with Ecology to get 212th Street Well #3 (completed in May 2001 with Unique Well ID AFR915) and Garrison Creek Well #2 (completed in February 2004 with Unique Well ID AFT320) authorized under all three water rights. The Garrison Creek Well #1 was damaged in the 2001 Nisqually Earthquake, an attempt was made to redevelop the well in 2003, but that effort failed. The failure of Garrison Creek Well #1 is what drove construction of Garrison Creek Well #2. Ground Water Certificate G1-23614C G1-23614C, with a priority date of June 4, 1980, authorizes the withdrawal of 500 gpm and 800 afy (non-additive) for year round municipal supply from four wells located in the NE ¼ SE ¼ and SE ¼ NW ¼ Section 7 and the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 6, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. A superseding certificate was issued to the City of Kent in September 2013, subsequent to Ecology’s approval of a water right change application. The original certificate had been issued to the City of Kent in May 1983 for municipal supply from Garrison Creek Well #1. Ground Water Certificate G1-24190C G1-24190C, with a priority date of October 6, 1982, authorizes the withdrawal of 2,700 gpm and 1,400 afy (non-additive) for year round municipal supply from four wells located in the NE ¼ SE ¼ and SE ¼ NW ¼ Section 7 and the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 6, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. A superseding certificate was issued to the City of Kent in September 2013, subsequent to Ecology’s approval of a water right change application. The original certificate had been issued to the City of Kent in April 1993 for municipal supply from 212th Street Wells #1 and #2. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Ground Water Certificate G1-24404C G1-24404C, with a priority date of August 24, 1983, authorizes the withdrawal of 1,200 gpm and 600 afy (non-additive) for year round municipal supply from four wells located in the NE ¼ SE ¼ and SE ¼ NW ¼ Section 7 and the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 6, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. A superseding certificate was issued to the City of Kent in September 2013, subsequent to Ecology’s approval of a water right change application. The original certificate had been issued to the City of Kent in April 1993 for municipal supply from the 208th Street Well. East Hill (104th Avenue SE) The East Hill (104th Avenue SE) site consists of four ground water certificates (GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, GWC 2890-A, and G1-23285C). The combined total authorized by these water rights is 2,170 gpm and 3,411 afy. The City acquired the water system and East Hill (104th Avenue SE) wells water rights from the original owner in 1978 during annexation of the area into the City. When acquired, the East Hill (104th Avenue SE) water rights were used to supply a water system that was serving more than 15 residential connections. Subsequent to their acquisition, these water rights have been beneficially used for City water supply, consistently documented in the City’s water system plans, and expressly denoted in the City’s water rights portfolio and listing of the City’s water rights. Based on the definitions in the municipal water law (RCW 90.03.015), these water rights qualify as being for municipal water supply purposes. There are currently 5 wells (1 active, 1 unequipped, and 3 inactive) at the East Hill (104th Avenue SE) site. The active well is the East Hill Well #1 (originally authorized as a point of withdrawal under G1-23285C). The unequipped well is East Hill Well #2 (Unique Well ID AFT321) that was completed in June 2004, but has yet to be equipped and connected to the City’s distribution system. The three inactive wells were the original points of withdrawal under GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, and GWC 2890-A. As will be discussed later, Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms were filed recently to get the wells added to GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, and G1-23285C. The specifics of each water right will be discussed in this section. Ground Water Certificate 42-D GWC 42-D, with a priority date of September 1, 1923, authorizes the withdrawal of 60 gpm and 90 afy for year round domestic supply and watering livestock for community from a well located in Tract 20 of R.O. Smith Orchard Tracts, in Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the East Hill Community Well Company in March 1946. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Ground Water Certificate 44-A GWC 44-A, with a priority date of September 12, 1945, authorizes the withdrawal of 90 gpm and 135 afy for year round municipal supply from a well located in Tract 20 Smith’s Orchard Tracts, Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the East Hill Community Well Company in April 1947. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-13 Ground Water Certificate 2890-A GWC 2890-A, with a priority date of September 12, 1956, authorizes the withdrawal of 120 gpm and 146 afy for year round community domestic supply from a well located in Lot 1 of R.J. Bower’s Addition to King County of Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the East Hill Community Well Company in August 1957. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. There is currently no active well at the location specified, and the City has been making beneficial use of this water right from the East Hill Well #1 located in Tract 20 of R.O. Smith Orchard Tracts, in Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., through a de facto change. Ground Water Certificate G1-23285C G1-23285C, with a priority date of January 4, 1979, authorizes the withdrawal of 1,900 gpm and 3,040 afy for year round municipal supply from a well located in Block 20 R.O. Smith Orchard Tracts of Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This well is referred to as the East Hill Well #1. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in February 1982. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. East Hill (108th Avenue SE) The East Hill (108th Avenue SE) site consists of two ground water certificates (GWC 651-A, and GWC 2428-A). The combined total authorized by these two water right certificates is 180 gpm and 120.4 afy. There were historically 3 wells at the East Hills (108th Avenue SE) site (1 active and 2 inactive). As will be discussed later, a water right change will be filed on GWC 651-A to include the active well as an authorized point of withdrawal. The City acquired the water system and East Hill (108th Avenue SE) site water rights from the original owner in 1964 during annexation of the area into the City. When acquired, the East Hill water rights were used to supply a water system that was serving more than 15 residential connections. Subsequent to their acquisition, these water rights have been beneficially used for City water supply, consistently documented in the City’s water system plans, and expressly denoted the City’s water rights portfolio and listing of the City’s water rights. Based on the definitions in the municipal water law (RCW 90.03.015), these water rights qualify as being for municipal water supply purposes. The well is currently operable, is run monthly to exercise the equipment, and serves as a back-up/standby water source that is not physically connected to the City’s water distribution system. In the event of a large-scale natural disaster that compromises the City’s water system, the well motor and pump can be operated with an on-site generator and can be used to pump water such that customers could travel to the site to receive potable water. The specifics of each water right will be discussed in this section. Ground Water Certificate 651-A GWC 651-A, with a priority date of March 23, 1948, authorizes the withdrawal of 60 gpm and 42 afy for year round community water supply from a well located in the NE ¼ NW ¼ Section CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 29, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the East Hill Water Co., Inc. in June 1951. No changes have been made to this certificated right since it was issued. There is currently no active well at the location specified and the City has been making beneficial use of this water right from the East Hill Well #1 located in Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., and from the 108th Avenue Well located in Section 29, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M. through a de facto change. Ground Water Certificate 2428-A GWC 2428-A, with a priority date of February 25, 1953, authorizes the withdrawal of 120 gpm and 78.4 afy for year round municipal supply from the 108th Avenue Well located in the NW ¼ NW ¼ NE ¼ Section 29, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. A superseding certificate was issued to the City of Kent in July 2015 after the City requested that Ecology conform the water right to recognize it as being for municipal water supply purposes. The original certificate had been issued to the East Hill Water Co., Inc. in December 1955 for domestic supply for community. Ground Water Claim G1-123227CL In addition to the ground water certificates, there is a ground water claim in the City’s name for this site as well. That claim is G1-123227CL. The claimed rate is 150 gpm and the claimed annual volume is 241 afy. The date of first use is identified as October 1964. Since October 1964 is after Chapter 90.44 RCW was established, it is assumed that this claim does not represent a vested right. For this reason, it is not included in the City’s water rights total. O’Brien There is one ground water certificate (GWC 767-A) for the O’Brien site, which has two (1 active and 1 inactive) wells. As will be discussed later, a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form was filed recently with Ecology to get the O’Brien Well #2 (Unique Well ID AEJ475) completed in September 1999, authorized under the water right. Ground Water Certificate 767-A GWC 767-A, with a priority date of January 18, 1951, authorizes the withdrawal of 243 gpm and 45 afy for year round municipal supply from one well located within Tract 27 of Shinn’s Cloverdale Addition to Kent Section 7, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. A superseding certificate was issued to the City in July 2015 after the City requested that Ecology conform the water right to recognize it as being for municipal water supply purposes. The original certificate had been issued to the O’Brien Water Users Association, Inc. in September 1951 for domestic supply of community. Ground Water Claim G1-123226CL In addition to the ground water certificate, there is a ground water claim in the City’s name for this site. That claim is G1-123226CL. The claimed rate is 60 gpm and the claimed annual volume is 96.5 afy. The date of first use is identified as February 1959. Since February 1959 is after Chapter 90.44 RCW was established, it is assumed that this claim does not represent a vested right. For this reason, it is not included in the City’s water rights total. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-15 Soos Creek (Seven Oaks) There is one ground water certificate (G1-24703C) and one active well associated with the Soos Creek (Seven Oaks) site. Ground Water Certificate G1-24073C G1-24073C, with a priority date of April 26, 1982, authorizes the withdrawal of 900 gpm and 864 afy (non-additive) for year round municipal supply from one well located within SW ¼ NW ¼ Section 28, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in November 1984. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Summit There is one ground water certificate (GWC 1116-A) and one active well associated with the Summit site. The active well has been redeveloped to correct a sanding issue. The well is currently operable, is run monthly to exercise the equipment, and serves as a back-up/standby water source that is not physically connected to the City’s water distribution system. In the event of a large-scale natural disaster that compromises the City’s water system, the well motor and pump can be operated with an on-site generator and can be used to pump water such that customers could come to the site to receive potable water. Ground Water Certificate 1116-A GWC 1116-A, with a priority date of June 17, 1950, authorizes the withdrawal of 200 gpm and 320 afy for year round municipal supply from one well located within Lot 11, Block 4 of City View Addition to Kent, Section 19, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in July 1952. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Hamilton Road There are two ground water certificates (GWC 494-A and GWC 4534-A) and two wells associated with the Hamilton Road site. Combined, these two water rights total 50 gpm and 49.2 afy. The City acquired the water system and water rights from the original owner in 1967 during annexation of the area into the City. When acquired, the water rights were used to supply a water system that was serving more than 15 residential connections. Subsequent to their acquisition, these water rights have been consistently documented in the City’s water system plans, denoted within the City’s water rights portfolio . Based on the definitions in the municipal water law (RCW 90.03.015), these water rights qualify as being for municipal water supply purposes. These water rights are being retained and managed by the City to meet future municipal demand. Ground Water Certificate GWC 494-A GWC 494-A, with a priority date of July 29, 1947, authorizes the withdrawal of 38 gpm and 30 afy for year round domestic supply for community from one well located within the NW ¼ SE ¼ Section 18, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) was issued to the Hamilton Road Community Water Company in November 1950. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Ground Water Certificate GWC 4534-A GWC 4534-A, with a priority date of May 4, 1962, authorizes the withdrawal of 12 gpm and 19.2 afy for year round community domestic supply from one well located within the N ½ NE ¼ NW ¼ SE ¼ Section 18, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the Hamilton Road Community Water Company in June 1963. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. High Meadows There is currently one ground water certificate (G1-23713C) and one well associated with the High Meadows site. This water right is being retained and managed by the City to meet future municipal demand. Ground Water Certificate G1-23713C G1-23713C, with a priority date of October 15, 1980, authorizes the withdrawal of 7 gpm and 11 afy for year round municipal supply from one well located within the NE ¼ SW ¼ NW ¼ Section 17, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent in November 1984. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Chappelear There is one ground water certificate (GWC 1957-A) and one well at the Chappelear site. This water right is maintained as a standby water supply source for the City. This water right is being retained by the City to meet future municipal demand. Ground Water Certificate GWC 1957-A GWC 1957-A, with a priority date of March 24, 1952, authorizes the withdrawal of 140 gpm and 60 afy for year round domestic supply and irrigation of 30 acres from one well located in the NE ¼ SW ¼ Section 4, Township 21 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to Harry M. Chappelear in August 1954. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. Tacoma Regional Water Supply System The City is authorized to take up to 12.64 million gallons per day (MGD) (equal to 8,778 gpm and 14,159 afy) from Tacoma’s RWSS as a partner. The water right utilized by the City of Tacoma for this water supply is surface water permit S1-00726P. S1-00726P is classified as an interruptible water right as it contains a provision requiring that diversion can only occur when minimum instream flows are met in the Green River at USGS gage 12106700. The minimum instream flows for normal and critical years are outlined in the permit as well as in WAC 173-509-030. Over the past several years, the City has evaluated how Tacoma RWSS water could be used to provide source water for a proposed aquifer storage and recovery well at Lakehaven’s CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-17 Optimization of Aquifer Storage for Increased Supply (OASIS) project. Water stored during the winter would be used to meet summer peaking and emergency standby/reliability standard requirements. PENDING POTABLE WATER RIGHT APPLICATIONS The City has two water right applications for additional municipal potable water supply pending before Ecology. Potable Applications Ground Water Application G1-27619A G1-27619A, with a priority date of May 22, 1995, requests the withdrawal of 1,200 gpm and 500 afy for year round municipal supply from two wells located within the E ½ SW ¼ Section 4, Township 21 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This application remains pending in Ecology’s water right application processing queue. Ground Water Application G1-27620A G1-27620A, with a priority date of May 22, 1995, requests the withdrawal of 7,000 gpm and 6,496 afy for year round municipal supply from three wells located within the SE ¼ SE ¼ Section 7 and SW ¼ SW ¼ Section 8, Township 21 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This application proposed to take water from wells in close proximity to the Green River during high flows for placement in storage and later use during high demand periods. This application remains pending in Ecology’s water right application processing queue. NON-POTABLE WATER RIGHTS HELD BY THE CITY The City holds one ground water certificate (G1-25204C) that is for purposes other than potable water supply. This water right is mentioned here due to its ownership by the City but is not included in any of the calculations when comparing the City’s water supply available to meet existing or future potable municipal demands. River Bend Golf Course The River Bend Golf Course is owned and operated by the City and the City has one water right and two wells (1 active and 1 inactive) at this location. Since this water right was issued to the City and is for a governmental or governmental proprietary purpose (irrigation of a golf course), under RCW 90.03.015(4)(b), the water right is considered to be for municipal water supply purposes. This water right is used exclusively for irrigation of the golf course and is not physically connected to the City’s potable water distribution system. As will be discussed later, a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form was filed recently with Ecology to get the River Bend Golf Course Well #2 (completed in August 2016 with Unique Well ID APP320) authorized under the water right. Ground Water Certificate G1-25204C G1-25204C, with a priority date of March 25, 1988, authorizes the withdrawal of 290 gpm and 290 afy for seasonal irrigation of 145 acres of the River Bend Golf Course from one well located CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) within the NE ¼ SE ¼ Section 22, Township 22 North, Range 4 East W.M., in WRIA 9. The original certificate was issued to the City of Kent Parks and Recreation Department in May 1990. No changes have been made to this certificate since it was issued. NON-POTABLE AND NON-CONSUMPTIVE WATER RIGHT APPLICATIONS HELD BY THE CITY The City has submitted three ground water applications (G1-27608A, G1-27778A, and G1-27914A) for non-consumptive streamflow augmentation of Mill Creek. These water right applications are included in this water system plan for completeness but are not included in any of the calculations when looking at the City’s water supply available to meet existing or future potable municipal demands. Mill Creek Streamflow Augmentation The goal of the proposed Mill Creek Streamflow Augmentation Project is to increase critically low summer base flows in Mill Creek by pumping shallow ground water and then aerating it prior to discharge into the stream. Mill Creek is one of the City’s major streams and experiences extremely low base flows (approximately 0.5 to 2.0 cfs) during the summer months. Primary benefits desired are to improved salmonid habitat by enhancing water quality and increasing available habitat by roughly doubling summertime streamflows. Ground Water Application G1-27608A G1-27608A, with a priority date of April 25, 1995, requests the withdrawal of 200 gpm and 100 afy for streamflow augmentation of Mill Creek during the low-flow season from one well located within the NW ¼ Section 19, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This application remains pending in Ecology’s water right application processing queue. Ground Water Application G1-27778A G1-27778A, with a priority date of November 7, 1996, requests the withdrawal of 750 gpm and 400 afy for streamflow augmentation of Mill Creek during the low-flow season from four wells located within the S ½ Section 11, Township 22 North, Range 4 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This application remains pending in Ecology’s water right application processing queue. Ground Water Application G1-27914A G1-27914A, with a priority date of May 1, 1998, requests the withdrawal of 100 gpm and 80 afy for streamflow augmentation of Mill Creek during the low-flow season from one well located within the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 1, Township 22 North, Range 4 East W.M., in WRIA 9. This application remains pending in Ecology’s water right application processing queue. PERMIT EXEMPT WELLS In 2016, the Washington State Supreme Court issued its decision in the case of Whatcom County v. Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board, 186 Wn.2d 648 (2016) (often referred to as the “Hirst” decision). In the Hirst case, the court determined that counties and cities could not issue building permits reliant on permit exempt wells in 15 Puget Sound basins if beneficial use of the proposed well could impact senior minimum flows and/or closed surface CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-19 waters – irrespective of whether an adopted instream flow rule allows such use. The City is located within WRIA 8 (Cedar – Sammamish) and WRIA 9 (Duwamish-Green), both of which are affected basins. As a consequence of the Hirst decision, local governments, including the City, were compelled to advise building permit applicants that the use of an exempt well to serve as a domestic water source may be subject to seasonal variations, curtailment, or other restrictions by Ecology, other agencies, or a court of law. In 2018, the Washington State Legislature passed ESSB 6091, which allows permit exempt wells constructed in Hirst affected basins prior to the Act’s effective date (January 19, 2018) to serve as proof of adequate domestic supply for a building permit. Such prior-Act wells constructed in these basins, including WRIA 15, in compliance with Chapter 18.04 RCW, are not subject to the new restrictions, limitations, and fees imposed by the Act. This is regardless of whether the well was put to beneficial use prior to January 19, 2018. Projects using permit exempt wells for non-domestic purposes are also not affected by the Act. Under the new law, those applicants within WRIAs 8 and 9 without constructed wells, and submitting building permits reliant on use of a permit exempt well (RCW 90.44.050) after January 19, 2018, are subject to its terms and limitations. Such applicants shall be limited to a maximum annual average withdrawal of 950 gallons per day (gpd) per connection. This amount may be reduced to 350 gpd for indoor use only during drought conditions. The quantitative and other limitations associated with ESSB 6091 shall remain in effect until a watershed restoration and enhancement plan is approved by Ecology and implementing rules are adopted. In order to secure building permits, applicants located within the City’s corporate boundaries shall be required to pay the City a fee of $500, $350 of which is to be transmitted to Ecology. The City is required to record relevant water use restrictions with the property title. Ecology is recommending that local jurisdictions located within Hirst affected basins adopt the following recording language: “Domestic water use at this property is subject to a water use limitation of a maximum annual average withdrawal of 950 gallons per day, per connection, subject to the 5,000 gallon per day limit provided in RCW 90.44.050.” WATER SUPPLY EVALUATION An evaluation of the City’s combined existing potable water rights (excluding the Riverbend Golf Course Municipal Irrigation Water Right G1-25204C) and Tacoma RWSS contract was performed to determine the sufficiency of the water rights to meet both existing and future water demands. Table 6-2 compares the combined maximum instantaneous water right/contract rates of the sources with the maximum day demand of the system, and the combined maximum annual water right/contract volume of the sources with the average day demand of the system. As shown in the table, the City has sufficient water rights (both instantaneous and annual amounts) to meet the demands of its existing customers. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Table 6-2 Existing Water Rights Evaluation Table 6-3 summarizes the results of the future water rights evaluation, which compares the water rights and contracts of the existing sources with the system’s future 10-year, 20-year, and 50-year demand projections. The analyses considered future demand projections with and without water use reductions from the City’s planned water use efficiency efforts, as shown in the table. The results of the future water rights evaluation indicate the City has sufficient water rights to meet the demands through the year 2066. Instantaneous Rights / Maximum Day Demand Description (gpm)(afy)(gpm) Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Existing (2016) Water Demand 11,629 8,627 5,348 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 20,317 25,128 15,578 Annual Rights / Average Day Demand CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-21 Table 6-3 Future Water Rights Evaluation RECENT WATER RIGHT ACTIONS Through the water system planning process, it was discovered that newer wells drilled at existing sites had not been added to the appropriate water rights as points of withdrawal. To rectify this problem, the City has submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms for the wells and water rights located at the sites identified in the following sections. Kent Springs Water right G1-22956C authorizes withdrawal from two wells (Kent Springs Wells #1 and #2). The public notice identified the wells as being located in the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 33, Township Instantaneous Rights / Maximum Day Demand Description (gpm)(acre-feet)(gpm) Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 12,375 9,180 5,691 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 19,571 24,574 15,235 Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 13,208 9,798 6,074 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 18,738 23,957 14,852 Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 16,841 12,494 7,745 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 15,105 21,261 13,181 Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 11,899 8,827 5,473 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 20,047 24,927 15,454 Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 12,716 9,433 5,848 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 19,230 24,322 15,078 Potable Water Rights 31,946 33,755 20,926 Projected Water Demand 16,289 12,084 7,491 Surplus (or Deficient) Rights 15,657 21,671 13,435 Year 2066 (+50 years) With Conservation Annual Rights / Average Day Demand Year 2026 (+10 years) Without Conservation Year 2036 (+20 years) Without Conservation Year 2066 (+50 years) Without Conservation Year 2026 (+10 years) With Conservation Year 2036 (+20 years) With Conservation CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 22 North, Range 6 East W.M. There has been one additional well drilled at this site that is not currently referenced in the water right record as an authorized point of withdrawal. This well is referred to as Kent Springs Well #3 (Well ID Tag AEC866) and was completed in April 2001. The following action was taken to get Kent Springs Well #3 authorized as a point of withdrawal under this water right: • Submitted a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form to identify Kent Springs Well #3 (Well ID Tag AEC866) as an additional point of withdrawal under G1-22956C. North Kent Wellfield (208th, 212th, and Garrison Creek) Water rights G1-23614C, G1-24190C, and G1-24404C all went through a water right change application process in 2003 to have the authorized points of withdrawal include wells located at the 208th Street (208th Street Well), 212th Street (212th Street Wells #1 and #2), and Garrison Creek Well sites (Garrison Creek Well #1). The public notice identified the wells as being located in the SE ¼ SW ¼ Section 6 (208th), SE ¼ NW ¼ Section 7 (212th), and NE ¼ SE ¼ Section 7 (Garrison Creek), all in Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M. There have been two additional wells drilled at these sites that are not currently referenced on the water rights as authorized points of withdrawal. These wells include the 212th Street Well #3 (Well ID Tag AFR915) completed in May 2001 and Garrison Creek Well #2 (Well ID Tag AFT320) completed in February 2004. The following actions were taken to get these two wells included as authorized points of withdrawal under these three water rights: • Submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms to identify the 212th Street Well #3 and Garrison Creek Well #2 as additional points of withdrawal under G1-23614C. • Submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms to identify the 212th Street Well #3 and Garrison Creek Well #2 as additional points of withdrawal under G1-24190C. • Submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms to identify the 212th Street Well #3 and Garrison Creek Well #2 as additional points of withdrawal under G1-24404C. East Hill (104th Avenue SE) Currently, there are five wells (3 inactive, 1 active, and 1 unequipped) at the East Hill (104th Avenue SE) site. Four water rights are associated with the site. The site is bisected by an administrative boundary, which complicates things slightly from a water right perspective. The public notice legal description for the wells under three of the water rights (GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, and G1-23285C) is Block 20 R.O. Smith Orchard Tracts of Section 20, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M. The active well and unequipped well are both located within the published well legal description of GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, and G1-23285C. The active well (East Hill Well #1) is only currently authorized under one water right (G1-23285C). The unequipped well is referred to as East Hill Well #2 (Well ID Tag AFT321) completed in June 2004, is not currently associated with any water right. The following actions were taken to get both wells included as authorized points of withdrawal under these four East Hill (104th Avenue SE) water rights: CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-23 • Submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms to identify East Hill Well #1 as a replacement point of withdrawal under GWC 42-D and GWC 44-A. • Submitted Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) forms to identify the East Hill Well #2 (Unique Well ID AFT321) as an additional point of withdrawal under GWC 42-D, GWC 44-A, and G1-23285C. O’Brien Water right GWC 767-A authorizes withdrawal from the original O’Brien Well (O’Brien Well #1). The public notice identified the well as being located in Tract 27 of Shinn’s Cloverdale Addition to Kent, Washington, Section 7, Township 22 North, Range 5 East W.M. There has been one additional well drilled at this site that is not currently referenced on the water right as an authorized point of withdrawal. This well is referred to as O’Brien Well #2 (Well ID Tag AEJ475) and was completed in September 1999. The following action was taken to get O’Brien Well #2 authorized as a point of withdrawal under this water right: • Submitted a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form to identify O’Brien Well #2 (Well ID Tag AEJ475) as an additional point of withdrawal under GWC 767-A. River Bend Golf Course Water right G1-25204C authorizes withdrawal from the original River Bend Golf Course Well. The original River Bend Golf Course Well experienced decreased production and could not be rehabilitated. The public notice identified the well as being located in the NE ¼ SE ¼ Section 22, Township 22 North, Range 4 East W.M. There has been one additional well drilled at this site that is not currently referenced on the water right as an authorized point of withdrawal. This well is referred to as River Bend Golf Course Well #2 (Well ID Tag APP320) and was completed in August 2016. The following action was taken to get the River Bend Golf Course Well #2 authorized as a point of withdrawal under this water right: • Submitted a Showing of Compliance with RCW 90.44.100(3) form to identify River Bend Golf Course Well #2 (Well ID Tag APP320) as an additional point of withdrawal under G1-25204C. LONG-TERM WATER SUPPLY PLANNING Although the City has sufficient water rights to supply the water system through 2066 and beyond, some facility improvements are necessary to fully utilize the City’s existing water rights. The existing sources of supply for the City’s water system are a mixture of City owned and operated spring and ground water sources in both WRIA 8 and WRIA 9 authorized under City-held water rights, combined with receipt of treated water from the City of Tacoma’s regional water supply system. As the City moves forward, its intention is to rehabilitate and upgrade its facilities to allow for full utilization of its City-owned sources up to the water right limits, as opposed to pursuit of new water rights. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-24 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) FEASIBILITY OF OBTAINING NEW WATER RIGHTS When considering supply redundancy, one option to investigate is the ability to obtain new water rights for municipal purposes. The City’s current water sources and municipal boundary fall within both WRIA 8 – Cedar-Sammamish (Clark Springs site) and WRIA 9 – Green-Duwamish (majority of the City). Both WRIAs have administrative rules that establish the requirements that must be met before there can be an issuance of new water rights. The Green River and Cedar Rivers are subject to minimum instream flow rules and/or agreements that effectively preclude all new surface water withdrawals beyond those occurring during high flow winter months. Since the City of Tacoma secured a flow-restricted, seasonal water right on the Green River for its Second Supply/P-5 project in the 1980’s, no further surface water applications have been approved by Ecology due to ongoing concerns relating to flow levels, cumulative impacts, and tribal treaty rights. Moreover, because streams tributary to the Green and Cedar Rivers have been closed by administrative rule to further appropriation, Ecology has not seriously entertained the issuance of new primary rights for these surface waters for several years. Due to the foregoing factors, and the advent of the Endangered Species Act, development of new additive surface water rights is not considered a viable supply alternative. Application for Emergency Source Water Right As a result of the contamination risk posed by the Landsburg Mine Site to its Clark Springs Water Supply System (CSWSS) and Rock Creek, the City intends to undertake the studies and analysis necessary to submit an emergency source water right application to Ecology. The City’s goal in this regard is to secure an emergency supply source in close proximity to the existing CSWSS with the capacity to replace as much of the CSWSS supply as possible. The emergency source application process, which will be undertaken consistent with the permit requirements cited in Ecology Water Resources Program Policy POL-1045, will include a request for a pre-application meeting with Ecology, a request for a preliminary permit approval to undertake appropriate source testing, and consultations with the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe. FEASIBILITY OF TRANSFERRING EXISTING WATER RIGHTS Changing attributes of existing City-owned water rights is dependent on passing the statutory tests outlined in Chapters 90.03 and 90.44 RCW and as clarified in case law. North Kent Wellfield Expansion to Include O’Brien Site Water right changes include a variety of options, including changes in place of use, purpose of use, and to the point of diversion or withdrawal of water, as well as the addition of points of diversion or withdrawals to allow groundwater production in a wellfield configuration. As noted earlier, the City has secured approval to operate its 208th Street, 212th Street, and Garrison Creek Wells in a wellfield configuration under its water rights to restore the production capacity affected by the Nisqually Earthquake. Due to the close physical proximity and hydrogeologic relationship of this wellfield to the O’Brien site (Cert. No. 767-A), the City intends to submit water right change applications to include the O’Brien site Well #2 as an additional point of withdrawal to the existing North Kent Wellfield water rights (G1-23614C, G1-24190C, and G1-24404C) and to include the North Kent Wellfield wells as additional points of withdrawal under GWC 767-A. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-25 DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS OVERVIEW The quality of drinking water in the United States is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Under provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the EPA is allowed to delegate primary enforcement responsibility for water quality control to each state. In the State of Washington, DOH is the agency responsible for implementing and enforcing the drinking water regulations. For the State of Washington to maintain primacy (delegated authority to implement requirements) under the SDWA, the state must adopt drinking water regulations that are at least as stringent as the federal regulations. In meeting these requirements, the State, in cooperation with the EPA, has published drinking water regulations that are contained in Chapter 246-290 WAC. EXISTING REGULATIONS The Federal SDWA was enacted in 1974, as a result of public concern about water quality. The SDWA sets standards for the quality of drinking water and requires water treatment, if these standards are not met. The SDWA also sets water testing schedules and methods that water systems must follow. In 1986, the SDWA was amended as a result of additional public concern and frequent contamination of groundwater from industrial solvents and pesticides. The 1986 Amendments require water systems to monitor and treat for a continuously increasing number of water contaminants identified in the new federal regulations. The EPA regulated approximately 20 contaminants between 1974 and 1986. The 1986 Amendments identified 83 contaminants that EPA was required to regulate by 1989. Implementation of the new regulations has been marginally successful due to the complexity of the regulations and the associated high costs. To rectify the slow implementation of the new regulations, the SDWA was amended again and re-authorized in August of 1996. In response to the 1986 SDWA Amendments, EPA established six rules, known as the Phase I Rule, Phase II and IIb Rules, Phase V Rule, Surface Water Treatment Rule, Total Coliform Rule, and Lead and Copper Rule. The EPA regulates most chemical contaminants through the Phase I, II, IIb, and V Rules. The City’s active sources are affected by many of these rules. The EPA set two limits for each contaminant that is regulated under the rules. The first limit is a health goal, referred to as the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG). The MCLG is zero for many contaminants, especially known cancer-causing agents (carcinogens). The second limit is a legal limit, referred to as the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). The MCLs are equal to or higher than the MCLGs; however, most MCLs and MCLGs are the same, except for contaminants that are regulated as carcinogens. The health goals (MCLGs) for carcinogens are typically zero, because they cause cancer and it is assumed that any amount of exposure may pose some risk of cancer. A summary of each rule follows. To fully understand the discussion that follows, a brief definition of several key terms is provided below. • Organic Chemicals – Animal or plant produced substances containing carbon and other elements such as hydrogen and oxygen. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-26 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) • Synthetic Organic Chemicals (SOCs) – Man-made organic substances, including herbicides, pesticides, and various industrial chemicals and solvents. • Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs) – Chemicals, as liquids, that evaporate easily into the air. • Inorganic Chemicals (IOCs) – Chemicals of mineral origin that are naturally occurring elements. These include metals such as lead and cadmium. Phase I Rule The Phase I Rule, which was the EPA’s first response to the 1986 Amendments, provided limits for eight VOCs that may be present in drinking water. VOCs are used by industries in the manufacturing of rubber, pesticides, deodorants, solvents, plastics, and other chemicals. VOCs are found in everyday items such as gasoline, paints, thinners, lighter fluid, mothballs, and glue, and are typically encountered at dry cleaners, automotive service stations, and elsewhere in industrial processes. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule. Phase II and IIb Rules The Phase II and IIb Rules updates and creates limits for 38 contaminants (organics and inorganics). Some of the contaminants are frequently applied agricultural chemicals (nitrate), while others are more obscure industrial chemicals. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule. Phase V Rule The Phase V Rule sets standards for 23 additional contaminants, of which 18 are organic chemicals (mostly pesticides and herbicides) and 5 are IOCs (such as cyanide). The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule. Surface Water Treatment Rule Surface water sources, such as rivers, lakes, and reservoirs (which are open to the atmosphere and subject to surface runoff), and GWI sources are governed by the Surface Water Treatment Rule. The SWTR seeks to prevent waterborne diseases caused by the microbes Cryptosporidium, Legionella, and Giardia lamblia, which are present in most surface waters. The rule requires disinfection of all surface water and GWI sources. All surface water and GWI sources must also be filtered, unless a filtration waiver is granted. A filtration waiver may be granted to systems with pristine sources that continuously meet stringent source water quality and protection requirements. The City’s water supply is classified as groundwater at all sources except for the Tacoma Regional Water Supply. Tacoma Public Utilities is responsible for monitoring and satisfying the water quality requirements for the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline Source. Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule The Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (IESWTR) became effective concurrent with the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rule. The rule primarily applies to public water systems that serve 10,000 or more people and use surface water or GWI sources. The rule also requires primacy agencies (i.e., DOH in Washington State) to conduct sanitary surveys of all CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-27 surface water and GWI systems, regardless of size. The rule is the first to directly regulate the protozoan Cryptosporidium and has set the MCLG for Cryptosporidium at zero. The City’s water supply is classified as groundwater at all sources except for the Tacoma Regional Water Supply. Tacoma Public Utilities is responsible for monitoring and satisfying the water quality requirements for the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline Source. Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule The Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT1ESWTR) addresses water systems using surface water or GWI sources serving fewer than 10,000 people. The rule extends protections against Cryptosporidium for smaller water systems. The City’s water supply is classified as groundwater at all sources except for the Tacoma Regional Water Supply. Tacoma Public Utilities is responsible for monitoring and satisfying the water quality requirements for the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline Source. Revised Total Coliform Rule The Revised Total Coliform Rule sets an MCL for Escherichia Coli (E. coli) and specifies the frequency and timing of coliform testing based on population served, public water system type, and source water type. When total coliform is detected, it is a treatment technique trigger. The water system must conduct an assessment of their water system facilities and operations and fix any sanitary defects. For confirmed E. coli incidents, known as an E. coli MCL violation, the water system must perform a Level 2 assessment and provide public notice within 24 hours. If a positive sample is collected on a consecutive system, the City will also need to collect source samples. Coliform is a group of bacteria, some of which live in the digestive tract of humans and many animals, and are excreted in large numbers with feces. Coliform can be found in sewage, soils, surface waters, and vegetation. The presence of any coliform in drinking water indicates a potential health risk and potential waterborne disease outbreak, which may include gastroenteric infections, dysentery, hepatitis, typhoid fever, cholera, and other infectious diseases. E. coli is a member of the coliform group which is almost exclusively of fecal origin, and their presence can lead to increased health risks. A copy of the City’s Water Quality Monitoring Plan, including the coliform monitoring program and E. coli response plan, is contained in Appendix I. Lead and Copper Rule The Lead and Copper Rule identifies action levels for both lead and copper. An action level is different than an MCL. An MCL is a legal limit for a contaminant, and an action level is a trigger for additional prevention or removal steps. The action level for lead is greater than 0.015 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The action level for copper is greater than 1.3 mg/L. If the 90th percentile concentration of either lead or copper from the group of samples exceeds these action levels, a corrosion control study must be undertaken to evaluate strategies and make recommendations for reducing the lead or copper concentration below the action levels. The rule requires systems that exceed the lead level to educate the affected public about reducing its lead intake. Systems that continue to exceed the lead action level after implementing corrosion control and source water treatment may be required to replace piping in the system that contains lead sources. Corrosion control is typically accomplished by increasing the pH of the water to CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-28 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) make it less corrosive, which reduces its ability to break down water pipes and absorb lead or copper. Lead is a common metal found throughout the environment in lead-based paint, air, soil, household dust, food, certain types of pottery, porcelain, pewter, brass, and water. Lead can pose a significant health risk if too much of it enters the body. Lead builds up in the body over many years and can cause damage to the brain, red blood cells, and kidneys. The greatest risk is to young children and pregnant women. Lead can slow normal mental and physical development of growing bodies. Copper is a common, natural, and useful metal found in our environment. It is also a trace element needed in most human diets. The primary impact of elevated copper levels in water systems is stained plumbing fixtures. At certain levels (well above the action levels), copper may cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It can also lead to serious health problems in people with Wilson’s disease. Long-term exposure to elevated levels of copper in drinking water could also increase the risk of liver and kidney damage. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring and treatment requirements under this rule. Radionuclides Rule The EPA established interim drinking water regulations for radionuclides in 1976 under the SDWA. MCLs were established for alpha, beta, and photon emitters, and radium 226/228. Radionuclides are elements that undergo a process of natural decay and emit radiation in the form of alpha or beta particles and gamma photons. The radiation can cause various kinds of cancers, depending on the type of radionuclide exposure from drinking water. The regulations address both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water. The 1986 Amendments to the SDWA finalized the regulations for radionuclides by eliminating the term "interim." The amendments also directed the EPA to promulgate health-based MCLGs, as well as MCLs. The EPA failed to meet the statutory schedules for promulgating the radionuclide regulations, which resulted in a lawsuit. In 1991, the EPA proposed revisions to the regulations, but a final regulation based on the proposal was never promulgated. The 1996 Amendments to the SDWA directed the EPA to revise a portion of the earlier proposed revisions, adopt a schedule, and review and revise the regulations every 6 years, as appropriate, to maintain or improve public health protection. Subsequent to the 1996 Amendments, a 1996 court order required the EPA to either finalize the 1991 proposal for radionuclides or to ratify the existing standards by November 2000. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on December 7, 2000, and became effective on December 8, 2003. The rule established an MCLG of zero for the four regulated contaminates and MCLs of 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for combined radium-226 and radium-228, 15 pCi/L for gross alpha (excluding radon and uranium), 4 millirems per year (mrem/year) for beta particle and photon radioactivity, and 30 micrograms per liter (µg/L) for uranium. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule. Wellhead Protection Program Section 1428 of the 1986 SDWA Amendments mandates that each state develops a wellhead protection program. The Washington State mandate for wellhead protection, and the required elements of a wellhead protection program, is contained in WAC 246-290-135, Source CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-29 Protection, which became effective in July of 1994. In Washington State, DOH is the lead agency for the development and administration of the State’s wellhead protection program. A wellhead protection program is a proactive and ongoing effort of a water purveyor to protect the health of its customers by preventing contamination of the groundwater that it supplies for drinking water. All federally defined Group A public water systems that use groundwater as their source are required to develop and implement a wellhead protection program. All required elements of a local wellhead protection program must be documented and included in either the Water System Plan (applicable to the City) or a Small Water System Management Program document (not applicable to the City). A copy of the City’s Wellhead Protection Program is contained in Appendix J. Consumer Confidence Report The CCR is the centerpiece of the right-to-know provisions of the 1996 Amendments to the SDWA. The annual report must be updated and re-issued to all customers by July 1st of each year thereafter. The CCR is a report on the quality of water that was delivered to the water users during the previous calendar year. The reports must contain certain specific elements, but may also contain other information that the purveyor deems appropriate for public education. Some, but not all, of the information that is required in the reports includes the source and type of the drinking water, type of treatment, contaminants that have been detected in the water, potential health effects of the contaminants, identification of the likely source of contamination, violations of monitoring and reporting, and variances or exemptions to the drinking water regulations. A copy of the City’s most recent CCR is contained in Appendix K. Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rule Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed when free chlorine reacts with organic substances, most of which occur naturally. These organic substances (called precursors) are a complex and variable mixture of compounds. The DBPs themselves may pose health risks. Trihalomethanes (THM) are a category of DBPs that had been regulated previous to this rule. However, systems with groundwater sources that serve a population of less than 10,000 were not previously required to monitor for THM. The rule applies to the City and most other water systems, including systems serving fewer than 10,000 people that add a chemical disinfectant to the drinking water during any part of the treatment process. The rule reduced the MCL for total THM, which are a composite measure of four individual THM, from the previous interim level of 0.10 mg/L to 0.08 mg/L. The rule established MCLs and requires monitoring of three additional categories of DBPs (0.06 mg/L for five haloacetic acids (HAA5), 0.01 mg/L for bromate, and 1.0 mg/L for chlorite). The rule established maximum residual disinfectant levels for chlorine (4.0 mg/L), chloramines (4.0 mg/L), and chlorine dioxide (0.8 mg/L). The rule also requires systems using surface water or groundwater directly influenced by surface water to implement enhanced coagulation or softening to remove DBP precursors, unless alternative criteria are met. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-30 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Regulation The EPA established the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Regulation (UCMR) to generate data on contaminants that are being considered for inclusion in new drinking water standards. The information collected by select public water systems will ensure that future regulations established by the EPA are based on sound science. Three separate lists of unregulated contaminants are maintained under the UCMR: List 1, List 2, and List 3. Contaminants are organized on the tiered lists based on the availability of standard testing procedures and the known occurrence of each contaminant, with List 1 containing contaminants that have established standard testing procedures and some, but insufficient, information on their occurrence in drinking water. Monitoring for contaminants on the three lists is limited to a maximum of 30 contaminants within a 5-year monitoring cycle, and the EPA is required to publish new contaminant monitoring lists every 5 years. As new lists are published, contaminants will be moved up in the lists if adequate information is found to support additional monitoring. All public water systems serving more than 10,000 people and a randomly selected group of smaller water systems are required to monitor for contaminants. The City currently monitors for some unregulated contaminants. Arsenic Arsenic is highly toxic, affects the skin and nervous system, and may cause cancer. The Arsenic Rule sets the MCLG of arsenic at zero and reduces the MCL from the previous standard of 0.05 mg/L to 0.01 mg/L. Arsenic’s monitoring requirements will be consistent with the existing requirements for other inorganic contaminants. The City complies with this rule since its surface and groundwater sources have naturally low levels of arsenic that are below the MCL. Filter Backwash Recycling Rule Public water systems using surface water or groundwater under the direct influence of surface water that utilize filtration processes and recycling must comply with the Filter Backwash Recycling Rule. The rule aims to reduce risks associated with recycling contaminants removed during filtration. The rule requires filter backwash water be returned to a location that allows complete treatment. In addition, filtration systems must provide detailed information regarding the treatment and recycling process to the state. The City’s water supply is classified as groundwater at all sources except for the Tacoma Regional Water Supply. Tacoma Public Utilities is responsible for monitoring and satisfying the water quality requirements for the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline Source. Stage 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rule The EPA implemented the Stage 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Rule simultaneously with the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. Similar to the Stage 1 D/DBPR, this rule applies to most water systems that add a disinfectant to the drinking water other than ultraviolet light or those systems that deliver such water. The Stage 2 D/DBPR changes the calculation procedure requirement of the MCLs for two groups of disinfection byproducts, total THM (TTHM) and HAA5. The rule requires each sampling location to determine compliance with MCLs based on their individual annual average DBP CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-31 levels (termed the Locational Running Annual Average), rather than utilizing a system-wide annual average. The rule also proposes new MCLGs for chloroform (0.07 mg/L), trichloroacetic acid (0.02 mg/L), and monochloroacetic acid (0.03 mg/L). Additionally, the rule requires systems to document peak DBP levels and prepare an Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE) to identify Stage 2 D/DBPR compliance monitoring sites. IDSEs require each water system to prepare a separate IDSE plan and report, with the exception of those systems who obtain a 40/30 Certification or a Very Small System Waiver. In order to qualify for the 40/30 Certification, all samples collected during Stage 1 monitoring must have TTHM and HAA5 levels less than or equal to 0.040 mg/L and 0.030 mg/L, respectively. The City currently complies with all contaminant monitoring requirements under this rule and has qualified for 40/30 Certification and does not require IDSE plan. Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Following the publishing of the IESWTR, the EPA introduced the LT1ESWTR to supplement the preceding regulations. The second part of the regulations of the LT1ESWTR are mandated in the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR). The final rule was implemented simultaneously with the Stage 2 D/DBPR described in the previous section. This rule applies to all systems that use surface water or GWI sources. This rule establishes treatment technique requirements for filtered systems based on their risk level for contamination, calculated from the system’s average Cryptosporidium concentration. Requirements include up to 2.5-log Cryptosporidium treatment, in addition to existing requirements under the IESWTR and LT1ESWTR. Filtered systems that demonstrate low levels of risk will not be required to provide additional treatment. Unfiltered systems under this rule must achieve at least a 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium if the mean level in the source water remains below 0.01 oocysts/L. If an unfiltered system’s mean level of Cryptosporidium exceeds 0.01 oocysts/L, the LT2ESWTR requires the system to provide a minimum 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium. All unfiltered systems are also required to utilize a minimum of two disinfectants in their treatment process. The LT2ESWTR also addresses systems with unfinished water storage facilities. Under this rule, systems must either cover their storage facilities or achieve inactivation and/or removal of 4-log virus, 3-log Giardia lamblia, and 2-log Cryptosporidium on a state-approved schedule. Lastly, the rule extends the requirement of the disinfection profiles mandated under the LT1ESWTR to the proposed Stage 2 D/DBPR. The City’s water supply is classified as groundwater at all sources except for the Tacoma Regional Water Supply. Tacoma Public Utilities is responsible for monitoring and satisfying the water quality requirements for the Tacoma Second Supply Pipeline Source. Groundwater Rule The EPA promulgated the Groundwater Rule (GWR) to reduce the risk of exposure to fecal contamination that may be present in public water systems that use groundwater sources. The GWR also specifies when corrective action (which may include disinfection) is required to protect consumers who receive water from groundwater systems from bacteria and viruses. The GWR applies to public water systems that use groundwater and to any system that mixes surface CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-32 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) and ground waters if the groundwater is added directly to the distribution system and provided to consumers without treatment equivalent to surface water treatment. The rule targets risks through an approach that relies on the four following major components. 1. Periodic sanitary surveys of groundwater systems that require the evaluation of eight critical elements and the identification of significant deficiencies (such as a well located near a leaking septic system). DOH conducted its most recent sanitary survey of the City’s water system on December 8, 2016, under the state’s existing sanitary survey program. 2. Source water monitoring to test for the presence of E. coli, enterococci, or coliphage in the sample. There are two monitoring provisions. o Triggered monitoring for systems that do not already provide treatment that achieves at least 99.99-percent (4-log) inactivation or removal of viruses and that have a total coliform positive routine sample under the Revised Total Coliform Rule sampling in the distribution system. o Assessment monitoring is a complement to triggered monitoring. A state has the option to require systems to conduct source water assessment monitoring at any time to help identify high risk systems. 3. Corrective actions required for any system with a significant deficiency or source water fecal contamination. The system must implement one or more of the following corrective action options: correct all significant deficiencies; eliminate the source of contamination; provide an alternate source of water; or provide treatment that reliably achieves 99.99-percent inactivation or removal of viruses. 4. Compliance monitoring to ensure that treatment technology installed to treat drinking water reliably achieves at least 99.99-percent inactivation or removal of viruses. The City’s last sanitary survey was completed in December 2016. The City is currently addressing minor deficiencies identified in this sanitary survey and complies with all other requirements of the rule. FUTURE REGULATIONS Drinking water regulations are continuously changing in an effort to provide higher quality and safer drinking water. Modifications to the existing rules described above and implementation of new rules are planned for the near future. A summary of upcoming drinking water regulations that will most likely affect the City is presented in the following sections. Radon In July of 1991, the EPA proposed a regulation for radon, as well as three other radionuclides. The 1996 SDWA Amendments required the EPA to withdraw the 1991 proposal due to several concerns that were raised during the comment period. A new proposed regulation was published in the Federal Register on November 2, 1999. Comments on the proposed rule were due to the EPA by February 4, 2000. Final federal requirements for addressing radon were delayed until 2008 but have not yet been published. The rule proposes a 300 pCi/L MCL for community water systems that use groundwater or an alternative, less stringent MCL of 4,000 pCi/L for water systems where their state implements an EPA-approved program to reduce radon risks in CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-33 household indoor air and tap water. It is not currently known when or what a radon regulation may require as adopted by the EPA or what the implementation schedule for the rule will be. Because the final radon rule requirements are uncertain, the impact of this rule on the City is unknown at this time. Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Regulation Revisions In accordance with the original UCMR and the SDWA, once every 5 years the EPA will issue a new list of no more than 30 unregulated contaminants to be monitored by public water systems. The fourth UCMR was proposed on December 11, 2015, and includes a list of 30 chemicals that will be monitored during the 2017 through 2021 monitoring cycle, and approves several new testing methods to conduct the monitoring. For this upcoming cycle, all systems serving more than 10,000 people and a larger representative sample of smaller water systems will be required to monitor for contaminants. The rule also requires additional water system data to be reported with the monitoring results, establishes a procedure for determining minimum reporting levels, and proposes several revisions to the implementation of the monitoring program. SOURCE WATER QUALITY This section presents the current water quality standards for groundwater sources and the results of the City’s recent source water quality monitoring efforts. A discussion of the water quality requirements and monitoring results for the City’s distribution system is presented in the section that follows. DRINKING WATER STANDARDS Drinking water quality is regulated at the federal level by the EPA and at the State level by DOH. Drinking water standards have been established to maintain high-quality drinking water by limiting the levels of specific contaminants (i.e., regulated contaminants) that can adversely affect public health and are known or likely to occur in public water systems. Non-regulated contaminants do not have established water quality standards and are generally monitored at the discretion of the water purveyor and in the interest of customers. The regulated contaminants are grouped into two categories of standards – primary and secondary. Primary standards are drinking water standards for contaminants that could affect health. Water purveyors are required by law to monitor and comply with these standards and notify the public if water quality does not meet any one of the standards. Secondary standards are drinking water standards for contaminants that have aesthetic effects, such as unpleasant taste, odor, or color (staining). The national secondary standards are unenforceable federal guidelines or goals where federal law does not require water systems to comply with them. However, states may adopt their own enforceable regulations governing these contaminants. The State of Washington has adopted regulations that require compliance with some of the secondary standards. Water purveyors are not required to notify the public if their water quality does not meet the secondary standards. SOURCE MONITORING REQUIREMENTS AND WAIVERS The City is required to perform water quality monitoring at each of its active sources for inorganic chemical and physical substances, organic chemicals, and radionuclides. The CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-34 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) monitoring requirements that the City must comply with are specified in WAC 246-290-300. A description of the source water quality monitoring requirements and procedures for each group of substances is contained in the City’s Water Quality Monitoring Plan, which is included as Appendix I. DOH has developed the Susceptibility Assessment Survey Form for water purveyors to complete for use in determining a drinking water source’s potential for contamination. The results of the susceptibility assessment may provide monitoring waivers that allow reduced source water quality monitoring. Based on the results of the susceptibility assessment survey for each source, DOH assigned high susceptibility ratings to Clark Springs and the North Kent Wellfield, a moderate susceptibility rating to Kent Springs and Armstrong Wells #1 and #2, and a low susceptibility rating to East Hill Well #1, Seven Oaks Well, Obrien Well, and Garrison Creek Well #2. SOURCE MONITORING RESULTS The City’s sources maintain a high level of water quality and have met or exceeded all drinking water standards within the last 6 years, with the exception of 4 discrete detections of coliform in November 2016, September 2016, October 2014, and June 2012. Repeat coliform samples were not positive; therefore, these samples can be disregarded as outliers. Kent Springs and Clark Springs were last monitored for IOCs and VOCs in July of 2016. These sources have waivers for IOCs, VOCS, pesticides, soil fumigants, and radionuclides which are valid through December of 2019, and a waiver for herbicides valid through December of 2022. Both spring sources are also sampled annually for nitrates. Similar to the City’s spring sources, the East Hill Well #1, Seven Oaks Well, N Kent Wellfield, O’Brien Well, Garrison Well #1, and Armstrong Wells #1 and #2 sources are tested annually for nitrates, have waivers for IOCs, VOCs, pesticides, soil fumigants, and radionuclides valid through December of 2019, and a waiver for herbicides through December 2022. Additionally, the Seven Oaks Well, N Kent Wellfield, O’Brien Well, and Garrison Creek Well #2 are required to sample for manganese once every 3 years, with the next round of samples being due during the summer of 2019. The results of inorganic chemical (including nitrate) and VOC monitoring for the City’s sources indicate that all primary and secondary standards were met. Due to the close proximity of the Clark Springs site to the Landsburg Mine site, the City has advised Ecology of the City’s concerns about a contamination event originating from the site that results in the temporary or permanent loss of the City’s Clark Springs source. In recent years, the City has submitted to Ecology comments in opposition to Ecology’s cleanup action plan for the site, seeking further investigative/action at the site and seeking a cleanup action plan more protective of area groundwater including the Clark Springs source aquifers. The City has implemented various activities to increase monitoring and sampling at and near Clark Springs. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION/RELIABILITY STUDIES The geology and hydrogeology of southwestern King County, encompassing the City’s area, has been summarized in a series of reports, including Luzier (1969) and Woodward, et al. (1995), the South King County Ground Water Management Plan (1989), and local area Wellhead Protection Plans (Covington Water District, 1995; Lake Meridian Water District, 1996; and the City of CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-35 Kent, 1996). In November 1997, the City authorized Hart Crowser to conduct a Phase 1 wellfield evaluation of its Clark Springs and Kent Springs groundwater systems. This study, which was completed in June 1998, included evaluating the maximum well field yield using the MODFLOW groundwater flow model developed for the Kent Wellhead Protection Study. In September of 2006, the City retained Robinson, Noble & Saltbush to conduct a reliability study of its in-town water sources, with a project goal of determining the 98-percent reliable firm yield for these sources. The end result of the study should provide the City with the firm yield for each of these wells and well sites, such that the City knows how much water is available to be developed through existing wells and potential future wells at each of its existing well sites. In January 2008, the City retained Aspect Consulting to undertake a Phase 2 comprehensive wellhead protection study addressing all wells and source aquifers not addressed in the 2008 Phase 1 wellhead protection study. The first task of this study, which was completed in May 2008, involved compiling the delineated wellhead protection areas (WHPA) for each of the City’s nine groundwater supply sources. Additional tasks included: • Preparing an inventory of potential sources of groundwater contamination for the each of the nine groundwater supply sources; • Ranking each of the contaminant sources identified within each WHPA with respect to its potential risk for contamination of the City’s well source; • Refining the management strategies identified in the existing WHPP, and development of new management strategies as appropriate; and • Updating the existing Monitoring Plan, Contingency Plan, and Spill Response Plan to address all groundwater supply sources. Although there are no new potential sources of contamination outlined in the Aspect Consulting study, there are many new confirmed and suspected sites that were not listed in the Hart Crowser study (1996). All of these locations were notified in 2009, and again in 2018, about the wellhead protection area. As a general operational matter, the City monitors groundwater levels in its well sources to monitor the sources, and as required by Ecology and related water right authorizations. DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER QUALITY MONITORING REQUIREMENTS AND RESULTS The City is required to perform water quality monitoring within the distribution system for coliform bacteria, disinfectant (chlorine) residual concentration, DBPs, lead and copper, and asbestos in accordance with Chapter 246-290 WAC. A description of the distribution system water quality monitoring requirements and procedures are contained in the City’s Water Quality Monitoring Plan that is included in Appendix I. The City has been in compliance with all monitoring requirements for the past several years, except for some coliform violations that are described in the following section. A summary of the results of the distribution system water quality monitoring within the City’s system is also presented. CHAPTER 6 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 6-36 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) Coliform Monitoring From 2012 to 2018, coliform monitoring met regulations since samples did not test positive in more than 5 percent of the routine samples taken each month. Positive samples were found in September and November of 2016, October of 2014, and June of 2012. All follow-up repeat samples were negative. The positive samples were likely due to error. Based on the City’s current population, a minimum of 80 coliform samples per month from different locations throughout the system are required to be collected. A description of coliform monitoring protocol and sample locations is described in the City’s Coliform Monitoring Program, which is included in Appendix I. Disinfectant Residual Concentration Monitoring Disinfection requirements applicable to the City are contained in WAC 246-290-310, which states that a disinfectant residual concentration of 0.2 mg/L shall be detectable in all active parts of the distribution system and that the maximum residual disinfectant level shall be 4.0 mg/L for chlorine and chloramines. Handheld chlorine residuals are recorded each time a coliform sample is collected; therefore, the City collects a minimum of 80 samples each month in addition to its online chlorine analyzers. The City’s chlorination targets are to maintain a 0.5 mg/L residual at the furthest reaches of the distribution system; therefore, water is dosed at the entry point to meet that target. The City typically doses within the range of 0.8 and 1.0 mg/L; however, water coming from Tacoma enters the distribution system with a 1.2 to 1.6 mg/L concentration. In 2018 and January through March 18, 2019, free chlorine readings ranged between 0.30 and 1.93 mg/L and averaged 0.84 mg/L throughout the distribution system. The results of residual disinfectant concentration tests indicate that the City is in compliance with the regulations. Disinfectants/Disinfection Byproducts Monitoring THM and HAA5 are DBPs that are formed when free chlorine reacts with organic substances (i.e., precursors), most of which occur naturally. Formation of THM and HAA5 are dependent on such factors as amount and type of chlorine used, water temperature, concentration of precursors, pH, and chlorine contact time. THM have been found to cause cancer in laboratory animals and are suspected to be human carcinogens. In response to the Stage 1 and Stage 2 D/DBPR, the City expanded its distribution system monitoring to include THM and HAA5. The City is required to collect four THM and four HAA5 samples on a quarterly basis. All recent samples show concentrations below both substances MCLs. Therefore, the City is in compliance with this regulation. A copy of the City’s Stage 2 D/DBP Monitoring Plan is provided in Appendix I. The City was granted 40/30 Certification based on historical water quality data, and was therefore not required to perform an IDSE. Lead and Copper Monitoring The Lead and Copper Rule identifies the action level for lead as being greater than 0.015 mg/L, and the action level for copper as being greater than 1.3 mg/L. The City is required to collect 30 samples every 3 years. The latest tests occurred in September of 2018, which yielded a range of 0.001 to 0.0012 mg/L for lead and a range of 0.02 to 0.29 mg/L for copper. These results have all been satisfactory, since the 90th percentile concentration of either lead or copper from each group of samples has not exceeded the action levels. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SOURCE AND QUALITY Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH6.DOCX (9/30/2019 12:54 PM) 6-37 Asbestos Asbestos monitoring is required if the sources are vulnerable to asbestos contamination or if the distribution system contains more than 10 percent of asbestos cement (AC) pipe. The City has a 9-year waiver with DOH for asbestos monitoring that will expire in December 2019. The last time an asbestos sample was taken was in December 1998. This sample yielded a concentration of 0.196 million fibers per liter, whereas the current MCL for asbestos is 7 million fibers per liter and greater than 10 microns in length. Should the City ever recommence asbestos monitoring, it must be accomplished during the first 3-year compliance period of each 9-year compliance cycle. The water sample must be taken at a tap that is served by an asbestos cement pipe under conditions where asbestos contamination is most likely to occur. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-1 7 | WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION This chapter presents the analysis of the City of Kent’s (City) existing water system. Individual water system components were analyzed to determine their ability to meet policies and design criteria under existing and future water demand conditions. The policies and design criteria are presented in Chapter 5, and the water demands are presented in Chapter 4. A description of the water system facilities and current operation is presented in Chapter 2. The last section of this chapter presents the existing system capacity analysis that was performed to determine the maximum number of equivalent residential units (ERUs) that can be served by the City’s existing water system. PRESSURE ZONES The ideal static pressure of water supplied to customers is between 40 and 80 pounds per square inch (psi). Pressures within a water distribution system are commonly as high as 120 psi, requiring pressure reducing valves (PRVs) on individual service lines to reduce the pressure to 80 psi or less. It is difficult for the City’s water system (and most others) to maintain distribution pressures between 40 and 80 psi, primarily due to the topography of the water service area. Table 7-1 lists each of the City’s 11 pressure zones (the north and south sections of the 240 Zone and 360 Zone are evaluated separately), the highest and lowest elevation served in each zone, and the minimum and maximum distribution system pressures within each zone based on maximum static water conditions (full reservoirs with no demand). While this table presents the results of the pressure evaluations based on the adequacy of the pressure zones under static conditions, the hydraulic analysis section later in this chapter presents the results of the pressure evaluations based on the adequacy of the water mains under dynamic conditions. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-1 Minimum and Maximum Distribution System Static Pressures Elevation (feet) Static Pressure (psi) Elevation (feet) Static Pressure (psi) 240 Zone 135 46 20 95 271 Alvord Zone 183 38 79 83 308 Hilltop Zone1 133 86 119 92 339 Seattle Zone 268 31 74 115 354.5 Zone 272 36 94 113 366 Stetson Zone 234 57 174 83 368 Weiland Zone 219 65 106 114 416 Zone2 312 45 83 144 485 Zone 397 38 154 143 529 Zone 434 41 277 109 575 Zone 445 56 408 73 587 Zone 454 58 327 112 590 Zone 504 37 286 132 240 Zone 135 46 20 95 271 Alvord Zone 183 38 79 83 308 Hilltop Zone1 133 86 119 92 339 Seattle Zone 268 31 74 115 354.5 Zone 272 36 94 113 366 Stetson Zone 234 57 174 83 368 Weiland Zone 219 65 106 114 416 Zone2 312 45 83 144 485 Zone 397 38 154 143 529 Zone 434 41 277 109 575 Zone 587 Zone 454 58 327 112 590 Zone 471 51 286 132 640 Zone 504 59 383 111 (2) No direct service connections exist in the 416 Zone, but the zone was included to identify pressures within the 416 Zone infrastructure. Lowest Elevation ServedHighest Elevation Served Pressure Zone Existing System (1) Hydraulic grade line of the 308 Hilltop Zone measured as 332 feet in November 2017. Projected 20-year System with Improvements Converted to 587 Zone The City is currently providing water at pressures of at least 40 psi to services in each zone except for the 271 Alvord, 339 Seattle, 354.5, 485, and 590 Zones, as shown in Table 7-1. The low pressures in the 339 Seattle Zone occur in the Carter Place cul-de-sac, just east of Van De Vanter Avenue. The low pressures in the 354.5 Zone occur near the intersection of Reith Road and S 253rd Street, and near the intersection of S 254th Street and 45th Avenue S. The low pressures in the 590 Zone occur within and adjacent to SE 248th Street, including portions of CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-3 121st Place SE and 120th Avenue SE near their intersections with SE 248th Street. The low pressure areas in the 590 Zone will be converted to the 640 Zone in the future, as described in Chapter 9. Pressures over 120 psi occur in the 416, 485, and 590 Zones. The 416 Zone does not have any direct service connections, but the high pressures in the zone occur near the intersection of 93rd Avenue S and S 218th Street in the 16-inch-diameter transmission main between the 6 Million Gallon (MG) #1 Reservoir and the 6 MG #2 Reservoir. The high pressures in the 590 Zone occur within 100th Avenue SE, between SE 227th Street and SE 225th Place. The proposed 20-year planning period static pressures are shown in the bottom section of Table 7-1. These static pressures assume that the pressure zone improvement projects described in Chapter 9 are completed, and that services located on or near the boundary of two pressure zones are connected to the pressure zone that provides more suitable pressures. SOURCE CAPACITY EVALUATION This section evaluates the combined capability of the City’s existing sources to determine if they have sufficient capacity to meet the overall demands of the water service area based on existing and future water demands. The section that follows will address the evaluation of the individual facilities to determine if they have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future demands of the individual zone, or zones, that they supply. ANALYSIS CRITERIA Supply facilities must be capable of adequately and reliably supplying high-quality water to the system. In addition, supply facilities must provide a sufficient quantity of water at pressures that meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-230. The evaluation of the combined capacity of the sources in this section is based on the criteria that they provide supply to the system at a rate that is equal to or greater than the maximum day demand (MDD) of the system. SOURCE CAPACITY ANALYSIS RESULTS The combined capability of the City’s active sources to meet both existing and future demand requirements, based on existing pumping capacities of the individual supply facilities, is presented in Table 7-2. The demands used in the evaluation for 2028 and 2038 are future demand projections without reductions from water use efficiency efforts, as shown in Table 4-12 of Chapter 4. Therefore, if additional reductions in water use are achieved through water use efficiency efforts, the total source capacity required in the future will be less than that shown in Table 7-2. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-2 Water Source Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Day Demand 11,629 11,867 12,375 13,208 208th Street/ 212th Street Wellfield 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,500 Armstrong Springs Wells 1,050 1,050 1,050 1,050 Clark Springs 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 East Hill Well 1,900 1,900 1,900 1,900 Garrison Creek Well 500 500 500 500 Kent Springs 3,680 3,680 3,680 3,680 O'Brien Well1 0 0 0 0 Seven Oaks Well 350 350 350 350 Regional Water Supply System 8,778 8,778 8,778 8,778 Total Source Capacity 25,158 25,158 25,158 25,158 Surplus or Deficiency 13,529 13,291 12,783 11,950 (1) Currently not utilized for water quality purposes, but is equipped with pumping equipment capable of providing up to 243 gpm to the system. Projected 20182016Description Required Supply (gpm) Surplus or Deficient Source Capacity (gpm) Available Source Capacity (gpm) The results of the analysis indicate that the City has approximately 13,530 gallons per minute (gpm) of surplus source capacity to meet existing (year 2018) demands. Chart 7-1 shows the relationship between future projected supply and demands. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-5 Chart 7-1 Future Water Supply and Demand Projections 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 Equivalent Residential Units (ERUs)MDD and Supply (gpm)Year MDD without WUE MDD with WUE Supply Equivalent Residential Units 2018 (Base Year) 2028 (+10 Years) 2038 (+20 Years) WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES EVALUATION This section evaluates the existing supply facilities to determine if they have sufficient capacity to provide water supply at a rate that meets the existing and future demands of each of the zones that they supply. Figures 2-1 and 2-2 in Chapter 2 display the pressure zones described within this section. This section also identifies deficiencies that are not related to the capacity of the supply facilities. ANALYSIS CRITERIA The evaluation to determine if supply facilities have adequate capacity is based on one of two criteria, as follows: 1) if the pressure zone that the facility provides supply into has water storage, then the amount of supply required is equal to the MDD of the zone; or 2) if the pressure zone that the facility provides supply into does not have water storage, then the amount of supply required is equal to the peak hour demand (PHD) of the zone. The higher supply requirement of the latter criteria is compensating for the lack of equalizing storage that is typically utilized to provide short-term supply during times of peak system demands. The available supply to each pressure zone is based on the maximum pumping capacity of each facility with all pumping units operating, per the requirements of WAC 246-290-230. The CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Washington State Department of Health (DOH) Water System Design Manual recommends that additional capacity or redundancy be considered, and that new pumping facilities be designed to provide the average day demand (ADD) of the zone with the largest pumping unit out of service. Calculations were performed for each pressure zone based on each criterion, with a description of the results provided for each pressure zone in the following sections. SUPPLY ANALYSIS RESULTS Valley Operating Area 240 Zone All the City’s sources are capable of directly or indirectly supplying the 240 Zone, with indirect supply from Clark Springs and the East Hill Well capable of being transferred to the 240 Zone via interties with the Kent Springs Transmission Main that supplies the 240 Zone’s Guiberson Reservoir. Additionally, multiple sources, including the Armstrong Springs Wells, Seven Oaks Well, and the City’s Regional Water Supply System (RWSS) Point of Delivery (POD) #3 supply either the 240 Zone via the Kent Springs Transmission Main or the East Hill operating area. For the purposes of the supply analysis, supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well were assumed to be entirely available to the 240 Zone as they are not needed to meet the East Hill operating area supply requirements during normal operations. The majority of the City’s total RWSS supply has historically been to the 590 Zone, with approximately 67 percent supplied to the 590 Zone in 2016 compared to approximately 33 percent supplied to the 240 Zone in 2016. The 2016 RWSS supply percentages have been assumed to be applicable for the 2018, 2028, and 2038 planning periods. Table 7-3 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 240 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the operating area. Table 7-3 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 240 Zone, assuming supply from Clark Springs and the East Hill Well is exclusively conveyed to other zones and is not available to the 240 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 240 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future demands. In the event that the 240 Zone’s largest source (Kent Springs) is out of service, the remaining facilities have sufficient capacity to meet projected MDD of the 240 Zone beyond the 10-year planning period. If the O’Brien Well is considered available to the system, the City’s supply facilities have sufficient capacity to meet projected MDD of the 240 Zone through the 20-year planning period in the event that Kent Springs is out of service. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-7 Table 7-3 240 Zone Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 240 Zone MDD 6,676 6,813 7,069 7,685 Other Zones MDD1 777 792 831 847 Total Required Supply 7,452 7,605 7,900 8,532 208th Street/ 212th Street Wellfield 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,500 Armstrong Springs Wells2 1,050 1,050 1,050 1,050 Garrison Creek Well 500 500 500 500 Kent Springs 3,680 3,680 3,680 3,680 O'Brien Well3 0 0 0 0 Seven Oaks Well2 350 350 350 350 Regional Water Supply System 4 2,926 2,926 2,926 2,926 Total Supply Capacity 12,006 12,006 12,006 12,006 Surplus or Deficiency 4,554 4,401 4,106 3,474 Available Supply Capacity (gpm) Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) The MDD of the West Hill zones is included in the 240 Zone supply evaluation. Demands in excess of these zone's MDD (i.e., PHD or fire flow) are supplied by the 240 Zone Reservoirs. (4) The City's portion of the available RWSS capacity is 12.64 MGD (8,778 gpm), with water being supplied to the 240 Zone (via the Kent Springs Transmission Main) or the 590 Zone. RWSS supply is provided at two delivery points; POD #1, which conveys supply directly to the 240 Zone; and POD #3, which can supply either the 240 Zone or the 590 Zone. The majority of the City's total RWSS supply historically has been to the 590 Zone. In 2016, approximately 67 percent of the City's RWSS supply was conveyed to the 590 Zone, with approximately 33 percent of the RWSS supply conveyed to the 240 Zone. For the purposes of these analyses, 67 percent of the City's RWSS capacity was assumed to be available in the 590 Zone, with the remaining 33 percent available in the 240 Zone. (3) Currently not utilized for water quality purposes but is equipped with pumping equipment capable of providing up to 243 gpm to the system. (2) Supply from these facilities also can be conveyed to the Clark Springs Transmission Main. West Hill Operating Area All water supply to the West Hill operating area currently is provided by Pump Station #3. It is expected that a future booster pump station (BPS) adjacent to S 228th Street just east of the Green River will be constructed by 2028 and will provide additional redundancy and an additional 1,000 gpm of firm capacity to the West Hill operating area. This alone is more than sufficient CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) capacity to meet the projected 20-year MDD of the West Hill operating area. The future BPS is anticipated to pump 240 Zone water to the 587 Zone, and is expected to be the West Hill operating area’s primary supply in the future. The proposed West Hill operating area supply improvements are described in additional detail in Chapter 9. 354.5 Zone All water supply to the West Hill operating area is currently provided by Pump Station #3, which pumps 240 Zone water directly to the 354.5 Zone. Pump Station #3 is currently required to supply the MDD of the 354.5 Zone, as well as the MDD of the 529, 575, and 587 Zones, which are supplied via subsequent pump stations downstream of the 354.5 Zone. It is anticipated that additional supply will be available to the 354.5 Zone in future planning periods following completion of a future West Hill BPS via pressure reducing valves from other West Hill operating area zones. Table 7-4 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 354.5 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the operating area. Table 7-4 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 354.5 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 354.5 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future demands. In the event that one of the Pump Station #3 pumps is out of service, the remaining pump has sufficient capacity to meet the 2016 and 2018 MDD of the operating area. Following completion of the proposed West Hill BPS, the available supply capacity to the 354.5 Zone will be sufficient to meet the projected 20-year MDD of the operating area in the event that either Pump Station #3 or the proposed West Hill BPS are out of service. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-9 Table 7-4 354.5 Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 354.5 Zone MDD 98 100 117 120 Other Zones MDD1,2 678 692 0 0 Total Required Supply 777 792 117 120 Pump Station #3 - Pump 1 900 900 900 900 Pump Station #3 - Pump 2 900 900 900 900 529 to 354.5 Zone PRVs3 0 0 286 273 Total Supply Capacity 1,800 1,800 2,086 2,073 Surplus or Deficiency 1,023 1,008 1,969 1,953 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) The MDD of the 529, 575, and 587 Zones is included in the 2016 and 2018 supply evaluation for the 354.5 Zone. Demands in excess of these zone's MDD (i.e., PHD or fire flow) are supplied by the Reith Road Standpipe. (2) The proposed West Hill BPS will supply the other West Hill pressure zones in 2028 and 2038; therefore, these zones will not require supply to be conveyed via the 354.5 Zone and Pump Station #3. (3) The 2028 and 2038 supply capacity available via PRVs is the difference between the proposed 1,000 gpm West Hill BPS firm capacity and the MDD of the 529 and 587 Zones. 529 Zone The 529 Zone currently is supplied exclusively by Pump Station #4, which pumps 354.5 Zone water to the 529 Zone. Pump Station #4 currently is required to supply the MDD of the 529 Zone, as well as the MDD of the 575 and 587 Zones, which are supplied via subsequent pump stations that pump out of the 529 Zone. It is anticipated that additional supply will be available to the 529 Zone in future planning periods following completion of a future West Hill BPS via PRVs from the 587 Zone. Table 7-5 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 529 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the operating area. Table 7-5 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 529 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 529 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future demands. However, sufficient fire flow is not available throughout the existing 529 Zone, as presented in the Storage Analysis Results section of this chapter. The proposed West Hill operating area supply improvements described in additional detail in Chapter 9 will resolve the existing zone-wide fire flow supply deficiency in the 529 Zone. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-5 529 Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 529 Zone MDD 320 327 336 342 Other Zones MDD1,2 358 365 117 120 Total Required Supply 678 692 454 462 Pump Station #4 - Pump 1 900 900 900 900 Pump Station #4 - Pump 2 900 900 900 900 Pump Station #4 - Pump 3 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 587 to 529 Zone PRVs3 0 0 622 615 Total Supply Capacity 3,800 3,800 4,422 4,415 Surplus or Deficiency 3,122 3,108 3,969 3,953 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) The MDD of the 575 and 587 Zones is included in the 529 Zone supply evaluation for 2016 and 2018. Demands in excess of the 575 and 587 Zone's MDD (i.e., PHD or fire flow) are supplied by the Cambridge Tank. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (3) The 2028 and 2038 supply capacity available via PRVs is the difference between the proposed 1,000 gpm West Hill BPS firm capacity and the MDD of the 587 Zone. (2) The MDD of the 354.5 Zone is included in the 529 Zone supply evaluation for 2028 and 2038. Following construction of the proposed West Hill BPS, the primary supply to the 354.5 Zone will be from PRVs between the 529 and 354.5 Zones. In the event that any of the Pump Station #4 pumps are out of service, the remaining pumps have sufficient capacity to meet the 2016 and 2018 MDD of the operating area. Following completion of the proposed West Hill BPS, the available supply capacity to the 529 Zone will be sufficient to meet the projected 20-year MDD of the operating area in the event that either Pump Station #4 or the proposed West Hill BPS are out of service. 575 Zone The 575 Zone is a closed pressure zone currently provided normal supply by Pump Station #7, which pumps 529 Zone water to the 575 Zone. During fire or emergency events wherein Pump Station #7 pumps more than 450 gpm for 3 minutes, Pump Station #7 shuts down and the 575 Zone converts to the 529 Zone, with supply conveyed to the 575 Zone customers from the 529 Zone via a check valve in Pump Station #7. Table 7-6 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 575 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the operating area. Table 7-6 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 575 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-11 of the 575 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future PHDs. However, sufficient fire flow is not available throughout the existing 575 Zone, as presented in the Storage Analysis Results section of this chapter. It is anticipated that the 575 Zone will be converted to the 587 Zone in future planning periods and will be supplied directly by a future West Hill Reservoir. The supply evaluation presented in Table 7-6 is based on the 575 Zone remaining a closed zone (and not being converted to the 587 Zone), for conservatism, and in the event that the conversion to the 587 Zone is delayed. The proposed West Hill operating area supply improvements described in additional detail in Chapter 9 will resolve the existing fire flow supply deficiency in the 575 Zone. Table 7-6 575 Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 575 Zone PHD 88 89 94 97 575 Zone Maximum Fire Flow1 ------------ Total Required Supply 88 89 94 97 Pump Station #7 - Pump 12 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #7 - Pump 2 250 250 250 250 Pump Station #7 - Pump 3 250 250 250 250 Largest Pump Out of Service3 (250)(250)(250)(250) Total Supply Capacity 250 250 250 250 Surplus or Deficiency 162 161 156 153 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) Fire flow is currently provided by the 529 Zone; therefore, it is not included in the 575 Zone supply evaluation. Fire flow in future planning periods will be provided by a future West Hill BPS and reservoir in the 587 Zone; therefore, it is not included in the 575 Zone supply evaluation. (3) DOH Water System Design Manual 10.1.2 recommends that at least 30 psi be provided during PHDs in a closed zone with the largest capacity booster pump out of service. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (2) Pump 1 was removed from service in 2009. 587 Zone The 587 Zone currently is a closed pressure zone provided normal supply by Pump Station #6, which pumps 529 Zone water to the 587 Zone. During fire or emergency events wherein Pump Station #6 pumps more than 1,220 gpm for 2 minutes, Pump Station #6 shuts down and the 587 Zone converts to the 529 Zone, with supply conveyed to 587 Zone customers via two check valves from the 529 Zone. It is anticipated that additional supply will be available to the 587 Zone in the 10- and 20-year planning periods following completion of a future West Hill CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) BPS. A future 587 Zone reservoir is also anticipated to be constructed, providing additional redundancy to the 587 Zone and the West Hill operating area. Following completion of a future 587 Zone reservoir, the 587 Zone will not be considered a closed zone, and the 587 Zone supply facilities will be required to supply the MDD of the 587 Zone with all pumps operational, instead of the current requirement of supplying the PHD of the zone with the largest capacity booster pump out of service. It is anticipated that the primary West Hill operating area supply in future planning periods will be the future West Hill BPS; therefore, the MDD of the other West Hill pressure zones is included in the supply requirements for the future planning periods. Table 7-7 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 587 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the operating area. Table 7-7 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 587 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 587 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future domestic demands. However, sufficient fire flow is not available throughout the existing 587 Zone, as presented in the Storage Analysis Results section of this chapter. The proposed West Hill operating area supply improvements described in additional detail in Chapter 9 will resolve the existing fire flow supply deficiency in the 587 Zone. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-13 Table 7-7 587 Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 587 Zone MDD ------378 385 587 Zone PHD 435 444 ------ 587 Zone Maximum Fire Flow1 ------------ Other Zones MDD ------454 462 Total Required Supply 435 444 831 847 Pump Station #6 - Pump 1 200 200 200 200 Pump Station #6 - Pump 2 450 450 450 450 Pump Station #6 - Pump 3 550 550 550 550 Pump Station #8 (HWD Intertie)2 ------------ Largest Pump Out of Service3 (550)(550)0 0 Future West Hill BPS Firm Capacity ------1,000 1,000 Total Supply Capacity 650 650 2,200 2,200 Surplus or Deficiency 215 206 1,369 1,353 Available Supply Capacity (gpm) Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) Fire flow is currently provided by the 529 Zone; therefore, it is not included in the 587 Zone supply evaluation. Fire flow in future planning periods will be provided by a future West Hill reservoir in the 587 Zone, and is not included in the 587 Zone supply evaluation. (2) Pump Station #8 is used in emergency situations to pump water from Highline Water District to the 587 Zone and other West Hill Zones. Pump Station #8 consists of three identical 400 gpm pumps equipped with VFDs, but is not included in the 587 Zone supply evaluation because the facility is used only when Pump Station #6 is out of service. (3) DOH Water System Design Manual 10.1.2 recommends that at least 30 psi be provided during PHDs in a closed zone with the largest capacity booster pump out of service. The largest pump was not assumed to be out of service in future planning periods wherein a future 587 Zone West Hill reservoir is constructed and the 587 Zone is no longer a closed pressure zone. East Hill Operating Area Water supply to the East Hill operating area currently is provided by multiple sources directly to the 416 and 590 Zones, with the supply to the other East Hill pressure zones conveyed by Pump Station #5 and multiple PRVs. The easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone is expected to be converted to a 640 Zone prior to 2028; therefore, a 640 Zone supply analysis is included within this section. The proposed 640 Zone creation improvements are described in additional detail in Chapter 9. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) The Armstrong Springs Wells, Seven Oaks Well, and RWSS POD #3 can supply either the 240 Zone via the Kent Springs Transmission Main or the East Hill operating area. For the purposes of the supply analysis, supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well were assumed to be entirely available to the 240 Zone because RWSS POD #3 and other supply facilities are capable of supplying the East Hill operating area and have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and projected supply requirements of the East Hill operating area without supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well. The majority of the City’s total RWSS supply historically has been to the 590 Zone, with approximately 67 percent supplied to the 590 Zone in 2016 compared to approximately 33 percent supplied to the 240 Zone in 2016. The 2016 RWSS supply percentages have been assumed to be applicable for the 2018, 2028, and 2038 planning periods. 416 Zone The 416 Zone does not have any direct service connections but includes the 6 MG #1 Reservoir which serves as the termination point of the Clark Springs Transmission Main. Water stored in the 6 MG #1 Reservoir may be pumped to the 485 Zone or 590 Zone by Pump Station #5. Water pumped to the 485 Zone is stored in the 125K Tank, is consumed by customers within the 485 Zone, and is conveyed to five zones each supplied by a single PRV station (271 Alvord, 308 Hilltop, 339 Seattle, 366 Stetson, and 368 Weiland Zones). The 416 Zone supply analysis considers the combined MDD of these pressure zones. Supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells, Clark Springs, the Seven Oaks Well, and the 590 Zone (via a normally closed valve at the 114th Street valve station) can be conveyed to the 416 Zone in the Clark Springs Transmission Main. Supply from the 590 Zone can also be conveyed to the 416 Zone through a bypass valve in the Pump Station #5 pump manifold. For the purposes of these analyses, supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells, the Seven Oaks Well, and the 590 Zone were assumed to be entirely available to the 240 Zone because the supply capacity of Clark Springs is sufficient to meet the combined MDD of the pressure zones supplied by the 416 Zone. In the event that the Clark Springs source is out of service or is otherwise unable to supply the 416 Zone, supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well is capable of supplying the 416 Zone. Table 7-8 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 416 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the zone. Table 7-8 also summarizes the current and future amount of water supply available to the 416 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations are of sufficient capacity to meet both existing and future demands. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-15 Table 7-8 416 Zone Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 416 Zone MDD1 0 0 0 0 Other Zones MDD2 467 476 554 630 Total Required Supply 467 476 554 630 Armstrong Springs Wells3 0 0 0 0 Clark Springs 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 Seven Oaks Well3 0 0 0 0 590 Zone Intertie at 114th Street Valve Station 0 0 0 0 Total Supply Capacity 5,400 5,400 5,400 5,400 Surplus or Deficiency 4,933 4,924 4,846 4,770 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) No direct service connections exist within the 416 Zone. Water stored in, and supplied to, the 416 Zone is conveyed to other pressure zones via Pump Station #5 and the transmission main to the Garrison Creek (6 MG #2) Reservoir. (2) The MDD of the 271 Alvord, 308 Hilltop, 339 Seattle, 366 Stetson, 368 Weiland, and 485 Zones are included in the 416 Zone supply evaluation. Demands in excess of these zone's MDD (i.e., PHD or fire flow) are supplied by the 125K Tank in the 485 Zone. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (3) Supply from the Armstrong Springs Wells and the Seven Oaks Well were assumed to be entirely available to the 240 Zone. 485 Zone The 485 Zone is primarily supplied by Pump Station #5, with supplemental supply provided from the 590 Zone via multiple PRV stations. During normal operations, the Pump Station #5 small pumps (Pumps 1 and 2) supply the 485 Zone. Pump 2 is a dual speed pump that is also capable of supplying the 590 Zone. Pump Station #5 is required to supply the MDD of the 485 Zone, as well as the MDD of the 271 Alvord, 308 Hilltop, 339 Seattle, 366 Stetson, and 368 Weiland Zones, which are supplied via subsequent PRV stations. Table 7-9 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 485 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the zone. Table 7-9 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 485 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 485 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future MDDs, with and without the largest pumping unit in service. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-9 485 Zone (Open System) Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 485 Zone MDD 404 412 463 513 Other Zones MDD1 63 64 91 117 Total Required Supply 467 476 554 630 Pump Station #5 - Pump 1 1,225 1,225 1,225 1,225 Pump Station #5 - Pump 2 1,225 1,225 1,225 1,225 Pump Station #5 - Pump 3 2 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 4 2 0 0 0 0 590 to 485 Zone PRVs3 6,750 6,750 6,750 6,750 Total Supply Capacity 9,200 9,200 9,200 9,200 Surplus or Deficiency 8,733 8,724 8,646 8,570 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) The MDD of the 271 Alvord, 308 Hilltop, 339 Seattle, 366 Stetson, and 368 Weiland Zones are included in the 485 Zone supply evaluation. Demands in excess of these zone's MDD (i.e., PHD or fire flow) are supplied by the 125K Tank. (3) Surplus supply available in the 590 Zone presented as available to the 485 Zone, up to the maximum physical capacity of the PRVs, which is calculated to be 5,400 gpm based on the maximum suggested intermittent flow through three 6-inch-diameter Cla-Val 90-01 PRVs. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (2) Pump Station #5 large pumps supply the 590 Zone and are unavailable to provide direct supply to the 485 Zone. As presented in the Storage Analysis Results section of this chapter, the only direct storage facility in the 485 Zone is the 125K Tank, which does not have sufficient capacity to meet the storage needs of the 485 Zone and subsequent zones via PRVs. A closed system supply evaluation for the 485 Zone is shown in Table 7-10, which indicates that sufficient supply from the 590 Zone can be conveyed to the 485 Zone via PRVs in the event that the 125K Tank and the Pump Station #5 small pumps (Pumps 1 and 2) are offline to meet the existing and future demands of the 485 Zone. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-17 Table 7-10 485 Zone (Closed System) Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 485 Zone PHD 590 602 677 749 Other Zones PHD1 92 94 133 171 Maximum Fire Flow Requirement2 3,282 3,282 3,282 3,282 Total Required Supply 3,964 3,978 4,091 4,203 Pump Station #5 - Pump 1 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 2 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 3 3 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 4 3 0 0 0 0 590 to 485 Zone PRVs4 6,750 6,750 6,750 6,750 Total Supply Capacity 6,750 6,750 6,750 6,750 Surplus or Deficiency 2,786 2,772 2,659 2,547 (2) Kent Hillside Church. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) The PHD of the 271 Alvord, 308 Hilltop, 339 Seattle, 366 Stetson, and 368 Weiland Zones are included in the 485 Zone supply evaluation. (3) Pump Station #5 large pumps supply the 590 Zone and are unavailable to provide direct supply to the 485 Zone. (4) Surplus supply available in the 590 Zone presented as available to the 485 Zone, up to the maximum physical capacity of the PRVs, which is calculated to be 5,400 gpm based on the maximum suggested intermittent flow through three 6-inch-diameter Cla-Val 90-01 PRVs. 590 Zone The 590 Zone is supplied by RWSS POD #3, the East Hill Well, and Pump Station #5. During normal operations, the Pump Station #5 small pumps (Pumps 1 and 2) supply the 485 Zone. Pump 2 is a dual speed pump that is also capable of supplying the 590 Zone. For the purposes of the supply analyses presented in this section, the Pump 2 was assumed to be unavailable to the 590 Zone. The Pump Station #5 large pumps (Pumps 3 and 4) supply the 590 Zone during normal operations. The majority of the City’s total RWSS supply has historically been to the 590 Zone, with approximately 67 percent supplied to the 590 Zone in 2016 compared to approximately 33 percent supplied to the 240 Zone in 2016. The 2016 RWSS supply percentages have been assumed to be applicable for the 2018, 2028, and 2038 planning periods. The easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone is expected to be converted to a 640 Zone prior to 2028 that will be CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) supplied by a future 590 to 640 Zone BPS. The 590 Zone supply requirements include the 640 Zone MDD in the future 2028 and 2038 planning periods. Table 7-11 summarizes the current and future supply requirements of the 590 Zone based on existing and projected water demands for the zone. Table 7-11 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 590 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the existing and proposed configurations and capacities of the 590 Zone facilities are sufficient to meet both existing and future MDDs, with and without the largest 590 Zone supply facility in service. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-19 Table 7-11 590 Zone Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 590 Zone MDD 3,710 3,786 2,822 2,912 Other Zones MDD1 0 0 1,098 1,132 Total Required Supply 3,710 3,786 3,920 4,045 Pump Station #5 - Pump 1 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 2 2 0 0 0 0 Pump Station #5 - Pump 3 1,950 1,950 1,950 1,950 Pump Station #5 - Pump 4 1,950 1,950 1,950 1,950 East Hill Well 1,900 1,900 1,900 1,900 King County WD 111 Intertie3 ------------ Soos Creek WSD Intertie4 ------------ RWSS POD #35 5,852 5,852 5,852 5,852 Total Supply Capacity 11,652 11,652 11,652 11,652 Surplus or Deficiency 7,942 7,866 7,732 7,607 (1) The MDD of the 640 Zone is included in the 590 Zone supply evaluation for 2028 and 2038. (2) Pump Station #5 Pump 2 was assumed to be unavailable to the 590 Zone. Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (3) The combined capacity of the three 6-inch meters that comprise the intertie with Water District 111 is 2.0 MGD. The intertie is a two-way intertie and is only used during emergency conditions; therefore it is not included in this supply capacity evaluation. (5) The City's portion of the available RWSS capacity is 12.64 MGD (8,778 gpm), with water being supplied to the 240 Zone (via the Kent Springs Transmission Main) or the 590 Zone. RWSS supply is provided at two connection points; RWSS POD #1, which conveys supply directly to the 240 Zone; and RWSS POD #3, which can supply either the 240 Zone or the 590 Zone. The majority of the City's total RWSS supply has historically been to the 590 Zone. In 2016, approximately 67 percent of the City's RWSS supply was conveyed to the 590 Zone, with approximately 33 percent of the RWSS supply conveyed to the 240 Zone. For the purposes of these analyses, 67 percent of the City's RWSS capacity was assumed to be available in the 590 Zone, with the remaining 33 percent available in the 240 Zone. Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity (gpm) (4) The intertie has a capacity of 1.0 MGD, providing water from SCWSD’s 627 Pressure Zone to the City’s 590 Zone during emergency conditions; therefore it is not included in this supply capacity evaluation. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 640 Zone The 640 Zone is expected to be created prior to the 2028 planning period and consists of the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone. The 640 Zone will be supplied by two future 640 Zone BPSs, and the existing 640 Tank will provide water storage for the zone. One future 640 Zone BPS is planned to be constructed at the Blue Boy Standpipe site, and is anticipated to consist of three 1,750 gpm pumps, resulting in a firm capacity of 3,500 gpm with one pump out of service. The other future 640 Zone BPS is planned to be constructed at the RWSS POD #3 site, and is also anticipated to consist of three 1,750 gpm pumps, resulting in a firm capacity of 3,500 gpm with one pump out of service, and providing the future 640 Zone a redundant supply facility. Table 7-12 summarizes the future supply requirements of the 640 Zone based on projected water demands for the zone. Table 7-12 also summarizes the amount of water supply available to the 640 Zone. The results of the analyses indicate that the proposed configuration and capacity of one of the future 640 Zone BPSs is sufficient to meet future MDDs with the largest pumping unit out of service. Table 7-12 640 Zone Supply Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 640 Zone MDD ------1,098 1,132 Other Zones MDD ------0 0 Total Required Supply ------1,098 1,132 640 Zone BPS (Blue Boy Standpipe Site)------3,500 3,500 640 Zone BPS (RWSS POD #3 Site)------3,500 3,500 Total Supply Capacity ------7,000 7,000 Surplus or Deficiency ------5,902 5,868 Surplus or Deficient Supply Capacity (gpm) (1) Firm capacity for each BPS shown (i.e., largest pumping unit in each BPS out of service). Description Projected 2016 2018 Required Supply (gpm) Available Supply Capacity1 (gpm) CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-21 FACILITY DEFICIENCIES The West Hill operating area lacks redundancy without the use of the Highline Water District Emergency Intertie, as Pump Station #3 is the only facility that supplies the West Hill operating area, and Pump Station #4 is the only facility that can supply the 529, 575, and 587 Zones. If Pump Station #4 was out of service, these zones would need to be supplied by the Highline Water District Emergency Intertie, which is limited in capacity to 1,200 gpm based on the capacity of Pump Station #8. If Pump Station #3 is out of service, the West Hill operating area could be temporarily supplied by the water stored in the Reith Road Standpipe, which has capacity to provide approximately 1.7 days of storage to the West Hill operating area during existing ADD conditions. Improvements to provide redundancy to the West Hill operating area by constructing additional facilities are described in Chapter 9. The O’Brien Well is not normally operated because 480-volt power is not available at the facility and the City has to transport a generator to the site to operate the well pump, sand is present inside the well screen, and high levels of manganese are present in the groundwater. Manganese is a secondary contaminant that can stain fixtures and laundry and may lead to aesthetic customer complaints if not mitigated. Chapter 9 identifies improvements to provide 480-volt power to the site, redevelop the well, and provide a manganese treatment facility. STORAGE FACILITIES This section evaluates the City’s existing water storage tanks to determine if they have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements of the system. This section also identifies facility deficiencies that are not related to the capacity of the water tanks. ANALYSIS CRITERIA Water storage is typically made up of the following components: operational storage; equalizing storage; standby storage; fire flow storage; and dead storage. Each storage component serves a different purpose and will vary from system to system. A definition of each storage component and the criteria used to evaluate the capacity of the City’s storage tanks is provided below. Operational Storage – Volume of the reservoir used to supply the water system under normal conditions when the source or sources of supply are not delivering water to the system (i.e., sources are in the off mode). Operational storage is the average amount of drawdown in the reservoir during normal operating conditions, which represents a volume of storage that most likely will not be available for equalizing storage, fire flow storage, or standby storage. The operational storage is based on the amount of storage between the fill, or pump starting setpoint level, and the overflow elevation of the tank. Equalizing Storage – Volume of the reservoir used to supply the water system under peak demand conditions when the system demand exceeds the total rate of supply of the sources. DOH requires that equalizing storage be stored above an elevation that will provide a minimum CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) pressure of 30 psi at all service connections throughout the system under PHD conditions. Because the City’s supply sources primarily operate on a “call on demand” basis to fill the reservoirs, the equalizing storage requirements are determined with Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual that considers the difference between the system PHD and the combined capacity of the supply sources. Equation 9-1: ES = (PHD – QS)(150 minutes), but in no case less than zero Where: ES = Equalizing Storage, in gallons PHD = Peak Hour Demand, in gpm QS = Sum of all installed and active sources, except emergency supply, in gpm. The capacities of the sources that supply each zone are sufficient to meet the peak hour demands of their zones. Therefore, the equalizing storage requirement for each supply area is zero. Standby Storage – Volume of the reservoir used to supply the water system under emergency conditions when supply facilities are out of service due to equipment failures, power outages, loss of supply, transmission main breaks, and any other situation that disrupts the supply source. DOH requires that standby storage be stored above an elevation that will provide a minimum pressure of 20 psi at all service connections throughout the system. The criteria for determining the standby storage requirements for the City’s system, which has multiple supply sources, is based on Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual, which requires average day demand and supply source capacity data. The amount required is sufficient to supply the system for a 48-hour period when the primary supply facility is out of service and the system is experiencing average day demands. Equation 9-3: SB = (2 days)[(ADD)(N) – tm (QS – QL)] Where: SB = Standby Storage, in gallons ADD = Average Day Demand per equivalent residential unit (ERU), in gallons per day (gpd) per ERU N = Number of ERUs QS = Sum of all installed and continuously available sources, except emergency supply, in gpm QL = The capacity of the largest source available to the system, in gpm tm = Time the remaining sources are pumped on the day when the largest source is not available, in minutes. Unless otherwise restricted, this value is 1,440 minutes. In addition to the standby storage requirements calculated from Equation 9-3, DOH recommends that the minimum standby storage volume be no less than 200 gallons per ERU. Fire Flow Storage – Volume of the reservoir used to supply water to the system at the maximum rate and duration required to extinguish a fire at the building with the highest fire flow CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-23 requirement. The magnitude of the fire flow storage is the product of the fire flow rate and duration of the system’s maximum fire flow requirement established by the local fire authority, the Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority. DOH requires that fire flow storage be stored above an elevation that will provide a minimum pressure of 20 psi at all points throughout the distribution system under MDD conditions. The fire flow storage requirements shown in the analyses that follow are based on the maximum fire flow requirements in each pressure zone. The maximum fire flow requirement in the 240 Zone is 5,000 gpm for a 4-hour duration, which is equivalent to 1,200,000 gallons. The maximum fire flow requirement in the 354.5 Zone is 1,650 gpm for a 2-hour duration, which is equivalent to 198,000 gallons. The maximum fire flow requirement in the 529 Zone operating area and in the 587 Zone operating area is 4,600 gpm for a 4-hour duration, which is equivalent to 1,104,000 gallons. The maximum fire flow requirement in the 485 Zone is 3,282 gpm for a 4-hour duration, which is equivalent to 787,680 gallons. The maximum fire flow requirement in the 590 Zone operating area is 4,600 gpm for a 4-hour duration, which is equivalent to 1,104,000 gallons. The maximum fire flow requirement in the future 640 Zone operating area is 3,500 gpm for a 3-hour duration, which is equivalent to 630,000 gallons. Dead Storage – Volume of the reservoir that cannot be used because it is stored at an elevation that does not provide system pressures that meet the minimum pressure requirements established by DOH without pumping. This unusable storage occupies the lower portion of most ground-level reservoirs. Water that is stored below an elevation that cannot provide a minimum pressure of 20 psi is considered dead storage for the analyses that follow. STORAGE ANALYSIS RESULTS System-Wide Storage The storage analyses are based on an evaluation of the existing storage facilities providing water to the City’s distribution system. The maximum combined storage capacity of the City’s reservoirs is 23.33 MG, as shown in Table 7-13. Operational storage is based on BPS setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Standby storage is based on providing 200 gallons of storage per ERU, which is more conservative than the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. There is currently 3.76 MG of dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in the water system, of which 3.65 MG is within the 590 Zone. The results of the existing storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-13, indicate that the existing (2018) system has a storage surplus of approximately 5.82 MG. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-24 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-13 System-Wide Storage Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity 23.33 23.33 30.28 30.28 Dead (Non-usable) Storage 3.76 3.76 6.06 6.06 Total Available Storage 19.57 19.57 24.22 24.22 Operational Storage 3.57 3.57 4.12 4.12 Equalizing Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Standby Storage 8.97 9.22 9.61 10.26 Fire Flow Storage 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 Total Required Storage 13.74 13.99 14.93 15.58 Surplus or Deficient Amount 5.82 5.58 9.29 8.64 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 The system’s future storage requirements, also shown in Table 7-13, were computed for the 10- and 20-year planning periods based on the corresponding demand projections shown in Chapter 4. The 10- and 20-year planning periods include additional usable storage within the existing 640 Tank that will become available to the system as part of the 640 Zone conversion project, and the construction of 3.00 MG of usable storage in the West Hill operating area. The City is projected to have a system-wide storage surplus through the 20-year planning period. Valley Operating Area 240 Zone Storage The City’s 240 Zone, which is provided storage by the 6 MG #2 and Guiberson Reservoirs, has an existing combined storage capacity of 9.00 MG, as shown in Table 7-14. Operational storage is based on source setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Standby storage is based on a rate of 200 gpd per ERU in the zone, which is more conservative than the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. There is currently no dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in the 240 Zone. The results of the storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-14, indicate that the 240 Zone storage facilities have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements through the 20-year planning period. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-25 Table 7-14 240 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 Dead (Non-usable) Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Available Storage 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 Operational Storage 0.49 0.49 0.49 0.49 Equalizing Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Standby Storage 5.15 5.29 5.49 5.97 Fire Flow Storage 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 Total Required Storage 6.84 6.98 7.18 7.65 Surplus or Deficient Amount 2.16 2.02 1.82 1.35 Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) As presented in Chapter 9, the Guiberson Reservoir is proposed to be replaced within the 20-year planning period. The City is considering constructing the replacement reservoir with a larger capacity than the 3.00 MG capacity of the existing reservoir, with the proposed reservoir capacity to be identified during the predesign and design phases of the project. The storage capacity evaluation presented in Table 7-14 assumes the Guiberson Reservoir storage volume to be 3.00 MG through the 20-year planning period, and any increase in storage volume that occurs when the Guiberson Reservoir is replaced will increase the surplus storage capacity available in the 240 Zone. West Hill Operating Area 354.5 Zone Storage The City’s 354.5 Zone, which is provided storage by the Reith Road Standpipe, has an existing storage capacity of 1.01 MG, as shown in Table 7-15. Operational storage is based on BPS setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Standby storage is based on the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual, which is more conservative than a rate of 200 gpd per ERU in the zone. There is currently 0.12 MG of dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in the 354.5 Zone. The results of the storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-15, indicate that the 354.5 Zone storage facility has sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements through the 20-year planning period. For conservatism, the future system 354.5 Zone storage evaluation shown in Table 7-15 does not include consideration for a future West Hill Reservoir that is proposed to be constructed in the 587 Zone to provide additional storage capacity in the West Hill operating area. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-26 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-15 354.5 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity 1.01 1.01 1.01 1.01 Dead (Non-usable) Storage 0.12 0.12 0.12 0.12 Total Available Storage 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 Operational Storage 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 Equalizing Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Standby Storage 0.13 0.13 0.16 0.16 Fire Flow Storage 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 Total Required Storage 0.57 0.57 0.59 0.60 Surplus or Deficient Amount 0.33 0.33 0.30 0.30 Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) 529 Zone Storage The City’s 529 Zone, which is currently provided storage by the Cambridge Tank, has an existing storage capacity of 0.30 MG, as shown in Table 7-16. Operational storage is based on BPS setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Standby storage is based the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual, which is more conservative than a rate of 200 gpd per ERU in the zone. There is currently no dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in the 529 Zone. The Cambridge Tank currently provides fire flow storage for not only the 529 Zone, but also the 575 and 587 Zones. The results of the storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-16, indicate that the Cambridge Tank does not have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements through the 20-year planning period. During a fire or emergency event, supply to the 529 Zone is initially provided by the Cambridge Tank, but as shown in Table 7-16, the Cambridge Tank capacity is significantly less than the volume required for fire flow. As the Cambridge Tank water level is reduced, Pump Station #4 is utilized to provide supply to the 529 Zone during fire or emergency events. Prior to 2028, it is expected that a new West Hill Reservoir will be constructed in the 587 Zone to provide adequate storage for the 529, 575, and 587 Zones, and improve redundancy in the West Hill operating area. The Cambridge Tank will remain operational following the completion of a future West Hill Reservoir and will be normally filled by water conveyed from the future West Hill Reservoir via a future PRV proposed to be installed at Pump Station #7. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-27 Table 7-16 529 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.30 Dead (Non-usable) Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Available Storage 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.30 Operational Storage 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 Equalizing Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Standby Storage 0.90 0.92 0.95 0.96 Fire Flow Storage 1.10 1.10 1.10 1.10 Total Required Storage 2.16 2.18 2.21 2.23 Surplus or Deficient Amount (1.86)(1.88)(1.91)(1.93) (1) A proposed 587 Zone West Hill reservoir will provide future system storage for the 529, 575, and 587 Zones. Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected1 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) 587 Zone Storage The City’s 587 Zone currently does not have water storage, and adequate fire flow storage is not available in the three West Hill operating zones with the highest hydraulic grades (529, 575, and 587 Zones). A future 587 Zone reservoir is expected to be constructed prior to 2028 to improve fire flow protection and reliability in the West Hill operating area. Table 7-17 presents the projected 2028 and 2038 storage capacity evaluation for the 587 Zone. The storage requirements of the 354.5, 529, and 575 Zones are included in the 587 Zone evaluation shown in Table 7-17, which indicate that the proposed 587 Zone reservoir will provide sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements of the 587 Zone operating area, which includes the entire West Hill operating area (354.5, 529, 575, and 587 Zones), through the 20-year planning period. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-28 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-17 587 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity ------5.30 5.30 Dead (Non-usable) Storage ------2.30 2.30 Total Available Storage ------3.00 3.00 Operational Storage ------0.55 0.56 Equalizing Storage ------0.00 0.00 Standby Storage ------0.65 0.66 Fire Flow Storage1 ------1.50 1.50 Total Required Storage ------2.70 2.72 Surplus or Deficient Amount ------0.31 0.28 (1) Existing maximum fire flow requirement in the 587 and 575 Zones is 4,600 gpm for 4 hours (Totem Middle School), resulting in a fire flow storage volume of 1.10 MG. The City anticipates redevelopment within the 587 Zone, and is planning for a future maximum fire flow requirement of 5,000 gpm for 5 hours in the 587 Zone, resulting in a fire flow storage volume of 1.50 MG. Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) East Hill Operating Area 590 Zone Storage The City’s 590 Zone, which is currently provided storage by the 3.5 MG Tank, the Blue Boy Standpipe, and the 640 Tank, has an existing combined storage capacity of 6.88 MG as shown in Table 7-18. Operational storage is based on BPS setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Standby storage is based on a rate of 200 gpd per ERU in the zone, which is more conservative than the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. There is currently 3.65 MG of dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in the 590 Zone, the majority of which will be eliminated following the 640 Zone conversion project that is described in more detail in Chapter 9. The results of the 590 Zone storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-18, indicate that the 590 Zone storage facilities do not have sufficient capacity to meet the existing storage requirements. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-29 Table 7-18 590 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity 6.88 6.88 4.50 4.50 Dead (Non-usable) Storage 3.65 3.65 1.32 1.32 Total Available Storage 3.23 3.23 3.17 3.17 Operational Storage 0.90 0.90 0.21 0.21 Equalizing Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Standby Storage 2.86 2.94 2.19 2.26 Fire Flow Storage 1.10 1.10 1.10 1.10 Total Required Storage 4.87 4.95 3.50 3.57 Surplus or Deficient Amount (1.64)(1.72)(0.33)(0.40) Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) Prior to 2028, the easterly portion of the 590 Zone is expected to be converted to a 640 Zone, which reduces the available and required storage in the 590 Zone. However, the City will be able to fill the 640 Tank to a maximum hydraulic grade of 645 feet following implementation of the 640 Zone conversion, resulting in approximately 1.65 MG of additional storage capacity. Additionally, the highest existing 590 Zone service connections will be transferred to the 640 Zone in the future, reducing the dead storage volume in the future 590 Zone storage facilities (Blue Boy Standpipe and the 3.5 MG Tank) by approximately 1.39 MG. Future surplus storage volume in the 640 Zone, presented in the 640 Zone Storage section of this chapter, will be available to the 590 Zone via multiple PRVs to resolve the projected 10- and 20-year planning period storage deficiencies shown in Table 7-18. 640 Zone Storage Storage in the 640 Zone will be provided by the existing 640 Tank, which is currently operated at a maximum hydraulic grade of 590 feet. In the future, the 640 Tank will provide 3.10 MG of usable storage to the 640 Zone and will be operated at a maximum hydraulic grade of 645 feet. Table 7-19 presents the projected 2028 and 2038 storage evaluation for the 640 Zone, and indicates that the 640 Tank has sufficient capacity to meet the future 640 Zone storage requirements through the 20-year planning period. The projected 640 Zone storage surplus is also sufficient to resolve the projected 590 Zone storage deficiencies in the 10- and 20-year planning periods. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-30 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-19 640 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity ------4.03 4.03 Dead (Non-usable) Storage ------0.93 0.93 Total Available Storage ------3.10 3.10 Operational Storage ------0.81 0.81 Equalizing Storage ------0.00 0.00 Standby Storage ------0.85 0.88 Fire Flow Storage ------0.63 0.63 Total Required Storage ------2.29 2.32 Surplus or Deficient Amount ------0.81 0.78 Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) The combined storage requirements of the 590 and 640 Zones following the 640 Zone conversion project is shown in Table 7-20. The combined 590 and 640 Zones storage requirements are based on the sum of the operational and standby storage volumes in the two zones. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. Fire flow storage is based on the maximum planning-level fire flow requirement in the 590 and 640 Zones, which is 4,600 gpm for 4 hours based on the requirements of the Fred Meyer located on SE 240th Street, The Home Depot located on 104th Avenue SE, and Kent-Meridian High School located on SE 256th Street. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-31 Table 7-20 Combined 590 and 640 Zone Future Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Maximum Storage Capacity ------8.53 8.53 Dead (Non-usable) Storage ------2.26 2.26 Total Available Storage ------6.27 6.27 Operational Storage ------1.02 1.02 Equalizing Storage ------0.00 0.00 Standby Storage ------3.04 3.14 Fire Flow Storage ------1.10 1.10 Total Required Storage ------5.16 5.26 Surplus or Deficient Amount ------1.11 1.01 Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) 485 Zone Storage The City’s 485 Zone, which is provided direct storage by the 125K Tank, has an existing storage capacity of 0.13 MG. The City’s 6 MG #1 Reservoir provides indirect storage to the 485 Zone via Pump Station #5, which pumps from the 6 MG #1 Reservoir to the 125K Tank and the 485 Zone. As described in the Supply Analysis Results section of this chapter and shown in Table 7-10, the City can utilize Pump Station #5 to provide supply to the 485 Zone during peak demand and emergency demand conditions. Therefore, the combined storage capacity of the 125K Tank and the 6 MG #1 Reservoir, 6.14 MG, is considered in the 485 Zone storage capacity evaluation shown in Table 7-21. Operational storage is based on BPS setpoints provided by the City. Equalizing storage is based on the results of Equation 9-1 from the DOH Water System Design Manual, with demands in Equation 9-1 equivalent to the maximum pumping capacity of Pump Station #5 to represent the maximum conveyance out of the 6 MG #1 Reservoir, and a supply rate equivalent to the Clark Springs capacity. Standby storage is based on a rate of 200 gpd per ERU in the zone, which is more conservative than the results of Equation 9-3 from the DOH Water System Design Manual. There is currently no dead storage (i.e., non-usable storage) in either reservoir. The results of the 485 Zone storage evaluation, as shown in Table 7-21, indicate that the 125K Tank and the 6 MG #1 Reservoir have sufficient capacity to meet the existing and future storage requirements of the 485 Zone through the 20-year planning period. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-32 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Table 7-21 485 Zone Storage Capacity Evaluation Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) 485 Zone Maximum Storage Capacity 6.14 6.14 6.14 6.14 485 Zone Dead (Non-usable) Storage 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Total Available Storage 6.14 6.14 6.14 6.14 Operational Storage 1.99 1.99 1.99 1.99 Equalizing Storage 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 Standby Storage 0.36 0.37 0.43 0.49 Fire Flow Storage 0.79 0.79 0.79 0.79 Total Required Storage 3.37 3.38 3.44 3.50 Surplus or Deficient Amount 2.77 2.76 2.70 2.64 Surplus or Deficient Storage (MG) Description Projected 2016 2018 Available/Usable Storage (MG) Required Storage (MG) FACILITY DEFICIENCIES In order to resolve the storage deficiency in the West Hill operating area (as shown within the 529 Zone Storage evaluation), a new 587 Zone reservoir will be constructed in the West Hill area. The City is considering a currently undeveloped property on the West Hill between 38th Avenue S and Military Road S, adjacent to S 248th Street. Construction of a new 587 Zone reservoir is described in Chapter 9. In order to resolve the storage deficiency in the City’s 590 Zone, the City is converting the easterly portion of the 590 Zone to a 640 Zone, which reduces the available and required storage in the 590 Zone. The City will be able to fill the 640 Tank to a maximum hydraulic grade of 645 feet following implementation of the 640 Zone conversion (currently, the maximum hydraulic grade of the 640 Tank is 590 feet), resulting in approximately 1.65 MG of additional storage capacity. Additionally, the highest existing 590 Zone service connections will be transferred to the 640 Zone in the future, reducing the dead storage volume in the future 590 Zone storage facilities by approximately 1.39 MG. The resulting storage evaluation for the combined 590 and 640 Zones indicates sufficient capacity will be available in the storage facilities to meet the requirements through the 20-year planning period. The City’s 2016 sanitary survey identified the need to retrofit or replace the air vents on the 6 MG #1 Reservoir, 125K Tank, Blue Boy Standpipe, Cambridge Tank, and the Reith Road Standpipe. The Cambridge Tank retrofit has been completed, and the 125K Tank retrofit is being designed in 2018 with construction planned for 2019. The retrofits for the remaining three tanks are scheduled to be completed by 2021, as identified in Chapter 9. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-33 DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSMISSION SYSTEM This section evaluates the City’s existing distribution and transmission system (i.e., water mains) to determine if they are adequately sized and looped to provide the necessary flow rates and pressures to meet the existing and future requirements of the system. This section also identifies deficiencies that are not related to the capacity of the water mains. ANALYSIS CRITERIA Distribution and transmission mains must be capable of adequately and reliably conveying water throughout the system at acceptable flow rates and pressures. The criteria used to evaluate the City’s distribution and transmission system are the state mandated requirements for Group A water systems contained in WAC 246-290-230 – Distribution Systems. The pressure analysis criteria state that the distribution system “…shall be designed with the capacity to deliver the design PHD quantity of water at 30 psi under PHD flow conditions measured at all existing and proposed service water meters.” It also states that if fire flow is to be provided, “… the distribution system shall also provide MDD plus the required fire flow at a pressure of at least 20 psi at all points throughout the distribution system.” Hydraulic analyses of the existing system were performed under existing PHD conditions to evaluate its current pressure capabilities and identify existing system deficiencies. The existing system also was analyzed under existing MDD conditions to evaluate the current fire flow capabilities and identify additional existing system deficiencies. Additional hydraulic analyses were then performed with the same hydraulic model under future PHD and MDD conditions and with the proposed improvements to demonstrate that the identified improvements will eliminate the deficiencies and meet the requirements far into the future. The following is a description of the hydraulic model, the operational conditions, and facility settings used in the analyses. HYDRAULIC MODEL Description A computer-based hydraulic model of the existing water system was updated to the CONNECT edition of the WaterGEMS® program (developed by Bentley Systems, Inc.) with the City’s most recent Geographic Information System (GIS) shapefile to reflect the best-known information on distribution system geometry and pipe characteristics, including diameter, material, and installation year. Hydraulic model pipe roughness coefficients were initialized with computed estimates based on the water main material and age information from the City’s water main GIS shapefile. Based on the premise that the internal surface of water mains become rougher as they get older, older water mains were assigned higher roughness coefficients than newer water mains. The junction node elevation data were updated using King County provided 5-foot contour data. A hydraulic model CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-34 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) node diagram, providing a graphical representation of the model of the water system, is contained in Appendix L. Demand Data The hydraulic model of the existing system contains demands based on 2016 individual customer meter water demand data provided by the City. Demand data for each parcel was distributed to the closest representative junction node of the model based on the recorded usage, which was then uniformly scaled to simulate the 2016 MDD and PHD. The peaking factors calculated in Chapter 4 were used to analyze the system under PHD and MDD conditions. The hydraulic model of the proposed system contains 10-year demand levels that are projected for the year 2028, and 20-year demand levels that are projected for the year 2038. The future demand distribution is based on planning area estimates identified in Chapter 3, which include population projections in Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) and employment projections in census tracts provided by the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC). The resulting ADD allocation for each pressure zone is shown in Table 7-22. Table 7-22 Pressure Zone Demand Allocation 2016 (Base) 2018 (Existing) 2028 (+10 years) 2038 (+20 years) 240 3,070 3,133 3,251 3,534 271 Alvord 12 12 16 20 308 Hilltop 0.4 0.4 1 1 339 Seattle 11 11 18 23 354.5 45 46 54 55 366 Stetson 2 2 3 3 368 Weiland 3 3 5 6 416 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 485 186 189 213 236 529 147 150 155 157 575 28 28 30 31 587 137 140 144 146 590 1,706 1,741 1,298 1,339 640 0.0 0.0 505 521 Total 5,348 5,458 5,691 6,074 Pressure Zone ADD (gpm) CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-35 Facilities The hydraulic model of the existing system contains all active, existing system facilities. For the proposed system analyses in the year 2028 and 2038, the hydraulic model contains all active existing system facilities and proposed system improvements identified in Chapter 9 for the 10- and 20-year planning periods, respectively. The facility settings for the pressure analyses corresponded to a PHD event in the water system. All sources of supply that currently are available to the system or will be available in the future for the years 2028 and 2038 analyses, during a peak period were operating at their normal summertime pumping rates. The reservoir levels were modeled to reflect full utilization of operational and equalizing storage. The operational conditions for the pressure analyses are summarized in Table 7-23. Table 7-23 Hydraulic Analyses Operational Conditions 2016 2028 (+10 years) 2038 (+20 years)2016 2028 (+10 years) 2038 (+20 years) Demand 2016 PHD 2028 PHD 2038 PHD 2016 MDD 2028 MDD 2038 MDD Garrison Creek Reservoir 237.75 237.75 237.75 234.53 234.53 234.53 Guiberson Reservoir 236.50 236.50 236.50 233.28 233.28 233.28 Reith Road Standpipe 345.20 345.20 345.20 337.46 337.46 337.46 6 MG #1 Reservoir 404.00 404.00 404.00 404.00 404.00 404.00 125K Tank 456.31 456.31 456.31 463.51 463.51 463.51 Cambridge Tank 519.35 519.35 519.35 499.11 499.11 499.11 3.5 MG Tank 586.40 586.40 586.40 571.79 560.45 560.45 Blue Boy Standpipe 586.40 586.40 586.40 563.09 551.75 551.75 640 Tank 579.00 620.60 620.60 564.39 601.54 601.54 Future West Hill Reservoir ---571.23 571.23 ---528.23 528.23 208th Street/ 212th Street Wellfield OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF Armstrong Springs Wells ON ON ON ON ON ON Clark Springs ON ON ON ON ON ON East Hill Well ON ON ON ON ON ON Garrison Creek Well ON ON ON ON ON ON Kent Springs ON ON ON ON ON ON O'Brien Well OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF Seven Oaks Well ON ON ON ON ON ON RWSS POD #3 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #3 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #4 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #5 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #6 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #7 ON ON ON ON ON ON Pump Station #8 ON ON ON ON ON ON Future West Hill BPS ---ON ON ---ON ON Future 640 Zone BPS (Blue Boy)---ON ON ---ON ON Future 640 Zone BPS (POD #3)------ON ------ON Description PHD Pressure Analyses Fire Flow Analyses Storage Facilities HGL (feet) Supply Facilities Status BPS Facilities Status CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-36 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) Separate fire flow analyses were performed on the system to size distribution system improvements and calculate fire flow availability. The hydraulic model for the fire flow analyses contained settings that correspond to MDD events. All sources of supply that currently are available to the system during a peak period were operating at their normal pumping rates, and reservoir levels were modeled to reflect full utilization of operational, equalizing, and fire flow storage based on the maximum planning-level fire flow requirement. Table 7-23 summarizes the operational conditions for the fire flow analyses for the existing and future planning periods. Calibration Hydraulic model calibration was completed during the preparation of this Water System Plan (WSP). Hydraulic model calibration is achieved by adjusting the roughness coefficients of the water mains in the model so the resulting pressures and flows closely match the pressures and flows from actual field tests under similar demand and operating conditions. Initial Darcy-Weisbach roughness coefficients were entered in the model based on computed estimates of the coefficients from available pipe age and material data. For example, older water mains were assigned higher roughness coefficients than newer water mains; thereby assuming that the internal surface of water pipe becomes rougher as it gets older. Additional calibration of the model was achieved using field flow and pressure data that were collected throughout the system during hydrant testing for this purpose. Hydrant flow tests were performed at 51 locations in late 2017, with hydrant flows, static pressures, and residual pressures measured during each test for use in calibrating the hydraulic model. Telemetry data for each of the City’s water system facilities were provided in 30-second intervals during the tests and used to initialize the settings of the facilities in the hydraulic model. Pressure transducers recording at 2-second intervals were installed throughout each pressure zone during the flow tests to verify the static and residual pressures at intermediate points in the system (between the water system facilities and the hydrant flow test locations). Hydraulic model calibration of the 51 locations was achieved by adjusting the roughness coefficients and connectivity of the water mains, adding check valves at appropriate locations, adding the “small” PRV within each PRV station in the hydraulic model, and updating BPS initial settings and controls. The identification of these differences was generally the result of sensitivity analyses, which consist of iterative model adjustments to assist in troubleshooting the cause of a discrepancy between field measurements and model calculations. Examples of sensitivity analyses performed for the City’s hydraulic model include temporarily opening or closing a PRV to identify if the PRV opened in the field but not in the model (or vice versa); temporarily adjusting the pressure setpoints of pumps or valves to determine the impact on system pressures; or temporarily closing pipes or adding check valves to pipes to confirm the presence of a zone valve or check valve at pressure zone boundaries. The hydraulic model’s calculated head loss during the flow tests was within plus or minus 4.3 psi (10 feet) of the field-measured head loss at all 51 hydrants that were flow tested, and within 2.2 psi (5 feet) at 41 of the 51 hydrants. The accuracy of the calibrated hydraulic model is consistent with the guidelines published by Walski et al. (Walski) in the 2003 Advanced Water Distribution Modeling and Management book, which suggests that the hydraulic model is able to CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-37 predict the hydraulic grade line (HGL) to within 5 to 10 feet at model calibration points during peak demands. A summary of the difference between the hydraulic model’s calculated head loss during the flow tests and the field-measured head loss at each flow test location is shown in Chart 7-2. Chart 7-2 Hydraulic Model Calibration Results Summary -5.0 -4.0 -3.0 -2.0 -1.0 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 ZonePressure Difference Between Field Measurements and Model Calculations (psi)Average Error per Zone Error per Test Location Walski Guideline -4.3 psi (-10 feet) Walski Guideline +4.3 psi (+10 feet) HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS RESULTS Several hydraulic analyses were performed to determine the capability of the system to meet the pressure and flow requirements identified in Chapter 5 and contained in WAC 246-290-230. The first analysis was performed to determine the pressures throughout the system under base year (i.e., 2016) PHD conditions. Subsequent analyses were performed to determine the pressures throughout the system under future 10- and 20-year PHD conditions. The results of the analyses were used to identify locations of low and high pressures. To satisfy the minimum pressure requirements, the pressure at all water service locations must be at least 30 psi during PHD conditions. In addition, the system should not have widespread areas with high pressures, generally considered to be more than 100 psi. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-38 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) The City provides at least 30 psi to all existing service connections during PHD conditions, although there are multiple areas receiving less than 40 psi during PHD conditions, as shown in Table 7-24. Pressure zone improvements identified in Chapter 9 increase the pressure above 40 psi at more than half of the low-pressure locations shown in Table 7-24 within the 20-year planning period. All water mains with pressures greater than 100 psi, as identified from the analyses, are generally located along pressure zone boundaries. Water services in these areas, as with any future services, are required to be equipped with individual PRVs to limit the maximum pressure to 80 psi. Figure 7-1 presents a summary of the pressures provided throughout the water system during base year (i.e., 2016) PHD conditions. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-39 Table 7-24 Pressure Analysis Summary 2016 +10 years w/ Proposed Improvements1 +20 years w/ Proposed Improvements2 +20 years w/ All Improvements3 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood in cul-de-sac of Carter Pl, east of Van De Vanter Ave 339 Seattle Zone J-2105 30 34 34 34 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of Reith Rd and S 253rd St 354.5 Zone J-1674 32 32 32 32 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of SE 248th St and 120th Ave SE 590 Zone J-26570 32 55 55 55 Parks and Open Space Neighborhood just west of 124th Ave SE at SE 248th St 590 Zone J-26236 33 55 55 55 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of SE 240th St and 116th Ave SE (First Christian Church)590 Zone J-2547 34 65 64 64 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood near SE 244th St and 119th Ave SE 590 Zone J-2483 34 62 62 62 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood adjacent to and north of S 254th St and 45th Ave S 354.5 Zone J-533 35 35 35 35 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood in cul-de-sac of SE 237th Pl, east of 112th Ave SE 590 Zone J-2403 36 74 73 72 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of S 264th St and 34th Ave S 529 Zone J-1732 36 36 36 36 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of E James St and N Lenora Ave 240 Zone J-131 38 39 39 40 Medium Density Multifamily Near intersection of S 248th St and 98th Ave S 485 Zone J-1601 39 39 39 40 Single Family 4.5 Units/Acre Neighborhood near 94th Pl S and S 216th Pl 240 Zone J-25901 39 40 40 40 Single Family 8 Units/Acre Adjacent to 98th Ave S, between S 248th St and S 243rd St 485 Zone J-2091 40 40 40 42 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Approximately the 9700 block between S 239th Pl and S 243rd St 485 Zone J-26787 41 41 41 43 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of 94th Ave S (Hamilton Rd) and S 233rd Pl 485 Zone J-2036 42 42 42 45 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood along 92nd Ave S, north of S 222nd St 485 Zone J-25910 144 143 143 147 Medium Density Multifamily Near intersection of Summit Ave N and E Smith St 485 Zone J-472 129 129 128 131 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of Alexander Ave and E Cherry Hill St 485 Zone J-1143 129 128 128 130 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhoods along 100th Ave SE, north of S 228th Pl 590 Zone J-26408 126 132 132 128 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of Reiten Rd and E Maclyn St 485 Zone J-26929 124 124 124 125 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of Alvord Ave N and Spring Ave N 485 Zone J-2367 120 120 120 123 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersecton of S 222nd St and 93rd Ave S 485 Zone J-26933 120 120 120 123 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of E Cherry Hill St and Olympic Way 485 Zone J-1589 120 120 119 121 Single Family 6 Units/Acre NW side of Scenic Way neighborhood, near Central Ave S and E Titus St 339 Seattle Zone J-750 114 118 118 118 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of 96th Pl S and 97th Ave S 485 Zone J-2737 113 113 113 117 Single Family 6 Units/Acre East side of S 243rd St neighborhood 587 Zone J-263 110 105 106 106 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of SE 228th St and 101st Pl SE 590 Zone J-1799 107 113 113 110 Parks and Open Space Along Canyon Drive near Kent Meridian HS field 590 Zone J-26746 105 112 112 105 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Near intersection of 104th Ave SE and SE 267th St 590 Zone J-648 105 114 114 107 Single Family 6 Units/Acre Neighborhood near intersection of S 262nd St and 46th Ave S 529 Zone J-1653 103 103 103 104 Parks and Open Space Near intersection of S 252nd St and 97th Pl S 590 Zone J-641 102 108 109 101 Medium Density Multifamily Near intersection of Lake Fenwick Rd and 46th Ave S 354.5 Zone J-993 101 101 101 101 Single Family 8 Units/Acre Neighborhood along Kensington Ave S, south of Reiten Rd 339 Seattle Zone J-1576 97 101 101 101 (1) Includes 10-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and assumed high priority water main replacement improvements. (2) Includes 20-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and does not include medium or low priority water main replacement improvements. (3) Includes 20-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and all medium and low priority water main replacement projects. Junction No. Existing Pressure ZoneApproximate LocationLand Use Pressure (psi) Low Pressure Areas High Pressure Areas CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-40 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) The second set of analyses was performed to determine the capability of the water system to provide fire flow throughout the water system under base year MDD conditions. A separate fire flow analysis was performed for each node in the model to determine the available fire flow at a minimum residual pressure of 20 psi in the main adjacent to the hydrant and a maximum allowable water main velocity of 8 feet per second (fps). More than 3,600 fire flow analyses were performed to comprehensively evaluate the water system. For each node analyzed, the resulting fire flow was compared to its general planning-level fire flow requirement, which was assigned according to its land use classification. As is typical of most water systems, the City’s distribution system was constructed to meet fire flow requirements that were in place at the time of construction. Land use classification changes and/or increases in fire flow requirements over time may create deficiencies. A summary of the results of the base year (2016) fire flow analyses is presented in Figure 7-2. Table 4-11 in Chapter 4 lists the general planning-level fire flow requirements for each land use classification. Since the fire flow requirement varies for buildings within each land use classification, the land use based fire flow requirements are only used as a general target for the primary purpose of the system-wide analyses that were performed for this WSP. Additional improvements may be needed in areas where actual fire flow requirements exceed the planning-level targets and shall be the responsibility of the developer. The results of the fire flow analyses were used to identify undersized water mains and proposed water main improvements based on the general planning-level fire flow requirements and current design criteria, which is not necessarily the same requirements and criteria that were in place when current developments and water main were constructed. The Puget Sound Regional Fire Authority provided the City the fire flow requirements for the largest structures in each pressure zone if the structures were to be new construction based on current regulations and guidelines. These fire flow requirements are shown in Table 7-25, along with the fire flow availability at these locations in the existing system, for future planning periods in the City’s existing system, and for future planning periods with the improvements identified in Chapter 9. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-41 Table 7-25 Large Structure Fire Flow Analysis Summary 2016 +10 years w/ Proposed Improvements1 +20 years w/ Proposed Improvements2 +20 years w/ All Improvements3 Amazon Fulfillment Center 20403 68th Ave S 240 Zone J-26014 4,666 3,749 4,647 6,000 4,600 Carpet Exchange 9021 S 180th St 240 Zone J-26488 3,876 3,903 3,900 6,000 5,000 Farrington Court Retirement 516 Kenoshia Ave 240 Zone J-27093 856 969 970 6,000 4,800 Kent North Corporate Park 7611 & 7691 S 180th St 240 Zone J-27134 1,391 1,406 1,404 1,404 5,000 Regional Justice Center 401 4th Ave N 240 Zone J-27091 1,910 1,878 2,801 6,000 5,000 Stafford Suites Retirement 112 Kennebeck Ave 240 Zone J-779 740 900 1,248 4,684 3,450 Lake Fenwick Estate Apts.24849 46th Ave S 354.5 Zone J-27094 1,750 1,908 1,893 1,893 1,650 Kent Church of the Nazarene 930 E James St 485 Zone J-2111 418 432 432 1,382 3,282 Fire Station 73 26512 Military Rd S 529 Zone J-854 1,253 1,253 1,382 1,382 1,500 Star Lake Elementary4 4014 S 270th St 529 Zone J-798 ---------777 3,163 Trinity Reformed Church 3807 Reith Road 529 Zone J-27096 1,416 5,649 5,927 6,000 2,013 Totem Middle School 26630 40th Ave S 575 Zone J-27095 1,235 850 879 1,594 4,600 Cornerstone Baptist Church 25030 Military Rd 587 Zone J-1749 1,414 2,581 2,522 2,217 1,725 Sunny Crest Elementary 24629 42nd Ave S 587 Zone J-26671 1,198 1,199 1,207 5,039 3,594 West Hill Plaza 24700 36th Ave S 587 Zone J-27092 (N/A)2,376 1,763 6,000 2,200 Home Depot 26120 104th Ave SE 590 Zone J-1100 5,010 3,457 3,338 6,000 4,600 Kent-Meridian High School 10020 SE 256th St 590 Zone J-26269 4,046 4,035 4,012 6,000 4,600 (1) Includes 10-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and assumed high priority water main replacement improvements. (2) Includes 20-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and does not include medium or low priority water main replacement improvements. (3) Includes 20-year CIP projects presented in Chapter 9, and all medium and low priority water main replacement projects. (4) Fire protection provided by Highline Water District. Target Fire Flow (gpm) Location Description Address Existing Pressure Zone Junction No. Available Fire Flow (gpm) Once all deficiencies were identified based on the general planning-level fire flow requirements, proposed water main improvements were included in the model, and pressure and fire flow analyses were performed throughout the system to demonstrate that the improvements will eliminate the deficiencies and meet the current flow and pressure requirements. These analyses were modeled under projected year 2028 and 2038 MDD conditions to ensure that the improvements are sized sufficiently to meet the future systems’ needs. A description of these improvements and a figure showing their locations are presented in Chapter 9, and the results of the 20-year fire flow analyses is presented in Figures 7-3 and 7-4, based on the improvements scheduled to be completed within the 20-year planning period as identified in Chapter 9 (and not including medium or low priority water main replacement projects). A summary of the fire flow deficiencies and limitations in the 2038 planning period with the proposed 20-year improvements is as follows. • 240 Zone: No widespread limitation, fire flows largely localized issues with 6-inch or 8-inch main being located adjacent to land uses with fire flow requirements in excess of 3,000 gpm. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-42 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) • 271 Alvord: Limited by 8-inch main downstream of PRV, which was installed in 2012. Fire flow in zone limited to approximately 1,300 gpm due to this piping. • 339 Seattle: Limited by 6-inch main downstream of PRV, which was installed in 2006. Fire flow in zone limited to approximately 750 gpm due to this piping. • 366 Stetson: Limited by 6-inch main downstream of PRV, which was installed in 2012. Fire flow in zone limited to approximately 750 gpm due to this piping. • 368 Weiland: Limited by 6-inch main upstream and downstream of PRV, which was installed in 1993. Fire flow in zone limited to approximately 680 gpm due to this piping. • 485 Zone: o South of SR 516: 6-inch main throughout neighborhood limiting fire flow to approximately 1,100 gpm. o North of 234th Street: limited by 8-inch main on either side of the 234th and 96th PRV. Fire flow in vicinity limited to 1,000 to 1,400 gpm. • 590 and 640 Zones: Fire flow limitations largely localized issues at dead-ends, or as a result of 6-inch main within neighborhoods. • West Hill Zones: Fire flow limitations largely localized issues at dead-ends, or as a result of 6-inch main within neighborhoods. DEFICIENCIES Several areas throughout the system have sufficient fire flow; however, high water velocities are experienced in the system because the water mains are undersized to carry the demands and fire flows at acceptable water velocities. Operating the system with high water velocities can potentially damage the system due to the high pressure surges that commonly occur with high water velocities. Some areas of the system have water mains that are more than 50 years old, which is approaching or beyond the average life expectancy of water mains of this vintage. Approximately 23 percent of the City’s water main is cast iron pipe. Most of the cast iron pipe is located in the older areas of the City. The City is planning to replace the aging water main in the future, as shown in the schedule of planned improvements in Chapter 9. All new water main installations are required to use ductile iron water main in accordance with the City’s Water System Standards, a copy of which is included in Appendix G. TELEMETRY AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL SYSTEM This section evaluates the City’s existing telemetry and supervisory control system to identify deficiencies related to its condition and current operational capability. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-43 EVALUATION AND DEFICIENCIES The water system has a Headquarters telemetry control panel at the Public Works Operations Building at 5821 South 240th Street. System facilities, including source, storage, and pumping, can be monitored with the telemetry system. The City performs regular calibration checks of the telemetry system components, including annual inspections of all telemetry recording instruments and mechanical flow meters. The City continually strives to improve the capabilities of the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system, and has plans to implement remote totalizer reading capabilities, which will allow for system-wide supply totals to be obtained instantaneously to allow for better recordkeeping of supply and consumption. There are no known deficiencies with the existing telemetry/SCADA system. SYSTEM CAPACITY This section evaluates the capacity of the City’s existing water system components (e.g., supply, storage, and transmission) to determine the maximum number of ERUs it can serve. Once determined, system capacity becomes useful in calculating how much capacity is available in the water system to support new customers that apply for water service through the building permit process. The system capacity information, together with the projected growth of the system expressed in ERUs, as shown in Chart 4-7 of Chapter 4, also provides the City with a schedule of when additional system capacity is needed. ANALYSIS CRITERIA The capacity of the City’s system was determined from the limiting capacity of the water rights, source, transmission, and storage facilities. The supply capacity analysis was based on the limiting capacity of the supply facilities and the system’s MDD per ERU. The transmission capacity analysis was based on the total capacity of the transmission system with a maximum pipeline velocity of 5 fps for the PHD analysis and 8 fps for the MDD plus fire flow analysis. The transmission capacity analysis considered the limiting supply requirement between the system’s PHD and the MDD plus the maximum fire flow requirement for the system. The transmission system includes the following components. • 31-inch-diameter Kent Springs Transmission Main (240 Zone). • 12-inch-diameter Kent Springs Transmission Main (590 Zone). • 21-inch-diameter Clark Springs Transmission Main. • 16-inch-diameter transmission main downstream of the Garrison Creek Well and Reservoir site. • 16-inch-diameter transmission main downstream of the 208th/212th Wellfield site. • 12-inch-diameter transmission main downstream of the East Hill Well site. • Two 16-inch-diameter transmission mains downstream of the Guiberson Reservoir site. CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-44 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) The storage capacity analysis was based on the storage capacity for equalizing and standby storage and the computed storage requirement per ERU. Operational and fire flow storage capacity were excluded from the storage analysis because these components are not directly determined by water demand or ERUs. For the analyses, a reserve amount equivalent to the existing operational and fire flow storage requirements were deducted from the total available storage capacity to determine the storage capacity available for equalizing and standby storage. This storage capacity available for equalizing and standby storage was divided by the existing number of ERUs presented in Chapter 4 to determine the storage requirement per ERU. The annual water rights capacity evaluation was based on the existing annual water rights, as summarized in Chapter 6, and the system’s average day demand per ERU. The instantaneous water rights capacity evaluation was based on the existing instantaneous water rights, as summarized in Chapter 6, and the system’s MDD per ERU. The ERU-based demand data was derived from the average day demand of the system and demand peaking factors from Chapter 4. CAPACITY ANALYSIS RESULTS A summary of the results of the existing system capacity analysis is shown in Table 7-26. The results of the existing (2018) system capacity analysis indicate that the limiting capacity of the system is storage, which can support up to a maximum of approximately 73,972 ERUs. The existing water system has a surplus of approximately 27,893 ERUs based on this limiting component. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) 7-45 Table 7-26 System Capacity Analysis Base Year Existing 2028 2038 (+10 years)(+20 years) Average Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)1 172 171 171 171 Maximum Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)1 373 371 371 371 Peak Hour Demand per ERU (gal/day)1 546 542 542 542 Water Rights Capacity - Annual Average Based (gal/day)30,134,126 30,134,126 30,134,126 30,134,126 Average Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)172 171 171 171 Water Rights Annual Average Based Source Capacity (ERUs)175,500 176,674 176,674 176,674 Water Rights Capacity - Instantaneous Based (gal/day)46,002,240 46,002,240 46,002,240 46,002,240 Maximum Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)373 371 371 371 Maximum Day Based Source Capacity (ERUs)123,216 124,040 124,040 124,040 Source Treatment Capacity - Maximum Day Based (gal/day)36,227,520 36,227,520 36,227,520 36,227,520 Maximum Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)373 371 371 371 Maximum Day Based Source Treatment Capacity (ERUs)97,035 97,684 97,684 97,684 Maximum Equalizing & Standby Storage Capacity (gal)14,794,367 14,794,367 18,898,504 18,898,504 Equalizing & Standby Storage Requirement per ERU (gal)200 200 200 200 Maximum Storage Capacity (ERUs)73,972 73,972 94,493 94,493 Transmission Capacity (gal/day)36,273,200 36,273,200 36,273,200 36,273,200 Peak Hour Demand per ERU (gal/day)546 542 542 542 Maximum Transmission Capacity (ERUs)238,794 240,391 240,391 240,391 Transmission Capacity (gal/day)35,222,880 35,222,880 35,222,880 35,222,880 MDD + Maximum Fire Flow Requirement (gpm)16,629 16,867 17,375 18,208 Maximum Day Demand per ERU (gal/day)373 371 371 371 Maximum Transmission Capacity (ERUs)151,741 151,831 149,860 146,627 Maximum System Capacity (ERUs)73,972 73,972 94,493 94,493 Limiting Facility Storage Storage Storage Storage Maximum System Capacity (ERUs)73,972 73,972 94,493 94,493 Projected ERUs 44,854 46,079 48,049 51,283 Unused Available System Capacity (ERUs)29,118 27,893 46,443 43,210 (1) Includes distribution system leakage. Transmission Capacity: MDD + Fire Flow Based (8 fps) Maximum System Capacity Unused Available System Capacity Description Projected 2016 2018 Demands Per ERU Basis Water Rights Capacity: Annual Average Based Water Rights Capacity: Instantaneous Based Source Capacity: Maximum Day Based Storage Capacity Transmission Capacity: PHD Based (5 fps) CHAPTER 7 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 7-46 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH7.DOC (9/30/2019 1:10 PM) A summary of the results of the 10-year projected system capacity analysis also is shown in Table 7-26. The 10-year projected system capacity analysis includes improvements that are planned to be completed within the 10-year planning period, as described in Chapter 9. The primary improvements that impact the system capacity analysis are the proposed construction of a West Hill Reservoir and the 640 Zone conversion, which increases the available storage volume in the existing 640 Tank. The results of the 10-year projected system capacity analysis indicate that the storage capacity increases to 94,493 ERUs, and the limiting component remains storage. The system is projected to have a surplus of approximately 46,443 ERUs in 2028 if the improvements are completed as planned. The water system’s projected 2038 capacity is 94,493 ERUs, based on the same storage limitations as projected in 2028. In 2038, the system is projected to have a surplus of approximately 43,210 ERUs if the improvements are completed as planned. Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 TH S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Ke nt Ci ty Li mi ts Ci ty of Kent Poten tialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Un incorporat ed KingCounty (Outs ide UGA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area City of Kent Retail WaterService Area (Updated) Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Interti e PRV Kent Transmi ssion Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hillt op Zone 339 Seattl e Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetso n Zone 368 We iland Zon e 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone PHD Pressure Under 30 psi 30 to 40 p si 40 to 80 p si 80 to 100 psi Over 100 psi J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 7-1 EXISTING PHD PRESSURES.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 7-1City of KentCity of KentBase Year (2016) PHD Pressures2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date show n on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea 240Zone 587Zone 529Zone 575Zone 354.5Zone 590Zone 366StetsonZone 368WeilandZone 339SeattleZone 271AlvordZone 485Zone308HilltopZone Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue BoyStandpipe0.97 MG GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG 6 MG #2Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #5 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Garrison C reekWell Tacoma POD #3 Sum mi t-L a n d sburgR dSR 18Witte Rd SESE 240 St SE 244 St 148 Av SESE 256 St 187 Av SE196 Av SE180 Av SEMapleValleyBlkDiamond144 Av SE152 Av SE216 Av SE193 Av SESE W ax RdS E K e n t K a n g le y R d164 Av SECo v i n g t o n Wy SESE Kent Kangley Rd164 Av SESE Wax RdWitte Rd SESR 18SR18SE 240 St SE K ent K angley Rd SE 240 St SE 240 St Witt e Rd S E SE 240 St 180 Av SESE 240 St Witte Rd SESR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St SR 18164 Av SESE Wax RdSR 18MapleValley Blk Di amon d SR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St Clark Springs Kent SpringsArmstrong SpringsWells Lak eMeridian PipeLake Armstrong SpringsWells Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 Clark SpringsTransmission Main Kent SpringsTransmission Main Tacoma POD #1 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Lak eWilderness Sp rin g Sources and Tran smissio n Mains1" = 4,000' A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 TH S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Ke nt Ci ty Li mi ts Ci ty of Kent Poten tialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Un incorporat ed KingCounty (Outs ide UGA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Interti e PRV Kent Transmi ssion Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hillt op Zone 339 Seattl e Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetso n Zone 368 We iland Zon e 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone Fire Flow Under 1,500 gpm 1,501 to 2 ,500 gpm 2,501 to 3 ,500 gpm 3,501 to 4 ,500 gpm Over 4,5 00 g pm J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 7-2 EXISTING FF AVAILABILITY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 7-2City of KentCity of KentBase Year (2016)2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date show n on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea 240Zone 587Zone 529Zone 575Zone 354.5Zone 590Zone 366StetsonZone 368WeilandZone 339SeattleZone 271AlvordZone 485Zone308HilltopZone Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue BoyStandpipe0.97 MG GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG 6 MG #2Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #5 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Garrison C reekWell Tacoma POD #3 Sum mi t-L a n d sburgR dSR 18Witte Rd SESE 240 St SE 244 St 148 Av SESE 256 St 187 Av SE196 Av SE180 Av SEMapleValleyBlkDiamond144 Av SE152 Av SE216 Av SE193 Av SESE W ax RdS E K e n t K a n g le y R d164 Av SECo v i n g t o n Wy SESE Kent Kangley Rd164 Av SESE Wax RdWitte Rd SESR 18SR18SE 240 St SE K ent K angley Rd SE 240 St SE 240 St Witt e Rd S E SE 240 St 180 Av SESE 240 St Witte Rd SESR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St SR 18164 Av SESE Wax RdSR 18MapleValley Blk Di amon d SR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St Clark Springs Kent SpringsArmstrong SpringsWells Lak eMeridian PipeLake Armstrong SpringsWells Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 Clark SpringsTransmission Main Kent SpringsTransmission Main Tacoma POD #1 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Lak eWilderness Sp rin g Sources and Tran smissio n Mains1" = 4,000' A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila Fire Flow Availability Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER RDPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH STKENT-DESMOINESR D 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N DWAYCOVI NGT ON WAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 T H ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST 259 T H P L 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24T HA V E S 2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDSE 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESSTAR L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE196THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 T H S T PETROVI TSKY RD196THST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLAC K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDSV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES244TH S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITH RD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESGR EE N R I VERRD 2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Ke nt Ci ty Li mi ts Ci ty of Kent Poten tialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Un incorporat ed KingCounty (Outs ide UGA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Interti e PRV Kent Transmi ssion Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hillt op Zone 339 Seattl e Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetso n Zone 368 We iland Zon e 485 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Fire Flow Under 1,500 gpm 1,501 to 2 ,500 gpm 2,501 to 3 ,500 gpm 3,501 to 4 ,500 gpm Over 4,5 00 g pm J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 7-3 20YR FF AVAILABILITY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 7-3City of KentCity of KentProjected 20-year Fire Flow Availability2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date show n on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea 240Zone 587Zone 529Zone 587Zone 354.5Zone 590Zone 366StetsonZone 368WeilandZone 339SeattleZone 271AlvordZone 485Zone308HilltopZone Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue B oy Standpipe0.97 MGandProposed 640 Zone BPS #1 GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Tacoma POD #3and Proposed 640 Zone BPS #2 Sum mi t-L a n d sburgR dSR 18Witte Rd SESE 240 St SE 244 St 148 Av SESE 256 St 187 Av SE196 Av SE180 Av SEMapleValleyBlkDiamond144 Av SE152 Av SE216 Av SE193 Av SESE W ax RdS E K e n t K a n g le y R d164 Av SECo v i n g t o n Wy SESE Kent Kangley Rd164 Av SESE Wax RdWitte Rd SESR 18SR18SE 240 St SE K ent K angley Rd SE 240 St SE 240 St Witt e Rd S E SE 240 St 180 Av SESE 240 St Witte Rd SESR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St SR 18164 Av SESE Wax RdSR 18MapleValley Blk Di amon d SR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St Clark Springs Kent SpringsArmstrong SpringsWells Lak eMeridian PipeLake Armstrong SpringsWells Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 Clark SpringsTransmission Main Kent SpringsTransmission Main Tacoma POD #1 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Lak eWilderness Sp rin g Sources and Tran smissio n Mains1" = 4,000' A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila w/ City-Funded & High Priority Improvements.Proposed West Hill Reservoir ProposedWest H ill Pump Station 640Zone Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMILITARY RD SJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TIT US S T 192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST K E N T -D E S M O IN E S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST WILLIS ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN RD24THAVES2 2 8 TH S T 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE6THAVES281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST 292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KANGLEY RD104THAVESE218TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST JASONAVEN112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 TH S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242 N DST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEAST VALLEY HWY SINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEDRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Ke nt Ci ty Li mi ts Ci ty of Kent Poten tialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Un incorporat ed KingCounty (Outs ide UGA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Interti e PRV Kent Transmi ssion Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hillt op Zone 339 Seattl e Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetso n Zone 368 We iland Zon e 485 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Planning-Level Fire FlowRequirement Met? True False J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 7-4 20YR FF SATISFIED.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity Map Figure 7-4City of KentCity of KentProjected 20-yr Junctions Exceeding FF Req't2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date show n on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea 240Zone 587Zone 529Zone 587Zone 354.5Zone 590Zone 366StetsonZone 368WeilandZone 339SeattleZone 271AlvordZone 485Zone308HilltopZone Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue B oy Standpipe0.97 MGandProposed 640 Zone BPS #1 GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Tacoma POD #3and Proposed 640 Zone BPS #2 Sum mi t-L a n d sburgR dSR 18Witte Rd SESE 240 St SE 244 St 148 Av SESE 256 St 187 Av SE196 Av SE180 Av SEMapleValleyBlkDiamond144 Av SE152 Av SE216 Av SE193 Av SESE W ax RdS E K e n t K a n g le y R d164 Av SECo v i n g t o n Wy SESE Kent Kangley Rd164 Av SESE Wax RdWitte Rd SESR 18SR18SE 240 St SE K ent K angley Rd SE 240 St SE 240 St Witt e Rd S E SE 240 St 180 Av SESE 240 St Witte Rd SESR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St SR 18164 Av SESE Wax RdSR 18MapleValley Blk Di amon d SR 18SR 18SR 18SR 18SE 256 St Clark Springs Kent SpringsArmstrong SpringsWells Lak eMeridian PipeLake Armstrong SpringsWells Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 Clark SpringsTransmission Main Kent SpringsTransmission Main Tacoma POD #1 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main Lak eWilderness Sp rin g Sources and Tran smissio n Mains1" = 4,000' A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila w/ City-Funded & High Priority Imprvmts.Proposed West Hill Reservoir ProposedWest H ill Pump Station 640Zone Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-1 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT 8 | OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM WATER DEPARTMENT GENERAL INFORMATION The City of Kent Water Department’s current mailing address and phone number is as follows. City of Kent Water Department Mailing Address: 220 4th Avenue South Kent, Washington 98032-5895 Phone: (253) 856-5600 Fax: (253) 856-6600 City of Kent Water Department’s Site Address: City of Kent Water Department 5821 South 240th Kent, Washington 98032-5895 State Department of Health Identification Number: 381501 State Department of Health Contact Person: Ms. Brietta Carter, P.E. State Department of Health 20425 72nd Avenue South Bldg. 2, Suite 310 Kent, Washington 98032-2358 (253) 395-6770 State Department of Health After Business Hours Hotline: 1 (877) 481-4901 (Weekends, Evenings, Holidays) WATER SYSTEM ORGANIZATION, MANAGEMENT, AND PERSONNEL The City of Kent (City) is a municipality organized with an elected mayor/council type of government. Overall City management, including Public Works, is provided by a City Operations Manager who acts under the direction of the Mayor and City Council. The Public Works Director manages the entire Public Works Department, including an Engineering Division that provides support to all of the Public Works divisions. A Public Works Operations Manager oversees the operation of the Public Works Maintenance Division, which includes the Water Department. The water system is operated and maintained under the direct supervision of a Water System Manager, who holds the Water Distribution Manager 4 certification required by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH). The Water System Manager and Public Works Deputy Director/Operations Manager handle the routine management decisions for the Water Department. The Public Works Director is involved with all decisions of a significant nature, including the planning for future needs. All major policy decisions and capital requests are reviewed and approved by the Mayor/City Council/Operations Manager. The following sections identify functions in the City Water Department, and an asterisk (*) denotes specifically qualified and licensed/certified personnel CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT necessary for water system operation in accordance with the requirements of DOH. Figure 8-1 presents an organizational chart of the internal organization of the Water Department. Figure 8-1 City of Kent Water Department Organization Chart CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-3 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT NORMAL DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS Management, supervision, and direction is provided by the Water System Manager.* The Field Supervisors implement and follow through on the planned schedules for operation and maintenance of the water system, and implement emergency repairs under the direction of the Water System Manager. Routine repair needs are often requested or reported by customers or citizens of Kent, by meter reader personnel, or by other City staff; and are prioritized and merged with the work schedules by the Field Supervisors* for their specific areas of responsibility. The Water System Manager is required to hold a State of Washington Water Distribution Manager 4 (WDM 4) certification. PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE Weekly work schedules and personnel assignments are prepared by the Field Supervisors* and reviewed with the Water System Manager. Ongoing preventative maintenance programs are improved upon continuously by the field personnel, along with new programs, under the direction of the Field Supervisors and the Water System Manager. The implementation of an Infrastructure Management System (Cityworks) is in progress and will be used to track system component inventory, record maintenance history, produce preventative maintenance work schedules, and predict expected life for the water system infrastructure. FIELD ENGINEERING Three technical groups support the engineering needs of the water system. The general areas of responsibility are identified in the sections that follow and are shown with the group that normally handles the work in that area. Consulting Engineers* Consulting engineers are typically retained to perform specialized studies related to the water system, such as this Water System Plan (WSP). They also are retained for specialized design, planning, and construction needs such as water quality studies and system planning, water storage reservoirs, treatment systems, pump stations, hydraulic analyses, and structural improvements. Consulting engineers are considered Engineer of Record on many of the City’s projects, and as such, are required to be registered as Professional Engineers in the State of Washington in the specific engineering application that is required for a given project. Public Works Operations Engineers* The City of Kent’s Public Works Operations Engineers typically are registered Professional Engineers. These individuals typically are responsible for specialized projects and smaller design and construction needs that do not require assistance from outside consultants. These include completion of water treatment and distribution project management, water system construction standards, construction plan review, Geographic Information System (GIS) conversion and implementation, water system planning, and capital project coordination. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Public Works Engineering* Employees of the Public Works Engineering group normally design and manage distribution water system projects, and manage developer improvements to the water system, water tank painting and structural improvements, water main replacements, and construction standards. A variety of certifications are applicable to this category of Public Works staff, primarily registered Professional Engineers. WATER QUALITY MONITORING Daily system monitoring of water quality and the required water system monitoring is performed by the Water Source and Supply Staff of the Water Department, under the direction of the Water System Manager, a WDM 4 in compliance with DOH requirements. Water treatment plant operation is performed by Water Treatment Plant Operator 2 (WTPO-2) certified personnel,* as required by DOH, under the direction of the Water System Manager. In-house staff performs most routine water analysis functions daily, and a State-certified contract laboratory is used for compliance monitoring requirements. EMERGENCY RESPONSE This section provides a brief overview of the key staff responsible for emergency response as it relates to the water system. The City maintains a comprehensive City-wide emergency response plan that is used in the event of an emergency. The emergency contact list is located in the Water Facilities Control Center at 5821 S. 240th Street, Kent, Washington 98032. Additional information of the basic elements of that plan is provided later in this chapter. The water system emergency response program itself is classified as a confidential document due to the critical nature of maintaining water system security as a matter of practicality, and in accordance with the Homeland Security Act. After Hours Emergency Personnel The Water System Manager is on-call at all times, available by telephone 24 hours a day. The City’s Police Department maintains call-out lists of all Water Department personnel, as well as procedures for contacting them during emergencies or for customer complaints. Two Water Department personnel are normally on 24 hour standby duty, with cell phones and a City vehicle available for use after hours, on weekends during the higher demand months, and on holidays. Normal Working Hours Emergency Personnel Most emergencies during normal working hours are routed through Administration Staff for prioritization and dispatch to field crews. The Water Control Center monitors the Master Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) terminal and monitors the water system operation, under the direction of the Water System Manager. Major City emergencies are managed by the City Emergency Operations Committee (EOC) and the Kent Fire Department, and coordinated with the Water Department and other utilities through the Public Works DOC. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-5 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT CROSS-CONNECTION CONTROL PERSONNEL The City’s Cross-Connection Control (CCC) program is managed by a designated Cross Connection Control Inspector* (CCS-1) under the supervision of the Water System Manager. All Water Department personnel classified as Maintenance Worker 3 and above are required to be CCS-1 certified to assist with water system protection and implementation of the program. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Improvements are jointly planned, budgeted, and prioritized by personnel of the Engineering and Operations divisions of the Public Works Department. Once developed, the annual budget is submitted to the Public Works Department for review and approval, and to the Mayor and City Council for adoption. Overall implementation is the responsibility of the Public Works Director or designee, who assigns specific elements thereof to the City Engineer or Operations Manager. BUDGET FORMULATION Field crews and Field Supervisors prepare and submit operating budget and capital budget requests to the Water System Manager, who prioritizes requests and adds capital improvements, reviews them with the Public Works Operations Manager, and submits them to the Public Works Director for review and approval. Final approval is given by the City Operations Manager, Mayor, and City Council. The Water Department rate structure and debt service is managed by the Public Works Director and staff, as well as the City Finance Department. RESPONSE TO COMPLAINTS Complaints are recorded by office staff and routed to the Water System Manager or Field Supervisors for follow up or crew dispatch in a timely manner. Follow-up results are reviewed by the Water System Manager and recorded by office staff. An Infrastructure Management System Customer Service module is used to provide better complaint tracking and more effective response. PUBLIC PRESS CONTACT All press-related releases related to the Water System are generally routed to the Water System Manager, and reviewed with the Public Works Operations Manager and the Public Works Director. BILLING Water customers’ billing and meter reading is managed by the Utility Billing division of the Finance Department. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT PERSONNEL CERTIFICATIONS DOH requires State certifications for individuals responsible for certain aspects of water system management and operation. The City associates State certifications with specific job classifications as follows: • Water System Management – Water Distribution Manager 4 • Water Treatment Plant Supervision – WTPO-2 • Water Treatment Plant Operation – WTPO-1 • Cross-Connection Control Program – CCS-1 The City has on staff the personnel to meet or exceed those requirements and requires DOH certification of all tenured water operations and maintenance personnel. This is achieved by sponsoring personnel attendance at appropriate safety and technical seminars to encourage advancements and compliance with the professional growth required. Table 8-1 provides a listing of current certifications held by City staff members, and those required by DOH for this water system as indicated by an asterisk (*). Table 8-1 Employee Certification Certification Number of Certified Personnel BAT - Backflow Assembly Tester 1 *CCS 1 - Cross-Connection Specialist 1 24 WDMIT - Water Distribution Manager in Training 0 WDM1 - Water Distribution Manager 1 6 WDM2 - Water Distribution Manager 2 13 WDM3 - Water Distribution Manager 3 5 *WDM4 - Water Distribution Manager 4 1 WDS - Water Distribution Specialist 10 WTPOIT - Water Treatment Plant Operator in Training 4 *WTPO1 - Water Treatment Plant Operator 1 5 *WTPO2 - Water Treatment Plant Operator 2 2 WTPO3 - Water Treatment Plant Operator 3 2 WTPO4 - Water Treatment Plant Operator 4 1 SAFETY PROCEDURES Employees of the City’s Water Department adhere to all relevant Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)/Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) safety requirements, and follow procedures that meet or exceed those requirements (i.e., lock out/tag CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-7 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT out for pump station repairs and maintenance). Regular training of employees during safety meetings and tailgate meetings ensures that all employees are reminded of current safety policies and procedures. Areas of potential work place hazards that have been identified by Water Department personnel are as follows: • Confined space hazards – primarily atmospheric or oxygen deficiency • Electrical, mechanical, and energy hazards • Hazardous chemicals and materials • Asbestos pipe hazards • Fall hazards • Excavation hazards • Equipment operation hazards The City has compiled programs to ensure the safety of its employees and citizens in each of the areas above. The employees are thoroughly trained in each of the safety programs as they apply to their job duties, and there are daily safety tailgate meetings with crews held by Field Supervisors to review specific safety procedures for the scheduled tasks and assignments. The department crews meet together monthly for mandatory safety training organized and coordinated by the Safety Committee, made up of representatives from each department. The committee also regularly inspects facilities and maintenance practices, as well as investigating incidents and accidents, to aggressively reduce workplace accidents and injuries of employees. First aid training is required for all employees, and first aid equipment (ten unit packs) are maintained in all vehicles and at major facilities. Emergency services (911) is called whenever needed for medical aid. ROUTINE SYSTEM OPERATION The following presents a schedule of inspection and maintenance for major water system components within the City’s water system. Detailed information regarding specific facilities and equipment is not presented herein and is contained in Operation and Maintenance manuals. WELLS AND SPRINGS Well and spring source facilities are exercised regularly to maintain reliability when not in use. Disinfection and bacteriological analyses are performed after long periods of inactivity or following rehabilitation work on the source facilities. When online, local programmable logic controller (PLC) or remote (SCADA) controls start and stop the pumps as needed based on reservoir levels or system pressure. PUMP STATIONS Pumps alternate on and off regularly, usually every 24 hours, to provide exercise and maintain maximum reliability. Local controls (or remote SCADA control) start and stop the pumps as needed based on system pressures or reservoir levels. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT RESERVOIRS Reservoirs are monitored regularly for chlorine residuals, daily or weekly, to ensure frequent water turnover and avoid stagnation. Pump start and stop setpoints are set to ensure frequent water level cycling. Reservoirs that are drained for maintenance or repairs are cleaned, disinfected, and sampled for bacteriological or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) before being returned to service, following American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standards. METER READING Source, pump station, and reservoir meters are read each weekday on a regular schedule when online. The Water Department plans to implement remote totalizer reading with its new SCADA system in the near future, which will allow for system-wide totals to be obtained at a preset time, even on weekends and holidays. This will allow for better recordkeeping of production and demand, and enhance daily demand planning during peak periods. SYSTEM PERFORMANCE The overall performance of the water system is monitored by two critical parameters: • Water Quality Reliability – Operations and maintenance programs and priorities are aligned to achieve optimum water quality that meets or exceeds DOH requirements throughout the water system. Water quality performance is measured by the history of Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) violations, as well as the number, frequency, and type of complaints from customers regarding water quality. Performance also is measured by the daily source/system water quality parameters being above or below the average recorded. The City’s water system has an excellent record of water quality over the last 6 years; and • Water Production and Storage – Operations and maintenance programs and priorities are aligned to achieve a reliable water supply measured in quantity stored to meet both demands and system pressures. The City’s system has a good history of maintaining reservoir levels at or above 80 percent at all times and water system pressures meeting the system design, even during peak summer demands and fire flow conditions/testing. Performance is measured by monitoring and recording reservoir levels and system pressures, as well as tracking customer complaints for low pressure. Customers are advised of the system pressure available and what is causing the volume restrictions. Facility or system component performance is generally reflected in one of the two areas identified above. Individual equipment or appurtenance performance is monitored for reliability throughout its life cycle. Those which do not meet the criteria are scheduled/budgeted for replacement. The Hansen IMS system will assist in tracking performance and maintenance history in the future, as well as maintenance and repair costs. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-9 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE The City maintains a strong preventative maintenance program to maximize the useful life of all water system facilities and avoid emergency conditions wherever possible by performing system maintenance on a regularly scheduled and timely manner. A key component of the City’s preventative maintenance and asset management is the Hansen IMS (Infrastructure Management System). The City invested in this program to track maintenance work on its infrastructure and create a database that includes maintenance information on water system facilities such as valves, hydrants, water mains, water meters and services, pump stations, sources/wells, treatment facilities, and storage tanks/reservoirs. Another key change to water system operation and maintenance in recent years is the advancement of the City’s GIS. The City’s in-house GIS staff and Water Department personnel have worked to create a comprehensive water system map in GIS linked to the Hansen technical maintenance data for a specific location or facility. When the Hansen system generates a work order, it also has the capability (as soon as it is linked to GIS) to print a map of where the asset identified on the work order is located. This allows for City-wide integration of data and assists with a variety of inter-department functions such as scheduling capital improvements projects, budgeting, and coordinating water, sewer, street, and storm water infrastructure repairs and projects through the common GIS database. Another key benefit of the Hansen software in conjunction with the City-wide GIS system is that it provides a mechanism for developing an inventory of all water system assets. Using the inventory of assets and historical maintenance and repair data, a “self-thinking” database can be established to prompt staff when preventative maintenance work needs to be performed. Full implementation of the program will allow the City to: • Inventory/track all assets by ID number and physical address; • Track labor, material, and associated costs; • Schedule work by individual asset or group assets; • Generate work orders for scheduled and unscheduled preventative maintenance; • Forecast repairs and replacement part needs; and • Project budgetary information. FIRE HYDRANTS There are approximately 2,900 hydrants within the water system that are maintained by the Water Department. Information such as location, size, type, feeder information, manufacturer, and number of turns for the foot valve are examples of the information that is collected for the database. Presently, City Water personnel have the responsibility for an ongoing program of inspecting and flushing hydrants. The Water Department hires one or more Maintenance Assistants who have a goal to inspect and operate approximately one-half of the fire hydrants annually and notify the Water Distribution Supervisor of any items requiring maintenance. With the addition of the CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Hansen system, the Water Department does not anticipate changing the current inspection procedures; however, it will provide the database for labor, material, and historical data. METERS 3 INCHES AND LARGER Large meters, sized 3 inches and 4 inches, currently undergo bi-annual testing, and all meters sized 6 inches to 10 inches are tested annually. Some large meters require additional personnel to enter the confined space and provide support during the testing. The work order generated by the Hansen system will prompt crews in advance if the meter is located within a confined space, as well as the history of repairs and accuracy profile of each meter. The City has been upgrading many of the large meters and vaults for the past 10 years, and the accuracy, reliability, and safety has been significantly improved. WATER MAINS/DEAD-END MAINS There are approximately 595 dead-end mains within the distribution system. Dead-end mains are flushed on a yearly basis or more frequently as required. Each dead-end main has been assigned a unique identifier within the Hansen system for better tracking of historical data. Each time the main is flushed, it is recorded in the database. After a few years (or sooner for mains that require more frequent flushing), the database will generate work orders for main flushing. Other distribution mains are flushed or cleaned on an as-needed basis. PUMP STATIONS All water sources and pump stations are visited on a daily basis while in operation. Well and pump data is recorded and monitored to identify any irregularities in system operation. Pumps and pump station equipment receive regular service on an hours-in-operation or lapsed time basis. STORAGE RESERVOIRS Daily visits to the storage reservoirs are made to check security and overall site conditions. The reservoirs are taken out of service approximately every 3 to 5 years for cleaning and are painted every 10 to 15 years or on an as-needed basis. PRESSURE REDUCING VALVES City-owned distribution system pressure reducing valves are inspected monthly, receive complete maintenance on an annual basis, and are rebuilt every 5 years. Maintenance for privately owned pressure reducing valves is the responsibility of the customer. TELEMETRY The telemetry system employs primarily electronic components that require little maintenance, other than calibration checks and battery replacement. The telemetry system is inspected annually. This includes inspecting all telemetry recording instruments and mechanical flow meters. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-11 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT In addition, more frequent checks are made to monitor facilities having temporary problems. Emergency response equipment and spare parts inventory also are checked periodically. WATERSHED INSPECTION To assist in maintaining the integrity of the City’s water supply sources, the City has a watershed inspection and wellhead protection area (WHPA) program. Under this WHPA, the watershed areas are inspected on a regular basis for any activity that may affect the water quality at the City’s facilities. Should a potential issue appear, the City would proceed with the necessary testing and studies to verify or discount the concerns. Should a concern be validated, the City would take whatever steps necessary to protect the integrity of its sources, which could include both physical improvements at its sources and legal action against the polluter. The City has obtained baseline sampling results from multiple sites within its most susceptible watershed and WHPA’s 1 year time of travel, for high and low aquifer level periods, as phase one of its WHPA program. The City also has advised King County of areas under County jurisdiction that fall within the watershed area and requested consideration and cooperation of protection of the watershed in County land use planning and actual developments. Further protection of the sources of supply is achieved by regular, contracted daily security patrol services during evening and night time hours at these sources. PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE A summary of the City’s water system preventative maintenance schedule is described in Table 8-2. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 8-2 Preventative Maintenance Schedule Task Sources of Supply DailyWeeklyMonthlySemi-AnnualAnnualComments Inspect online buildings and sites, pumps, and chemical feed equipment, record flow and hour meter readings and electronic well levels, make adjustments, add chemicals, and sample and record water quality information. X Exercise generators.X Inspect all facilities, manually sound and record pumping and monitoring well levels. Clean buildings and piping. X Inspect and exercise/test all equipment, perform scheduled PM, lubricate, and adjust equipment as necessary per manufacturers recommendations, record pump and motor voltage, amperage, and efficiency values. X Inspect and test motor/pump bearings - ultrasound.X Inspect and test electrical panels and motor connections - infrared.X Inspect watersheds and surrounding areas - WHPA.X Monitoring well levels recorded.X More thorough summer/winter Grounds maintenance, mowing, and weeding.X Spring/Summer Tree pruning and clearing fence lines.X Spring/Fall Repaint buildings and piping.1-5 years Inspect/clean/test pump control valves.X Rebuild pump control and flow control valves - replace all rubber parts. Contractor (4 years) Calibrate flow meters, level, and pressure transmitters, rebuild as necessary.X Interval CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-13 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 8-2 Preventative Maintenance Schedule (Continued) Pump Stations DailyWeeklyMonthlySemi-AnnualAnnualComments Inspect online buildings and sites, pumps, and equipment. Record flow/hour meter and pressure readings, check Cl2 and pH readings. X Exercise generator(s) and diesel pump(s).X Inspect all facilities, clean buildings and piping.X Inspect and exercise/test all equipment, perform scheduled PM, lubricate, and adjust equipment as necessary per manufacturers recommendations, record pump and motor voltage, amperage, and efficiency values. X Inspect and test motor/pump bearings - ultrasound.X Inspect and test electrical panels and motor connections - infrared.X Inspect/clean/test pump control valves.X Rebuild pump control valves - replace all rubber parts. Contractor (4 years) Calibrate flow meters and pressure transmitters - rebuild as necessary.X Repaint buildings and piping.1-5 years Grounds maintenance, mowing, and weeding.X Tree pruning and clearing fence lines.X Spring/Fall Pressure Reducing Valves Stations and Vaults DailyWeeklyMonthlySemi-AnnualAnnualComments Inspect and clean valve stations and vaults. Record pressures and check operation.X Inspect, clean, adjust, and test pressure reducing valves.X Rebuild control valves - replace all rubber parts.Contractor (4 years) CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 8-2 Preventative Maintenance Schedule (Continued) SCADA System DailyWeeklyMonthlySemi-AnnualAnnualComments Remote units (RTU) - Inspect and test batteries, calibration, and radio transmission.X Base station and master SCADA - test auxiliary power.X Clean and test/verify function of all discrete, analog, and control points from remote sites.X Distribution System DailyWeeklyMonthlySemi-AnnualAnnualComments Collect representative samples Cl2, NaE, and pH.X Reservoir/remote sites Cl2, NaE, pH, and bacteriological.X X X DOH requirement - 70 per month for bacteriological Flush all dead-end mains.X More frequently when needed Air/vacuum release valves - inspect, clean, and test.As needed Transmission mains (inspect and clear easements).X As needed Distribution mains - leak detect program.When leakage is above standard Fire hydrants/hydrant valves - inspect, test, operate, and record pressures.X As needed or every 2 years Distribution valves - exercise and clean out valve box.As needed Test 3-inch and larger meters.X Annual (6" and up) Bi-annual (3" and 4") Replace 2-inch and smaller meters.15 to 20 years or as needed Read commercial meters.X Read residential meters.Bi-monthly Distribution main cleaning - ongoing.10 to 20 years or as needed Cross-connection/backflow devices tested by Certified BAT.x Documentation provided to City CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-15 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT EQUIPMENT INVENTORY The City maintains a full array of heavy equipment, vehicles, and supplies to maintain regular system operations, construct small system extensions and replacements, and respond to emergency conditions. Identification of routine supplies and emergency response equipment and materials has been coordinated with the City’s emergency response and hazard mitigation plans, a complete vulnerability assessment, and the needs of various departments within the City. An ongoing materials list and inventory is maintained by the Water Department for in-house needs and to assist with emergency response if requested by other purveyors in the area. CHEMICAL INVENTORY Operation and maintenance of a public water system requires use of various chemicals for water treatment and disinfection of facilities. Table 8-3 identifies the typical types of chemicals stored and their purpose. Chemical specifications are identified in the City’s Warehouse/Purchasing agents files, the material safety data sheet (MSDS) records, and posted onsite wherever chemical agents and compounds are used for water treatment. Table 8-3 Chemical Inventory Chemical Purpose/Use Chlorine (Liquid/Gas)Disinfection of Water Supply Sodium Fluoride Fluoridation of Water Supply Sodium Hypochlorite (12.5%)Disinfection of Water Supply Sodium Hydroxide (25%)pH Adjustment (Corrosion Control) Potassium Permanganate (Dry)Iron and Manganese Removal Potassium Permanganate (4% Solution)Iron and Manganese Removal WATER QUALITY MONITORING PROGRAM Each of the City's water supply sources currently is classified as groundwater. The City is conducting an extensive WHPA program to serve as an early detection of possible aquifer contamination. The program involves monitoring from selected wells within the 1 year, 5 year, and 10 year zones of influence for the sources most susceptible to contamination: Clark Springs; Kent Springs; and Armstrong Springs. The current quality of the City's water supply is excellent, with only minor secondary contaminant concerns. Secondary contaminants are classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as aesthetic concerns and not a threat to human health. These contaminants are primarily iron and manganese, which are treated by aeration and dilution for the Seven Oaks (Soos Creek) and Garrison well sites, and oxidation followed by filtration for the 208th and 212th well sites. The City chlorinates its water supply for public health protection from bacteriological pathogens. The City also fluoridates the water supply for dental health benefits for consumers. The City's water supply also is moderately hard, with a relatively low pH; CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT consequently, it is slightly corrosive to plumbing fixtures. In June 2012, the City completed and put online a corrosion control facility at Guiberson Reservoir to adjust the pH of Kent Springs water and Kent Springs water when blending with Tacoma water to make it less corrosive. The 212th Treatment Plant adjusts the pH of its product water to a pH of 8.2 whenever it is operating. A summary of the City’s water treatment is shown in Table 8-4. As discussed in Chapter 6, the City maintains compliance with the regulations set forth by the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 141 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; and DOH Drinking Water Regulations for Group A, Public Water Systems, Chapter 246-290 WAC. Table 8-4 Water Treatment Source Type of Treatment Comments Clark Springs Chlorination, fluoridation, and pH adjustment None Kent Springs Chlorination, fluoridation, and pH adjustment None East Hill Well Chlorination, fluoridation, and pH adjustment None Seven Oaks (Soos Creek Well)Chlorination, fluoridation Blended with Clark Springs or Kent Springs Armstrong Springs Wells #1 and #2 Chlorination, fluoridation Blended with Clark Springs or Kent Springs Garrison Well Chlorination, fluoridation Blended with treated water at 6 MG #2 Reservoir O'Brien Well Chlorination, fluoridation None 208th Well and 212th Wells #1, #2, and #3 Chlorination, fluoridation, filtration, and pH adjustment 208th and 212th Wells treated together at the 212th Street Treatment Plant Table 8-5 includes a partial list of analytical laboratories used by the City for routine and specific analysis of drinking water samples. These laboratories are EPA and DOH certified for compliance with Department of Health regulations. The City’s current water quality monitoring program is included in Appendix I. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-17 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 8-5 Water Quality Analytical Laboratories (State of Washington Approved) Laboratory Phone Number Address Analysis Performed Water Management Labs Inc.(253) 531-3121 1515 80th Street E Tacoma, WA 98404 Bacteriological, IOC, VOC, SOC, THM, general chemistry, and other water quality analysis Edge Analytical Laboratories (800) 755-9295 1620 S Walnut Street Burlington, WA 98233 Bacteriological, IOC, VOC, SOC, THM, general chemistry, and other water quality analysis UCMR II Washington DOH Public Health Laboratories (206) 418-5400 1610 NE 150th Street Shoreline, WA 98155 Maximum total Trihalomethane potential (MTTPs), radionuclides, general organic chemistry AmTest Laboratories (425) 885-1664 13600 NE 126th Place, Suite C Kirkland, WA 98034 Bacteriological, IOC, VOC, SOC, THM, general chemistry, and other water quality analysis PUBLIC NOTIFICATION In accordance with the requirements of the EPA, the City prepares an annual water quality report sometimes referred to as a Consumer Confidence Report. A copy of this report is included in Appendix K. In the event of an issue with the water supply, the City has established procedures for various levels of emergency, including suspected water quality issues, known contaminants identified in the water system, boil water notifications, and water supply interruption or shortage. The exact procedures and language identified for each potential water quality or quantity emergency is included in the City’s Coliform Monitoring Plan, Cross-Connection Control Program, Water Shortage Response Plan, or Emergency Response Plan, as appropriate. In general, the City is fully prepared for the following public notification measures. Please note that these general methods of notification are intended only as a summary of complete procedures and language identified in the aforementioned plans and procedures. • Newspaper Notices • Direct Mail Notice or Hand Delivery to all Consumers or Customers in a Specific Area of the System • Posted Notice • Notice to Radio and Television Stations • Notices to New Billing Units or New Hookups • City of Kent social media sites EMERGENCY RESPONSE All water supply systems are subject to damage and interruption from unusual emergency events. The City’s Water Department has participated in City-wide emergency response planning and has a detailed program for responding to a variety of emergency conditions. The details of that CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT emergency response program are classified confidential for the protection of the system, health and safety of system customers, and privacy of water system personnel. The following provides a general overview of key activities that have been evaluated and/or are in place. WATER SYSTEM PERSONNEL EMERGENCY CALL-UP LIST The City maintains information that identifies, in order (based on DOH certification level and experience), water system personnel responsible for making decisions in specific emergency situations. Job titles and phone numbers (work and home) are included. The Kent Police Department (phone 253-856-5800) has a current list of all phone numbers on file and available 24 hours a day, as well as procedures for emergency callout of the proper personnel. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURES A Boil Water Notice may be approved or distributed by the City. In all cases the Public Works Director, City Operations Manager, and/or the Mayor are to be notified of any action taken as soon as possible. SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS Kennedy Jenks completed a seismic vulnerability assessment of the City’s water system in 2017. The objectives of the study were to determine the potential for damage, disruption of services, and injury or loss of life (life-safety) due to an earthquake; and to develop preliminary mitigation recommendations and estimated construction costs. The City has implemented the recommendations of the vulnerability analysis in its budgeting and Capital Improvement Program (CIP) (Chapter 9). Water system component vulnerability was assessed in the following areas: major fire; earthquake; chlorine gas; mechanical failure; bomb; power; employee accident/illness; sub-zero weather; flooding; and windstorm. The study did not identify any system components as “very vulnerable.” However, the analysis did put forth recommendations for corrective action on some system components. While key recommendations for security improvements have been accomplished, this is considered an ongoing expense to the City, with improvements accomplished as technology allows and system components require. Other system vulnerability upgrades have been identified in consultant reports and summarized in the CIP contained in Chapter 9. The identification and addition of all system improvements, however, will increase the reliability of the water system in the event of an emergency and extend the useful life of the system. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-19 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Table 8-6 Preparation Common to All Emergencies Advise personnel to arrange for safety of families in advance. Prepare emergency schedule and brief personnel. Put all personnel on emergency status. Strategically locate and station crews. Check vehicles, auxiliary electrical power, and pumping units. A. Sufficient fuel. B. Operation of emergency power/battery operated lights. C. Operation of vehicles. Check emergency communication equipment for readiness. Maintain emergency rations, water, clothing, and bedding at the maintenance shops sufficient for 72 hours. Secure equipment and supplies in exposed areas; secure buildings; install storm shutters, if available and appropriate. Review possible repair materials for local purchase of items on short notice in an emergency. Arrange with local suppliers and nearby utilities for access to stored chemicals, tools, repair parts, etc., which may be required immediately after the disaster. Determine the need to relocate certain materials to outlying sites. Personnel Materials Facilities CONDITIONS OF SERVICE Throughout the year, three distinctive conditions of service (green, yellow, or red) can exist. The conditions are explained below. The Water System Manager is responsible for making all changes in the condition or service, with the approval of the Public Works Director. 1. Condition Green – Normal water use. Notification of Water Department Control Center is required for all unusual or excessive water/hydrant use. 2. Condition Yellow – Caution is necessary with all water/hydrant use. All inspections/water main flushing and/or hydrant flows must be cleared through the Water Department Control Center in advance. 3. Condition Red – • Level #1 – No hydrant use. No inspection water flows. Contact Water Department Control Center on all emergency hydrant use or water flows. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • Level #2 – Same as Level #1 except public irrigation is authorized on alternate days based on street address (odd/even), ONLY. • Level #3 – Same as Level #1 except that public irrigation is prohibited. PUBLIC NOTIFICATIONS Many of the City’s water quality monitoring and emergency response plans call for notification of the public of emergency conditions and of required demand curtailment measures. Sample announcements are presented here in increasing order of severity. The City should contact newspapers and several local radio and television stations, which broadcast in the service area, to make prior arrangements concerning emergency announcements. Sample I For Immediate Release: The City of Kent is experiencing unusually high water demand and is having difficulty maintaining adequate reservoir reserves. Residents of the City are requested to reduce water consumption and to avoid wasting water wherever possible. It will be particularly helpful if homeowners will make every effort to reduce lawn irrigation. The problem is expected to be temporary in nature, and a public announcement will be made when normal water consumption can be resumed. Sample II For Immediate Release: The City of Kent is experiencing a major loss of its water production capacity. The City’s customers are directed to stop all irrigation and to make every effort to conserve potable water. Failure to do so may result in the application of fines of up to $50/day, according to City ordinance #2227. The City is doing everything possible to correct the situation, and will make a public announcement as soon as the problem has been rectified. Sample III For Immediate Release: This is a Community Emergency Announcement. The City of Kent has experienced a major loss of its water production capacity, and, therefore, is unable to maintain normal water deliveries. It is mandatory that all irrigation, industrial, and commercial use be discontinued. Water must be conserved for sanitary and potable use only. Your cooperation is urgently requested. Failure to eliminate unessential uses of water may result in the application of fines of up to $50/day, according to City ordinance #2227. The City is doing everything possible to restore the water system to normal operations. You will be notified of any change in the situation. Note: repeat the above message. Sample IV For immediate Release: The City of Kent has experienced a total loss of its water production capacity; as a result, the water mains have been shut off and normal water deliveries have been discontinued. The City CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-21 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT has made arrangements to deliver water by tanker truck or bottled water to residential areas for potable and sanitary uses only. When picking up water at the tank truck locations, please bring your own clean containers. The City is doing everything possible to resume normal water service and will notify you as soon as water service has been restored. State law, WAC 248-54-750, Reporting and Public Notification, clearly outlines the City’s responsibilities for both oral and written communication with water users in situations that may be caused by emergencies. All staff with authority for public announcements should be familiar with these regulations. In addition to public announcements, communication with emergency services is vital. CUSTOMER COMPLAINT RESPONSE PROGRAM The City has adopted the following policy and procedures for taking and responding to complaints/inquiries. To contact the Water Department, citizens contact the Public Works Operations Department through the public number, which is (253) 856-5600. The phone is operated by City employees Monday through Friday (except holidays) between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. During non-working hours, the phones are answered by a voice message system. In the case of emergencies during non-working hours, the calls are forwarded to the City Police Department who contacts Water Department employees on a callback list, the employees on standby, or the Water System Manager. During standard working hours, the individual receiving the call shall record all of the pertinent information (i.e., name, address, location of the problem, date, phone number, and the nature of the call) on a complaint/inquiry form in the WebQA System for assignment and tracking. Each form has a unique identifying number to assist in tracking. Once all the pertinent information is recorded, a copy of the form is given to the corresponding supervisor or System Manager. Field Supervisors/System Managers are responsible for contacting the citizen as soon as possible within a 24 hour period. After the citizen has been contacted and the situation assessed, the response given to the citizen is recorded in the WebQA database. COMPLAINT RESPONSE Following are the established procedures for responding to the most common complaints/inquiries. High Chlorine – Contact customer by phone, explain chlorination practices and monitoring, follow up with visit to customer location (if necessary) and perform field analysis. Explain results to customer and give advice on procedures to lessen chlorine tastes and odors if normal levels have become objectionable to the customer. Stains on Plumbing Fixtures – Contact customer by phone, determine type of stain (i.e., result of type of plumbing), explain water quality, and need to eliminate leakage that is leaving stain. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Request for Water Quality Results – Contact customer by phone to determine type of result they are looking for or reason for needing the information. Follow up with mail, email, or fax of results needed by customer. Inquiry on Fluoride – Contact customer by phone. Generally, customer inquiry is “do we fluoridate the water?” Check customer address to verify City of Kent customer, and inform them of fluoride concentration. Bad Tasting/Smelling Water – Contact customer by phone to determine type of smell or taste causing concern. Set up site visit to check water quality; and check chlorine residuals to determine quality of water. Meet with customer to review concerns, ways to eliminate or lessen concerns (i.e., flushing, refrigeration), and dispatch distribution crews for main flushing if necessary. “Ill Because of Water” – Contact customer by phone and get information on the reason for this concern and schedule an appointment for meeting with the customer. Meet with customer and take chlorine residual to determine possibility of high chlorine demand; determine necessity of bacteriological sampling and sample if necessary with sample going to certified laboratory for analysis. Contact customer with results and inform them of physician responsibility to report suspected waterborne illness to local Health Department and the fact that the Health Department is not reporting a problem; advise customer to follow up with a doctor if necessary. If concern is related to other causes, such as minerals or chlorine, City staff inform the customer of water quality and methods for lessening exposure to these areas. If customer is still concerned, suggestion may be made to drink bottled water. Inquiry of Lead Content – Inform customer of the absence of lead in the City water supply, but explain the potential for lead in plumbing piping and fixtures. Explain lead/copper monitoring program, City water quality characteristics, corrosion control facilities, and ways to eliminate exposure (i.e., flushing standing water, using cold water for cooking and drinking); provide customers with lead information packets. Specks of Material in Water – Call customer and determine type of specks. Schedule an appointment with customer for determination of material. If it is related to the customers plumbing, suggest ways to clear. If related to distribution system, dispatch distribution crew for main flushing and determine cause. Rusty Water – Call customer and determine if problem is internal to building or if it is from distribution system. If internal, suggest ways to clear problem. If external, dispatch distribution crew for main flushing and determine cause (i.e., dead-end main, contractor activity, or water system surges). PROCEDURES FOR RECORD REPORTING TO DOH For coliform monitoring and chemical analysis of water for compliance issues, the contracted certified laboratory sends a copy of the results to the City and a copy of the results directly to DOH. The City maintains water quality analysis results and provides these results to DOH upon request. For special programs such as lead/copper rule or synthetic organic susceptibility, the City mails results directly to DOH Drinking Water offices in Olympia. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) 8-23 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Reporting to the Department of Health For coliform monitoring, any instance of a positive coliform present analysis requires the City to follow the procedures outlined in the Coliform Monitoring Plan. RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING DOH has enacted regulations for recordkeeping and reporting that may be found in WAC 246-290-480. The regulations identify recordkeeping and reporting procedures for operations and water quality testing. Records shall be kept for chlorine residual and other information as specified by DOH. DOH requires retention of critical records dealing with facilities and water quality issues as summarized below. • Bacteriological analysis results: 5 years. • Chemical analysis results: for as long as the system is in operation. • Daily source meter readings: 10 years. • Other records of operation and analyses as may be required by DOH: 3 years. • Documentation of actions to correct violations of primary drinking water standards: 3 years after last corrective action. • Records of sanitary surveys: 10 years. • Project reports, construction documents and drawings, inspection reports, and approvals: life of the facility. • Construction completion reports: life of the facility. CHAPTER 8 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 8-24 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH8.DOC (9/30/2019 1:28 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 8-7 Record Keeping and Reporting Type of Record Records Room Supervisor Office Electronic Length of Retention Customer Complaints X X X Permanent DOH Water Facilities Inventory (WFI)X X Permanent Construction Completion Reports X X X Permanent Ground Water Under Direct Surface Influence (GWUI)X X X Permanent Wellhead Protection Plan Monitoring (WHPP)X X Permanent Source Production X X X Permanent Water Quality Analysis X X X Permanent Coliform Monitoring X X X Permanent Fluoride/Chlorine X X X Permanent Inorganics (IOCs)X X X Permanent Volatile Organics (VOCs)X X X Permanent Synthetic Organics (SOCs)X X Permanent Trihalomethanes (THMs)X X X Permanent Radionuclides X X Permanent Lead/Copper Rule (LCR) Monitoring X X Permanent Water Department Time Books/Journals/Log Books X X Permanent Storage Location The most recent sanitary survey of the City’s water system by DOH was conducted in December 2016, and no major deficiencies were found. DOH found that the City’s water system is in good sanitary condition, and that the water system is being operated and managed in a diligent manner. DOH also determined that the City has a functional operations and maintenance group with routine tasks documented and followed, has added additional security measures, is improving its telemetry system, offers reliability with the capability to move flow between zones and utilize different sources, and has auxiliary power available. The City continues to stay in compliance with its water quality sampling requirements. It was very evident to DOH that City staff take their responsibilities seriously and are dedicated toward delivering safe and reliable drinking water to all customers. Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-1 9 | WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCTION This chapter presents proposed improvements to the City of Kent’s (City) water system that are necessary to resolve existing system deficiencies and accommodate the projected growth of water customers. The water system improvements were identified from an evaluation of the results of the water system analyses presented in Chapter 7. The water system improvements were sized to meet both the existing and future demand conditions of the system. A Capital Improvement Program (CIP) number has been assigned to each improvement identified by the City. Numbers assigned to the improvements start at the west end of the system and generally increase incrementally to the east, as shown in Figures 9-1 through 9-7, which are plan views of the improvements. A brief description of the extents shown in these figures is as follows. • Figure 9-1: System-Wide • Figure 9-2: West Hill • Figure 9-3: 240 Zone – West • Figure 9-4: 240 Zone – Downtown • Figure 9-5: 240 Zone – North • Figure 9-6: East Hill – North • Figure 9-7: East Hill – South The improvements also are illustrated in the hydraulic profile of the future water system (Figure 9-8). The improvements are organized and presented in this chapter according to the following categories. • Recent Water System Improvements • Water Main Improvements • Pressure Zone Improvements • Facility Improvements • Miscellaneous Improvements The remainder of this chapter presents a brief description of each group of improvements, the criteria for prioritization, the basis for the cost estimates, and the schedule for implementation. DESCRIPTION OF IMPROVEMENTS This section provides a general description of each group of improvements and an overview of the deficiencies they will resolve. Most of the improvements are necessary to resolve existing system deficiencies. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) RECENT WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS The water system has undergone several changes since 2011, when the City last updated its Water System Plan (WSP). Table 9-1 lists the major water system CIP projects that have been completed since 2011. Table 9-1 Major Improvements Completed Since 2011 WSP Project Description Year Completed 640 Tank Construction 2011 Guiberson Corrosion Control Facility 2011 Pump Station #6 Emergency Generator Transfer Switch Installation 2011 Clark Springs Surge Tank Electrical Upgrade 2012 Pump Station #5 Control Valve Auma Replacements 2012 Pump Station #7 Mag Meter Replacement 2012 Pump Station #7 Generator Set Installation 2012 Cambridge Tank Overflow and Drain Improvements 2012 Blue Boy Standpipe Piping and Control Vault Improvements 2012 Armstrong Springs Chlorination Equipment Upgrade 2013 East Hill Well Generator Set Installation 2013 Clark Springs Well #1 MCC Replacement 2015 City of Tacoma Green River Filtration Facility 2015 Kent Springs Gallery Level Sensor and Chlorination Equipment Installation 2015 Pump Station #5 MCC Upgrade and Installation of Soft Starts for Pumps 3 and 4 2015 212th Street Treatment Plant Mag Meter Upgrade and Auma Valve Control Actuator Installation 2016 Armstrong Springs Wells Back-up Generator with MCC Installation 2016 Armstrong Springs Wells Property Purchase for Source Protection 2016 Pump Station #5 Control Vault Upgrades for 125K Tank 2016 6 MG #2 Reservoir Hatch Security Improvements 2016 Guiberson Reservoir Lining, Manifold, and Security Improvements 2016 3.5 MG Tank Drain and Control Vault Installation, and Flow Meter Installation 2016 East Hill Well Redevelopment and Pump and Motor Replacement 2017 3.5 MG Tank Cleaning, Inspection, and PAX Mixer Replacement 2017 Clark Springs Habitat Conservation Measure #6 – Rock Creek Woody Debris 2017 Clark Springs Watershed Property Purchase for Source Protection (Gribble Property)2017 Guiberson Reservoir Exterior Coating 2017 Kent Springs Overflow Box Vault Lid Installation 2017 Kent and Lake Meridian Water District Intertie #3 Vault and Meter Upgrade 2017 Pump Station #8 Generator Hook-Up and Transfer Switch Installation 2017 Reith Road Tank Cleaning and Inspection 2017 485 Individual Customer PRVs Installed for Future 640 Zone Conversion 2018 6 MG #1 Reservoir Exterior Cleaning 2018 640 Tank Interior Cleaning and Inspection 2018 Clark Springs Augmentation Meter Upgraded 2018 Clark Springs Manual Generator Hook-Up Installed for Secondary Emergency Power 2018 Clark Springs Rock Creek Augmentation Pump Rebuilt and Replaced 2018 Clark Springs Wells 1, 2, and 3 Waste Discharge Line Flow Meter Installed 2018 Gribble Property Monitoring Well Drilled for Sampling South of the Landsburg Mine 2018 SCADA Security Study Performed with Department of Homeland Security 2018 640 Zone Conversion Improvements 2011-Ongoing CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-3 WATER MAIN IMPROVEMENTS The following water main improvements were identified from the results of the distribution and transmission system analyses discussed in Chapter 7 to meet the City’s 2019 design criteria. Some of the water main improvements will replace existing distribution water main and are grouped in the “Annual Water Main Replacement Program – High Priority” project (CIP WM1). The individual water main improvement projects within this group are numbered 1 through 55, as shown in Figures 9-9 through 9-15. Medium and low priority projects were not identified with a CIP number, but they are shown in Figures 9-9 through 9-15. Other water main improvements are mostly larger diameter water mains that function more like transmission mains than distribution mains and are identified by the City as individual projects (CIP WM2 through WM13). CIP WM1: Annual Water Main Replacement Program – High Priority Deficiency: Most of the water main improvements shown in Figures 9-9 through 9-15 are required to resolve existing system fire flow deficiencies based on 2019 design criteria for new construction and are caused primarily by undersized water mains. Some of the water main improvements address aging water main materials, such as asbestos cement (AC) and cast iron (CI). Many areas also have known occurrences of water main leaks or breaks. Improvement: Replace existing water main with new water main in accordance with the City’s construction standards. The individual water main improvements grouped under this project are numbered 1, 2, 3, etc., as shown in Figures 9-9 through 9-15. The selection of specific projects will be accomplished annually during the City’s budget development process and guided by the prioritization presented later in this chapter. This provides the City with the flexibility to coordinate these projects with other projects that may occur within the same area. An average allowance of approximately $2,200,000 per year has been established for the annual replacement of water mains. CIP WM2: Veterans Drive and Military Road Transmission Main Deficiency: A single transmission main in Meeker Street crosses the Green River to connect the City’s supply facilities to the City’s West Hill operating area. A secondary transmission main is proposed to be installed to provide a redundant conveyance route to the West Hill operating area. Improvement: The proposed main is recommended to be 16-inch-diameter to meet the future supply needs of the West Hill operating area and for compatibility with the proposed CIP F1: West Hill BPS capacity. The alignment of the proposed main is proposed to be within Veterans Drive, between a future West Hill BPS located immediately east of the Green River and Military Road, and primarily within Military Road, between Veterans Drive and a future West Hill Reservoir located at approximately S 248th Street. It is recommended that this project be designed and constructed in conjunction with CIP F1: West Hill BPS. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) CIP WM3: Reith Road Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing 8-inch-diameter main in Reith Road between 42nd Avenue S and 38th Avenue S is undersized and does not provide sufficient fire flow to the 529 Zone. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 16-inch-diameter main. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CIP WM4: 68th Avenue S Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing main in 68th Avenue S between James Street and S 190th Street is predominantly constructed of concrete and is over 50 years old. The water main has likely reached or is approaching the end of its design life. Additionally, a Seismic Vulnerability Assessment, prepared in 2017 by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, recommends that key transmission main in the City’s 240 Zone be upgraded with the installation of seismically restrained main to prevent service interruptions following a seismic event. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 12- and 16-inch-diameter main. It is recommended that the replacement main be seismically restrained water main. This project location is shown on Figures 9-3, 9-4, and 9-5. CIP WM5: S 212th Street Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing main in S 212th Street between Russell Road and 84th Avenue S is over 50 years old and has likely reached or is approaching the end of its design life. Additionally, a Seismic Vulnerability Assessment, prepared in 2017 by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, recommends that key transmission main in the City’s 240 Zone be upgraded with the installation of seismically restrained main to prevent service interruptions following a seismic event. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 16-inch-diameter main. It is recommended that the replacement main be seismically restrained water main. This project location is shown on Figures 9-3 and 9-5. CIP WM6: 84th Avenue S Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing main in 84th Avenue S between S 228th Street and S 192nd Street is predominantly constructed of concrete and is over 60 years old. The water main has likely reached or is approaching the end of its design life. Additionally, a Seismic Vulnerability Assessment, prepared in 2017 by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, recommends that key transmission main in the City’s 240 Zone be upgraded with the installation of seismically restrained main to prevent service interruptions following a seismic event. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 16-inch-diameter main. It is recommended that the replacement main be seismically restrained water main. This project location is shown on Figure 9-5. CIP WM7: Guiberson Reservoir Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The Guiberson Reservoir has two primary transmission mains to convey water to the 240 Zone. The transmission main that conveys water west from the Guiberson Reservoir is CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-5 located primarily within easements, is difficult to access, and is located on a steep slope that has been the location of a historical landslide (Figure 2-2, Seismic Vulnerability Assessment, Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, 2017). Improvement: Abandon the existing transmission main to the west of the Guiberson Reservoir, between approximately Kennebeck Avenue and Central Avenue S. Replace the existing transmission main to the north of the Guiberson Reservoir with 24-inch-diameter main in Kennebeck Avenue, between Guiberson Street and E Titus Street, and in E Titus Street between Kennebeck Avenue and Central Avenue S. It is recommended that the replacement main be seismically restrained water main. This project location is shown on Figure 9-4. CIP WM8: 78th Avenue S Water Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing 8-inch-diameter main in 78th Avenue S between approximately S 262nd Street and S 277th Street is undersized and does not provide sufficient fire flow to existing customers served by the looped main in this location. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 12-inch-diameter main. This project location is shown on Figure 9-4. CIP WM9: 88th Avenue S Water Main Improvements Deficiency: No water main currently exists in 88th Avenue S between S 218th Street and approximately S 222nd Street. Improvement: Install 12-inch-diameter main in this location. This project location is shown on Figure 9-5. CIP WM10: S 218th Street Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The existing 12-inch-diameter main in S 218th Street between the 6 Million Gallon #2 (6 MG #2) Reservoir located at Garrison Creek Park and 88th Avenue S is undersized and does not provide sufficient fire flow to the 240 Zone. Improvement: Replace the existing main in this location with 18-inch-diameter main. It is recommended that the replacement main be seismically restrained water main. In addition to the transmission main improvement, evaluate the reconfiguration of the S 218th Street pressure reducing valve (PRV) to allow the City to convey water directly to the 240 Zone from the 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main in the event that the 6 MG #2 Reservoir is out of service, or to wheel City of Tacoma water directly into the 240 Zone. This project location is shown on Figure 9-5. CIP WM11: SE 284th Street Water Main Improvements Deficiency: Additional conveyance capacity between the City of Tacoma (Tacoma) Point of Delivery (POD) #3 and the 590 Zone will be necessary following creation of the 640 Zone, which will truncate some existing distribution main in the east side of the existing 590 Zone. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Improvement: Install 12-inch-diameter main in SE 284th Street between 118th Avenue SE and 109th Avenue SE, and in 108th/109th Avenue SE between SE 284th Street and SE 279th Street. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. CIP WM12: 640 Zone BPS #2 Transmission Main Improvements Deficiency: The City is converting the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone to the 640 Zone, which will be supplied by two future BPSs. Transmission from the proposed 640 BPS #2 (CIP F5), proposed to be located at the Tacoma POD #3 site, will be required to connect the proposed BPS with the 640 Zone distribution system. Improvement: Install 18-inch-diameter 640 Zone main in 118th Avenue SE between SE 284th Street and SE 277th Place, in SE 277th Place between 118th Avenue SE and 120th Avenue SE, and in 120th Avenue SE between SE 277th Place and SE 272nd Place. The proposed 18-inch-diameter main in 120th Avenue SE between SE 276th Street and SE 272nd Place is proposed to replace the existing 6- and 8-inch-diameter main in the same location. Replace existing 8-inch-diameter main in SE 272nd Place between 116th Place SE and 102nd Avenue SE with 12-inch-diameter 640 Zone main. Replace existing 4-inch-diameter main in 117th Avenue SE between SE 276th Street and SE 272nd Place with 8-inch-diameter 640 Zone main. Convert approximately 800 linear feet of existing 18-inch-diameter 590 Zone main in SE 288th Street between the Tacoma POD #3 and 118th Avenue SE, and approximately 1,500 linear feet of existing 24-inch-diameter 590 Zone main in 118th Avenue SE between SE 288th Street and SE 284th Street SE to 640 Zone main. Isolate the proposed 590 and 640 Zones near the vicinity of these proposed improvements with zone valves. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. CIP WM13: 590 Zone Transmission Main Downstream of Tacoma POD #3 Deficiency: The City is converting the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone to the 640 Zone, and the existing 18-inch-diameter 590 Zone main in SE 288th Street is proposed to be converted to 640 Zone main as part of CIP WM16. Additional conveyance capacity from Tacoma POD #3 to the 590 Zone will be necessary following the conversion of the existing 590 Zone main. Improvement: Install 12-inch-diameter 590 Zone main within an easement in approximately 120th Avenue SE between Tacoma POD #3 and SE 284th Street. Replace the existing 8-inch-diameter 590 Zone main in SE 284th Street between approximately 120th Avenue SE and 124th Avenue SE with 12-inch-diameter 590 Zone main. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. Future Water Main Extensions and Replacements All new water main extensions and replacements shall be installed in accordance with the City’s Water System Standard Plans, which are included in Appendix G. All new water mains shall be sized by hydraulic analysis to ensure that all pressure, flow, and velocity requirements stated in Chapter 5 are met. In general, new and replacement water mains that will carry fire flow in CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-7 residential areas shall be a minimum of 8 inches in diameter and looped for multi-family and residential developments. New and replacement water mains in commercial, business park, industrial, and school areas shall be a minimum of 12 inches in diameter and looped. PRESSURE ZONE IMPROVEMENTS The following pressure zone improvements will improve the reliability and redundancy to vulnerable locations throughout the water system and will improve various low and high pressure problem areas throughout the water system. A brief description of the existing deficiency and the improvement itself is provided in the following sections. CIP PZ1: Military Road Connection Between 587 and 575 Zones Deficiency: The City’s West Hill operating area includes independent 587 and 575 Zones, each of which are closed pressures zones that are supplied by separate BPSs. During a fire flow or emergency event, the hydraulic grade of these pressure zones is reduced, and the zones are supplied via the 529 Zone. Improvement: A transmission main is proposed to be installed within Military Road to connect the 587 and 575 Zones to improve redundancy and reliability of these zones, and to convert both zones to open zones with the same hydraulic grade (587 feet) following the completion of a future West Hill Reservoir. The proposed main is recommended to be 12 inches in diameter, and to be installed primarily within Military Road, between approximately S 257th Street and S 264th Street, where the transmission main is proposed to extend to the Cambridge Tank and Pump Station #7 site and connect to the existing 575 Zone main on the discharge side of Pump Station #7. Following this improvement, supply to the converted 575 Zone will primarily be from 587 Zone facilities, with Pump Station #7 operating as backup supply. Operational controls for Pump Station #6 and Pump Station #7 should be adjusted accordingly. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CIP PZ2: 640 Zone Conversion Deficiency: The City is converting the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone to the 640 Zone and will require multiple PRV stations to continue to provide a sufficient level of service to the 590 Zone following the pressure zone conversion, closed valves to separate the 590 and 640 Zones, and the installation of individual PRVs for customers that will experience an increase in service pressures for those that exceed 80 pounds per square inch (psi). Improvement A (116th Avenue and SE 272nd Place): Install a PRV station at the westerly SE 272nd Place dead-end, between 116th Avenue SE and 116th Place SE. Install 12-inch-diameter water main between the proposed PRV and the existing 10-inch-diameter 590 Zone main at the intersection of 116th Avenue SE and 114th Avenue SE. A modified version of this improvement was originally identified in a 640 Zone Creation Report, prepared by RH2 Engineering, Inc., (RH2) in July 2008, and was subsequently included in the analyses presented in a 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-8 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Improvement B (SE 270th Street): Install a PRV station in SE 270th Street, immediately east of the intersection with 120th Avenue SE. This improvement was originally identified in a 640 Zone Creation Report, prepared by RH2 in July 2008, and was subsequently included in the analyses presented in a 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. Improvement C (116th Avenue SE): Install a PRV station in 116th Avenue SE at approximately SE 270th Street. This improvement was originally identified in a 640 Zone Creation Report, prepared by RH2 in July 2008, and was subsequently included in the analyses presented in a 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. Improvement D (SE 265th Street): Install a PRV station in SE 265th Street, between 114th Place SE and 115th Place SE. This improvement was originally identified in a 640 Zone Creation Report, prepared by RH2 in July 2008, and was subsequently included in the analyses presented in a 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc. This project location is shown on Figure 9-6. Improvement E (SE 248th Street): Install a PRV station in SE 248th Street just east of the intersection with 110th Avenue SE. This improvement was originally identified in a 640 Zone Creation Report, prepared by RH2 in July 2008, and was subsequently included in the analyses presented in a 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc. This project location is shown on Figure 9-6. Improvement F (Valve Closures): Close existing in-line valves at the following locations, and install and close new in-line valves at the following locations if a valve is not currently installed at these locations. The list of zone valves starts in the south end of the existing 590 Zone and increase to the north. • Between the two 116th Place SE cul-de-sacs. • In SE 276th Street at the intersection with 116th Place SE. • At the intersection of 120th Avenue SE and SE 276th Street. • At the intersection of 120th Avenue SE and SE 272nd Street. • In SE 266th Street, just west of the intersection with 116th Avenue SE. • In the southwest corner of the Aspen Grove Condominium property, along the 8-inch-diameter main that connects 116th Avenue SE and 114th Avenue SE. • In State Route (SR) 516 (Kent Kangley Road) on the east side of the intersection with 114th Avenue SE. • In SE 256th Street between 113th Avenue SE and 114th Avenue SE. • On the north side of SE 256th Street between 111th Avenue SE and 111th Place SE to convert the existing main installed within an easement at this location to a dead-end 640 Zone main. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-9 • At the intersection of SE 252nd Street and 113th Avenue SE. • At the intersection of SE 252nd Street and 111th Avenue SE (close two valves at this location). • In SE 244th Street between 110th Place SE and 111th Avenue SE. • In SE 240th Street at approximately 110th Avenue SE. • At the intersection of 110th Avenue SE and SE 238th Street. • In 108th Avenue SE between SE 236th Place and SE 236th Street. • At the intersection of SE 236th Street and 108th Avenue SE. • In SE 235th Street, just west of the intersection with 109th Avenue SE. • At the intersection of SE 232nd Place and 108th Avenue SE (and activate the existing PRV at this same location). • At the intersection of SE 232nd Street and 106th Place SE. • At approximately 22900 106th Place SE. • At the intersection of 108th Avenue SE and SE 228th Street/108th Avenue SE. Improvement G (Individual PRVs): Install approximately 400 individual PRVs for customers in the proposed 640 Zone that will experience service pressures in excess of 80 psi. FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS The following water system facility improvements were identified from the results of the water system analyses that are discussed in Chapter 7. The improvements are primarily necessary to resolve existing system deficiencies, but also have been sized to accommodate projected growth. CIP F1: West Hill BPS Deficiency: Pump Station #3 is the only non-emergency supply facility for the City’s West Hill operating area, and the suction main for Pump Station #3 is installed on the Meeker Street Bridge, which has been identified as a seismically vulnerable bridge. In the event that the main on the Meeker Street Bridge is out of service, or Pump Station #3 is out of service, the only supply available to the City’s West Hill operating area is via an emergency intertie with the Highline Water District. Improvement: Construct the West Hill BPS on Veterans Drive, east of the Green River. The proposed BPS will have a firm capacity capable of providing at least the projected 20-year maximum day demand (MDD) of the West Hill operating area, calculated to be 847 gallons per minute (gpm) in Chapter 7. This capacity assumes that CIP F2: West Hill Reservoir is completed before, or in conjunction with, the proposed West Hill BPS project. Therefore, the proposed West Hill BPS will normally pump to an open zone and will not be required to provide the fire flow requirement or peak hour demand (PHD) of the West Hill operating area. However, if the City would like to plan for temporary operations or maintenance conditions involving the CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-10 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) proposed West Hill Reservoir being offline, consideration for additional pumping capacity and equipping the proposed pumps with variable frequency drives (VFDs) is recommended to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase of the project. A stationary emergency generator with an automatic transfer switch is recommended to be installed at the West Hill BPS to maintain service in the event of a power outage. The number of pumps, their capacities, and configuration should be determined during the preliminary design phase of the project. For the purposes of this WSP, the West Hill BPS was assumed to consist of two pumps, each capable of providing at least 1,000 gpm to exceed the projected 20-year MDD of the West Hill operating area. It is recommended that this project be designed and constructed in conjunction with CIP WM2: Veterans Drive and Military Road Transmission Main, and that the sizing and configuration of the proposed BPS be determined during design of CIP F2: West Hill Reservoir. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CIP F2: West Hill Reservoir Deficiency: The West Hill operating area currently consists of four pressure zones, three of which are either closed pressure zones (575 and 587 Zones), or an open pressure zone without sufficient storage capacity to meet the regulatory requirements for the zone (529 Zone). In the event that the pump stations supplying these zones are out of service, or if a fire event occurs, the level of service provided to customers in these zones decreases significantly and can be reduced below regulatory and City’s minimum standards. Improvement: Construct a West Hill Reservoir to provide sufficient water storage for the West Hill operating area beyond the 20-year planning period, calculated to be 2.72 million gallons (MG) of usable storage in Chapter 7. To accommodate growth beyond the 20-year planning period presented in this WSP, the City is proposing to construct the West Hill Reservoir with approximately 10 percent additional usable storage volume, resulting in approximately 3.00 MG of usable storage proposed for the West Hill Reservoir. During the preparation of this WSP, the City was evaluating multiple sites for the proposed West Hill Reservoir and considering standpipe and composite tank configurations for the proposed reservoir. For the purposes of this WSP, the future West Hill Reservoir was assumed to be a standpipe located at a currently undeveloped property on the West Hill between 38th Avenue S and Military Road S adjacent to S 248th Street. The existing ground elevation at the future reservoir location is approximately 440 feet, and the minimum water level to provide 20 psi to the highest existing service elevation is approximately 501 feet, resulting in approximately 61 feet of dead storage at the bottom of the proposed reservoir. Chart 9-1 presents a not-to-scale schematic identifying the approximate elevations and volumes of the proposed West Hill Reservoir storage components. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-11 Chart 9-1: Approximate West Hill Reservoir Storage Component Elevations and Volumes 595 585 575 565 555 545 535 525 515 505 495 485 475 465 455 445 435 Elevation (feet) 523 feet: Minimum Water Level to Provide 30 psi to Highest Service Elevation by Gravity 501 feet: Minimum Water Level to Provide 20 psi to Highest Service Elevation by Gravity 544 feet 571 feet 440 feet SA Operational Storage (550,000 gallons) Equalizing Storage (0 gallons) Standby Storage (950,000 gallons) Fire Flow Storage (1,500,000 gallons) Storage Required to Meet Minimum Fire Flow Pressure (2,200,000 gallons) Based on a minimum usable storage volume of 3.00 MG, a minimum usable water level of 501 feet, and a maximum water level of 587 feet (to match the existing 587 Zone hydraulic grade), the resulting standpipe diameter is calculated to be approximately 78 feet. Constructing the proposed West Hill Reservoir with a maximum water level of 587 feet allows the existing 587 Zone customers to receive the same normal service pressures that are provided currently. However, the existing 587 Zone, and the existing 575 Zone that is proposed to be combined with the 587 Zone, provide pressures to existing customers that is approximately 10 to 20 psi higher than the minimum standards required by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and the City’s design criteria. Water quality evaluations are recommended to take place during the predesign phase of the project to estimate the time to achieve full water turnover in the reservoir (hydraulic residence time), to review potential mixing-related solutions to minimize stagnation within the proposed reservoir, and to evaluate the need for rechlorination at the proposed reservoir site. It is recommended that this project be designed in conjunction with CIP F1: West CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-12 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Hill BPS and CIP F3: West Hill PRVs and Altitude Valves, and constructed at the same time or prior to the West Hill BPS. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CIP F3: West Hill PRVs and Altitude Valves Deficiency: Following construction of the proposed West Hill BPS and Reservoir, the City desires to provide the primary supply to the 529 and 345.5 Zones from the West Hill Reservoir. Installation of PRVs at four locations is recommended to facilitate this operational adjustment and improve fire flow availability downstream of each location. Improvement: Install a PRV station at the following four locations. • Within or adjacent to Pump Station #3 (354.5 Zone to 240 Zone). • Within or adjacent to Pump Station #4 (529 Zone to 354.5 Zone). • Within or adjacent to Pump Station #6 (587 Zone to 529 Zone). • Within or adjacent to Pump Station #7 and on the existing Cambridge Tank site (587 Zone to 529 Zone). The hydraulic grades in the preceding bullets reference the proposed hydraulic grades at these locations, following completion of the proposed West Hill BPS and Reservoir, and the proposed 587 and 575 Zone connection and conversion project (CIP PZ1). Proposed sizing for each PRV station includes a 3-inch PRV for low flows (between 2 and 460 gpm), and an 8-inch PRV for high flows (up to 3,900 gpm) to supplement supply to these zones during a fire flow event. The proposed PRV station within or adjacent to Pump Station #3 allows the Meeker Street transmission main to receive flow from two directions instead of functioning as a dead end, and negates the need for approximately 7,100 linear feet of existing Meeker Street transmission main between Washington Avenue and Pump Station #3 to be replaced with larger diameter main to meet the planning-level fire flow requirement along this alignment. It is recommended that these proposed PRV sizes and flow rates be reviewed during the predesign phase of the CIP F2: West Hill Reservoir project. Altitude valves are recommended to be installed at the existing Reith Road Reservoir and the existing Cambridge Tank locations to prevent reservoir overflows from occurring following installation of the proposed PRV stations. This project location is shown on Figure 9-2. CIP F4: 640 Zone BPS #1 (Blue Boy Standpipe Site) Deficiency: The City is converting the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone to the 640 Zone, which will be supplied by two future BPSs. Improvement: Construct a 640 Zone BPS at the Blue Boy Standpipe site. The proposed BPS will have a firm capacity capable of providing at least the projected 20-year MDD of the 640 Zone, calculated to be 1,132 gpm in Chapter 7. A 640 Zone Phasing Analysis Technical Memorandum, prepared in August 2016 by PACE Engineers, Inc., identified the proposed 640 Zone BPS to include three identical pumps, each equipped with a VFD, and rated for 1,750 gpm at 110 feet total dynamic head (TDH). This project location is shown on Figure 9-6. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-13 CIP F5: 640 Zone BPS #2 (Tacoma POD #3 Site) Deficiency: The City is converting the easterly portion of the existing 590 Zone to the 640 Zone, which will be supplied by two future BPSs. Improvement: Construct a 640 Zone BPS at the City of Tacoma POD #3 site. The proposed BPS will provide redundant supply to the proposed 640 Zone and the 640 Zone BPS #1 that is proposed at the Blue Boy Standpipe site (CIP F5). To provide full redundancy to the 640 Zone, it is assumed that the 640 Zone BPS #2 will be constructed with the same configuration and capacity as the 640 Zone BPS #1, with three identical pumps, each equipped with a VFD, and rated for 1,750 gpm at 110 feet TDH. This project location is shown on Figure 9-7. CIP F6: 125K Tank Exterior Recoating Deficiency: The exterior of the 125K Tank needs to be recoated every 15 to 20 years, based on the typical life of coatings on steel tanks. Improvement: Thoroughly inspect and sample the exterior coating of the 125K Tank to determine the properties of the existing coating and the extent of the required recoating. Recoat the exterior to prevent premature corrosion of the tank exterior. This project location is shown on Figure 9-6. CIP F7: Guiberson Reservoir Replacement Deficiency: The Guiberson Reservoir was constructed in the 1930s and is nearing the end of its useful life. Although multiple upgrades have taken place, the Guiberson Reservoir roof and floor are deficient, and it is recommended that a replacement reservoir be constructed. Improvement: Construct a new reservoir to replace the existing Guiberson Reservoir, with a usable storage volume of approximately 8 to 10 MG, which exceeds the 240 Zone storage volume requirements for the 20-year planning period, as shown in Chapter 7. It is anticipated that the same treatment processes that occur at the existing Guiberson Reservoir will occur at the replacement reservoir, including pH adjustment of water from the Kent Springs Transmission Main by aeration and a sodium hydroxide pH adjustment process. This project location is shown on Figure 9-4. CIP F8: Garrison/O’Brien Treatment Plant Deficiency: Water pumped from the O’Brien Well has high concentrations of iron and manganese that results in discolored water immediately downstream of the well. The City elects to not normally operate the O’Brien Well due to the poor aesthetics of the source water. Improvement: Construct a packaged treatment plant capable of treating the high concentrations of iron and manganese at the O’Brien Well. It is anticipated that the treatment plant will be sized to treat the combined capacity of the Garrison Creek Well and the O’Brien Well to allow raw water from the O’Brien Well to be blended prior to treatment. This project location is shown on Figure 9-5. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-14 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS The following improvements are planning efforts and program elements that are required to comply with various State of Washington water regulations or other miscellaneous improvements that have been identified as necessary for continued safe and reliable operation of the water system. CIP M1: Generator Improvement Program Deficiency: Not all of the City’s water system facilities are equipped with temporary or permanent back-up power, and the City’s existing generators require regular maintenance. Improvement: Improve the back-up power capabilities throughout the water system on an ongoing basis. CIP M2: Reservoir Maintenance and Improvement Program Deficiency: The City’s reservoirs require regular maintenance including, but not limited to, interior and exterior coatings, inspections, piping improvements, and seismic improvements. Improvement: Maintain and improve the reservoirs as necessary. CIP M3: Tacoma Regional Water Supply System (RWSS) Deficiency: The City’s interties with the City of Tacoma pipeline require ongoing improvements. Improvement: Perform improvements related to the City of Tacoma interties and pipeline as necessary. CIP M4: Transmission Main Easements/Land Acquisitions Deficiency: Not all transmission mains have adequate easement width for maintenance and repair. Improvement: The City will work to acquire necessary easements to allow for maintenance and repair. CIP M5: Water System Plan Update Deficiency: Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-290-100 requires that the City’s WSP be updated every 10 years and submitted to DOH for review and approval. Improvement: The City will update and submit its WSP every 10 years to comply with State requirements. CIP M6: Watershed Control Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan, and Wellhead Protection Program Deficiency: The Watershed Control Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan, and Wellhead Protection Program require ongoing management and updates. Improvement: The City will update and implement the Watershed Control Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan, and Wellhead Protection Programs in accordance with State requirements. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-15 CIP M7: Landsburg Mine Management Deficiency: The Landsburg Mine is located upstream of Clark Springs and contains toxic contaminants. Improvement: The City manages and coordinates Landsburg Mine clean-up plans, which are anticipated to be an ongoing effort. CIP M8: Automatic Meter Reading System Deficiency: The City desires to evaluate the feasibility of, and to implement, an automatic meter reading (AMR) system for the City’s water system meters. Improvement: The City will evaluate the feasibility of an AMR system, and if deemed viable, will implement and install an AMR system. Benefits of an AMR system are likely to include the following. • Elimination of cyclical manual meter reading costs. • Reduced billing expenses. • Reduced fuel, fleet maintenance, and labor costs. • Increased understanding of baseline and peak demands in smaller areas to assist with water system planning and identification of system losses. • Identification of oversized meters that subsequently under-report consumption. • Detection of reverse water flow and tampering. • Information for customers regarding abnormal consumption potentially indicative of leaks, and the ability to provide customers access to their own data in hourly or daily intervals to allow customers to better understand their own usage. CIP M9: PLC Upgrade Program Deficiency: The City’s programmable logic controllers (PLC) require ongoing upgrades and improvements. Improvement: Maintain and improve the system’s PLCs as necessary to facilitate continued connectivity and control of water system facilities. CIP M10: SCADA System Upgrades Deficiency: The City’s supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system software and hardware require upgrades to enhance its capabilities and reliability. Improvement: Upgrade the SCADA system software and hardware as necessary to facilitate continued connectivity and control of water system facilities. CIP M11: Well Rehabilitation Program Deficiency: The City’s wells require ongoing maintenance and rehabilitation to allow them to continually provide reliable supply to the City’s system. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-16 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Improvement: Perform well maintenance and rehabilitation of approximately two wells on an annual basis. Typical tasks associated with this improvement include removing the well pump and motor from the well casing; inspecting the equipment condition and performing repairs or rebuilding equipment as necessary; performing a video inspection of the well casing; and reinstalling the equipment and returning the well(s) to service. ESTIMATING COSTS OF IMPROVEMENTS Project costs for the proposed improvements were estimated based on costs of similar, recently constructed water projects in the City and around the Puget Sound area and are presented in 2019 dollars. The project cost estimates include the estimated construction cost of the improvement, as well as indirect costs estimated at 35 percent of the construction cost for engineering preliminary design, final design, and construction management services, permitting, legal, and administrative services. The project cost estimates include a 20-percent contingency and sales tax of 10.0 percent. Project cost estimates for water main projects were determined from the water main unit costs (i.e., cost per foot length) shown in Table 9-2 and the proposed diameter and approximate length of each improvement. Table 9-2 Water Main Unit Costs Water Main Diameter (inches) Project Cost per Foot Length (2019 $ per LF) 8 $317 12 $350 16 $383 18 $417 21 $453 24 $492 8 $633 12 $700 16 $766 18 $833 21 $906 24 $984 Standard Piping Seismically Restrained Piping The unit costs for each water main size are based on estimates of construction-related improvements, such as materials and labor for the water main installation, water services, fire hydrants, fittings, valves, connections to the existing system, trench restoration, asphalt surface restoration, other work necessary for a complete installation, contingency, and sales tax. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (10/2/2019 3:09 PM) 9-17 Additional costs were added to some water main improvements to cover anticipated, increased costs related to the project location and degree of difficulty. PRIORITIZING IMPROVEMENTS The water system improvements were prioritized from established criteria to formulate a schedule that identifies projects with the most deficiencies and greatest need for improvement to be completed prior to projects with fewer deficiencies. A description of the criteria and method for prioritizing each category of improvements is provided in the following sections. WATER MAIN IMPROVEMENTS Table 9-3 lists criteria that were established for prioritizing the water main improvements. The criteria are based on the underlying deficiencies of the existing water main that will be replaced by the proposed water main improvements. The criteria are arranged in seven different categories with a weight factor assigned to each category. The criteria given the most weight are the Seismic Vulnerability, the Proximity to Critical Slopes, the Existing Water Main Maintenance/Breaks, and the Existing Water Main Fire Flow Capability categories. The Seismic Vulnerability category ranks the water main improvements based on the vulnerability of the water main during a M9.0 seismic event, as identified in the Seismic Vulnerability Assessment prepared by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants in April 2017. The Proximity to Critical Slopes category ranks the water main improvements based on the slope of the ground surface adjacent to the water main, based on the 10-foot contour data provided by the City. The Existing Water Main Maintenance/Breaks category ranks the water main improvements based on the number of reported leaks or breaks that the City currently has on record. The Existing Water Main Fire Flow Capability category ranks the water main improvements based on the ability of the existing water mains to provide the required fire flow, as determined from the results of the hydraulic analyses in Chapter 7. The Existing Water Main Material category ranks the water main improvements based on the material of the existing water main. The Existing Water Main Year of Installation category ranks the water main improvements based on the age of the existing water mains. The Existing Water Main Benefit Area category ranks the water main improvements based on the size of the area that will benefit from the replacement. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-18 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Table 9-3 Water Main Improvements Priority Ranking Criteria Weight Weighted Points Category Factor Points 5 High Vulnerability (Net Repair Rate > 0.27)3 15 3 Medium Vulnerability (Net Repair Rate between 0.16 and 0.27)3 9 0 Low Vulnerability (Net Repair Rate < 0.16)3 0 5 Steep Slopes (Slope Exceeds 30%)3 15 3 Medium Slopes (Slopes Between 15-30%)3 9 0 Gentle or Flat Slopes (Slopes Less Than 15%)3 0 5 High Maintenance Requirements/High Frequency of Recent Breaks 3 15 3 Annual Maintenance/Recent History of Breaks 3 9 0 No Maintenance and No History of Problems 3 0 5 Derated Fire Flow is 59% or less of Required Fire Flow 3 15 4 Derated Fire Flow is 60-69% of Required Fire Flow 3 12 3 Derated Fire Flow is 70-79% of Required Fire Flow 3 9 2 Derated Fire Flow is 80-89% of Required Fire Flow 3 6 1 Derated Fire Flow is 90-99% of Required Fire Flow 3 3 0 Derated Fire Flow is 100% of Required Fire Flow 3 0 5 Galvanized or Steel 2 10 4 Asbestos Cement 2 8 3 Cast Iron or Unknown 2 6 2 Copper 2 4 1 HDPE 2 2 0 Ductile Iron or PVC 2 0 5 Before 1950 2 10 4 1950-1959 2 8 3 1960-1969 2 6 2 1970-1979 2 4 1 1980-1989 2 2 0 After 1989 2 0 5 Large Benefit Area (greater than 500 gpm)1 5 4 Large Area Served (250 to 500 gpm)1 4 3 Medium to Large Area Service (100 to 250 gpm)1 3 2 Medium Area Served (50 to 100 gpm)1 2 1 Small to Medium Area Served (25 to 50 gpm)1 1 0 Small or Localized Area Served (less than 25 gpm)1 0 (2) Flows based on existing maximum day demands. Seismic Vulnerability1 Existing Water Main Fire Flow Capability (1) Based on the data presented in Figure 2-4A (Estimated Pipe Repair Rate for Three Pipe Categories for the M9.0 CSZ Earthquake Scenario) of the April 2017 Seismic Vulnerability Assessment prepared by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants. Existing Water Main Benefit Area2 Existing Water Main Year of Installation Existing Water Main Material Existing Water Main Maintenance/Breaks Proximity to Critical Slopes CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-19 The water main priority ranking criteria were applied to the annual water main replacement projects, with the weighted points associated with each project ranging between 1 and 53 points. These projects were categorized as high, medium, and low priority projects, with projects scoring more than 32 points identified as high priority projects, projects scoring between 17 and 32 points identified as medium priority projects, and projects scoring less than 17 points identified as low priority projects. The City will endeavor to complete most of the high priority projects within the 20-year planning period and has grouped these projects within CIP WM1, with the schedule to complete these projects CIP Nos. 1 through 55, as shown in Figures 9-9 through 9-15, reflect the projects within CIP WM1, and are generally numbered from west to east throughout the water system. These projects reflect the high priority water main replacement projects necessary to meet the City’s 2019 design criteria, and are presented in Table 9-4 with their weighted point totals. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-20 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Table 9-4 High Priority Distribution System Replacement Projects to Meet 2019 Design Criteria In From To 1 1,597 8 CI S 262nd St, 46th Ave S 43rd Ave S Kent Ct $506,000 35 2 632 16 AC S Reith Rd Military Rd S 38th Ave S $243,000 34 3 2,902 8 UNK S 256th St, S 253rd St, 35th Pl S 32nd Pl S S 252nd Pl $919,000 39 4 623 12 CI, UNK 42nd Pl S S 253rd St Cul-de-Sac near Reith Road Tank $218,000 34 5 2,980 8 AC, CI, DI, UNK 35th Ave S S 240th St Military Rd S $944,000 43 6 898 8 DI Between Dead-Ends W Valley Hwy S 266th St $285,000 ---3 7 3,247 12 CI, DI 72nd Ave S Private Property 72nd Ave near Union Pacific Railroad $1,137,000 36 8 2,023 12 CI, DI 68th Ave S, W Valley Hwy, Private Property S 188th St 72nd Ave S $708,000 37 9 6,499 12, 16 CI, DI S 200th St, 81st Ave S, 78th Ave S, S 196th St 84th Ave S 84th Ave S $2,261,000 39 10 4,400 12 CI, UNK Private Property 64th Ave S Washington Ave S $1,540,000 36 11 2,406 12 CI, DI, UNK W Smith St 64th Ave S Thompson Ave N $842,000 44 12 1,577 12 CI, DI, UNK 68th Ave S, Private Property S Sent Des Moines Rd 74th Ave S $552,000 47 13 1,126 12 DI Naden Ave S W Meeker St SR 516 $394,000 47 14 606 12 UNK Madison Ave W Smith St W Meeker St $213,000 44 15 809 12 DI, UNK W Harrison St, Thompson Ave N W Meeker St Washington Ave N $284,000 44 16 3,117 12 AC, CI, DI, UNK James St 66th Avenue S 5th Avenue N $2,182,000 34 17 2,793 8, 12 CI, UNK 3rd Ave S W Willis St S 259th St $932,000 48 18 2,290 12 CI, DI 5th Ave S, Private Property 3rd Ave S S 259th St $802,000 42 19 818 8 CI, DI 5th Ave S Rachael Pl Dead-end near W Overlock $259,000 38 20 1,652 12, 16 CI, UNK E Willis St, W Willis St 4th Ave S Central Ave S $595,000 35 21 1,821 8, 12 DI, UNK 2nd Ave S W Meeker St W Crow St $599,000 44 22 936 12 UNK W Titus St 4th Ave S 1st Ave S $328,000 33 23 4,817 12, 16 AC, CI, DI E Meeker St Central Ave S Kennebeck Ave S $3,412,000 50 24 2,550 12 DI, UNK E Smith St N Lincoln Ave 1st Ave N $893,000 47 25 1,955 12 CI, DI, UNK N Lincoln Ave W James St W Meeker St $685,000 44 26 907 12 CI, DI 5th Ave N, Private Property Private Property W James St $228,000 40 27 4,103 12 CI, DI, UNK 1st Ave S, 80th Ave S E Willis St 79th Ave S $1,436,000 35 28 293 10 CI E Morton St Railroad Ave S Bridges Ave S $103,000 46 29 1,377 10 CI Railroad Ave S E Willis St Dead-end near Private Property $482,000 47 30 1,383 12 CI Bridges Ave S E Willis St Dead-end near Private Property $484,000 47 31 306 12 CI E Saar St Railroad Ave S Central Ave S $108,000 44 32 748 16 DI Central Ave S E Titus St E Willis St $287,000 47 33 1,179 12 UNK 1st Ave S W Meeker St W Titus St $413,000 38 34 1,827 8, 12 CI State Ave N E Smith St Ward St $616,000 53 35 420 12 CI Ward St State Ave N Kennebeck Ave S $147,000 45 36 1,632 12 AC, CI, DI, UNK E Smith St Railroad Ave N Jason Ave N $572,000 46 37 3,239 12, 16 CI, DI Railroad Ave N E James St E Willis St $1,155,000 48 38 3,930 12, 16 DI, UNK 4th Ave N North of W Cloudy St W Saar St $1,418,000 39 39 1,339 8, 12, 16 CI, DI 3rd Ave N Cole St W James St $449,000 46 40 1,327 8, 12 CI, DI 2nd Ave N Cole St W James St $443,000 42 41 2,018 12 CI, DI, UNK 1st Ave N West of Cole St W James St $707,000 46 42 6,685 12, 16 CI, CONC, DI Central Ave N S 228th St E Titus St $4,764,000 47 43 717 12, 16 CI, DI Kennebeck Ave N E James St E Temperance St $255,000 34 44 467 12 DI, UNK N State Ave E George St E James St $164,000 33 45 1,158 12 AC, CI, DI Clark Ave N E James St E Temperance St $406,000 37 46 8,464 8, 12, 16 CI, DI Riverbend Industrial Area Central Pl S S 259th St $2,927,000 39 47 3,739 12, 16 CI S 259th St 5th Ave S 88th Ave S $1,349,000 43 48 1,939 8 CI, UNK E Chicago St, Wynwood Dr, Marion St Van De Vanter Ave Van De Vanter Ave $614,000 43 49 297 12 CI W Titus St Central Ave S Railroad Ave S $104,000 46 50 1,995 8 CI, DI, UNK E Chicago St Van De Vanter Ave Woodland Way $622,000 38 51 609 12 CI, UNK Summit Ave N, Canyon Dr E Smith St Weiland St $214,000 40 52 284 12 CI E Pioneer St Railroad Ave N Central Ave N $100,000 46 53 1,855 12 CI Hazel Ave N, Stetson Ave E James St Dead-end $650,000 36 54 2,037 16, 21 CI, DI, UNK 104th Ave SE SE 234th Pl SE 240th St $788,000 35 55 2,914 16 CI, DI, UNK 108th Ave SE, SE 260th St Kent Kangley Rd SE 264th St $1,117,000 33 (1) UNK = unknown material (2) Cost estimates for CIP Nos. 14, 53, and 55 include seismically restrained water main. (3) Recommended to improve water quality and provide looping; no existing level-of-service deficiencies adjacent to proposed improvement alignment. Estimated Cost2 Weighted Points Location CIP No. Length (LF) Prop. Diam. (inches) Existing Material1 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-21 OTHER IMPROVEMENTS The additional water main, pressure zone, and facility improvements were prioritized based on existing deficiencies, safety concerns, and maintenance and capacity requirements. The miscellaneous improvements were prioritized based on regulatory requirements, funding availability, and an assessment of other water system needs. The priority order of these improvements is reflected in the schedule of improvements presented in the next section. Figures 9-16 through 9-22 present all City-identified and distribution system replacement projects necessary to meet the City’s 2019 design criteria. Water main replacement projects categorized as medium and low priority projects are not specifically funded within the 20-year planning period. These projects are anticipated to be completed within the 20-year planning period only if they are developer funded and determined to be necessary for redevelopment. High priority water main replacement projects necessary to meet the City’s 2019 design criteria are endeavored to be replaced by the City within the 20-year planning period, but if specific schedules for the replacement of these water mains are necessary for redevelopment, these specific projects will be developer funded. SCHEDULE OF IMPROVEMENTS The improvement prioritization results were used to assist in establishing an implementation schedule that can be used by the City for preparing its 10-year CIP and annual water budget. The implementation schedule for the proposed improvements is shown in Table 9-5. An average allowance of approximately $2,200,000 per year has been established for the annual replacement of high priority water mains. The City will identify and schedule the replacement of these water mains during its annual budget process. This provides the City with the flexibility to coordinate these projects with road or other projects in the same areas. Should the completion of a high priority water main replacement project be necessary for development or redevelopment at a schedule that differs from the schedule identified by the City during its annual budget process, the project shall be developer funded. As the existing infrastructure continues to age, managing and funding the water system CIP is essential to maintaining a safe and reliable water supply for the City’s customers. Based on the existing level of repair and replacement identified by the City for the water system CIP, the amount of water main in the system that is greater than 65 years old will increase from 2 percent to 19 percent by the end of the 20-year planning period, as shown in Chart 9-2. As funding becomes available, the City should consider a more aggressive water main repair and replacement program or continue to develop asset management strategies to address future infrastructure needs. CHAPTER 9 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 9-22 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) Chart 9-2 Existing and Future Water Main Age Existing Water Main Age Water Main Age with 2019 to 2038 Improvements Less than 25 Years Old 25 to 55 Years Old 55 to 65 Years Old 65 to 75 Years Old Greater than 75 Years Old Unknown 23% 54% 12% 2% 0% 9%15% 41%18% 13% 6% 7% FUTURE PROJECT COST ADJUSTMENTS All cost estimates shown in the tables are presented in year 2019 dollars. It is recommended that future costs be adjusted to account for the effects of inflation and changing construction market conditions at the actual time of project implementation. Future costs can be estimated using the Engineering News Record (ENR) Construction Cost Index for the Seattle area or by applying an estimated rate of inflation that reflects the current and anticipated future market conditions. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH9.DOC (9/30/2019 1:53 PM) 9-23 Table 9-5 Proposed Improvements Implementation Schedule Estimated Cost No.Description (2019 $)Prior to 2019 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029-2038 Beyond 2038 WM1 Annual Water Main Replacement Program - High Priority $44,876,000 $1,960K $1,500K $400K $400K $698K $535K $3,365K $3,465K $2,765K $2,855K $26,433K $500K WM2 Veterans Drive and Military Road Transmission Main $6,000,000 $1,100K $1,100K $2,150K $1,650K WM3 Reith Road Transmission Main Improvements $500,000 $500K WM4 68th Avenue S Transmission Main Improvements $12,890,000 $12,890K WM5 S 212th Street Transmission Main Improvements $6,900,000 $6,900K WM6 84th Avenue S Transmission Main Improvements $9,180,000 $9,180K WM7 Guiberson Reservoir Transmission Main Improvements $5,000,000 $5,000K WM8 78th Avenue S Water Main Improvements $2,000,000 $2,000K WM9 88th Avenue S Water Main Improvements $490,000 $490K WM10 S 218th Street Transmission Main Improvements $930,000 $930K WM11 SE 284th Street Water Main Improvements $1,810,000 $1,810K WM12 640 Zone BPS #2 Transmission Main Improvements $2,230,000 $1,115K $1,115K WM13 590 Zone Transmission Main Downstream of Tacoma POD #3 $980,000 $980K PZ1 Military Road Connection Between 587 and 575 Zones $1,220,000 $1,220K PZ2 640 Zone Conversion $2,920,000 $2,171K $749K F1 West Hill BPS $2,800,000 $1,000K $1,400K $400K F2 West Hill Reservoir $12,500,000 $132K $8,200K $2,916K $1,050K $202K F3 West Hill PRVs and Altitude Valves $800,000 $400K $400K F4 640 Zone BPS #1 (Blue Boy Standpipe Site)$3,250,000 $3,250K F5 640 Zone BPS #2 (Tacoma POD #3 Site)$3,000,000 $1,500K $1,500K F6 125K Tank Exterior Recoating $1,300,000 $1,300K F7 Guiberson Reservoir Replacement $12,000,000 $12,000K F8 Garrison/O'Brien Treatment Plant $1,300,000 $1,300K M1 Generator Improvement Program $2,000,000 $1,000K $1,000K M2 Reservoir Maintenance and Improvement Program $10,000,000 $546K $100K $500K $500K $500K $500K $500K $500K $500K $500K $5,354K M3 Tacoma Regional Water Supply System (RWSS)$1,338,000 $338K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $500K M4 Transmission Main Easements/Land Acquisitions $1,000,000 $108K $150K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $50K $292K M5 Water System Plan Update $915,000 $115K $400K $400K M6 Watershed Control Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan, and Wellhead Protection Program $8,000,000 $2,964K $1,222K $413K $3,401K M7 Landsburg Mine Management $2,026,000 $132K $790K $804K $300K M8 Automatic Meter Reading System $3,000,000 $3,000K M9 PLC Upgrade Program $770,000 $70K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $35K $350K M10 SCADA System Upgrades $500,000 $150K $100K $100K $150K M11 Well Rehabilitation Program $4,087,000 $212K $275K $200K $200K $200K $200K $200K $200K $200K $200K $2,000K Total Estimated Costs of City Funded Improvements $168,512,000 $12,696K $12,719K $5,627K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $6,000K $60,000K $29,470K 20-Year Schedule of Improvements Water Main Improvements Pressure Zone Improvements Facility Improvements Miscellaneous Improvements Planned Year of Project and Estimated Cost in 2019 $ THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 84THAVES256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMIL ITARYRDSJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TITUSST192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES STK ENT-DESMOI NE S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674T H A VENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESER EIT E N RD24THAVES228THST 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KA N G L E Y RD104THAVESE218THSTSR 167272ND ST 212TH ST 112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 T H S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242ND ST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEASTVALLEYHW YSINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEPZ2 WM7 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM5 WM10 WM3 WM6 PZ2 WM4 WM13 WM9 PZ1 WM12 WM8 W M 11 WM2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Unincorporated KingCounty (O utside U GA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Facilities Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Intertie PRV Water Main Distribution Main Transmission Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-1 CIP-PRIORITY_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: WGS 1984 WEB MERCATOR AUXILIARY SPHEREVicinity Map City of KentCity of KentCapital Improvement Projects2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis m ap is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System . Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is ow ned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue BoyStandpipe0.97 MG GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Tacoma POD #3 Lak eMeridian Armstrong SpringsWells City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F4: Proposed640 Zone BPS #1 CIP F5: Proposed640 Zone BPS #2 Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) CIP F7: GuibersonReservoir Replacement Figure 9-120-Year System-wideCIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating Transmission Main From:Clark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1 CIP F8: Garrison/O’BrienTreatment Plant Cambridge Tank0.3 MG 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5 ZONE 529 ZONE 587 ZONE 23 0 T HST232ND ST 40THAVES24TH PL SLAKESIDEBLVDW KENT-D E S M OIN E S R D 272ND ST 2 7 T H P L S 228TH ST 236T HP L 235TH ST 55T H AVES56THPLS50THAVES55THPLS21STAVES 2 3 3 R D ST 273RD S T 48TH AVE S33RDAVES254TH ST 237TH PL 27THAVESHAMPTON WAY 47TH PL S270TH ST 2 3 1 S T PL 3 8 T HAVES260TH ST 38TH PL S 2 5 7 T H S T41STAVES 271ST S T 53RDPLS259THLN30THAVES 262ND ST LAKE FENWICK RD S236TH S T 234TH S T 251ST PL 259TH PL 254TH ST26TH PL S3 6 T H AVES269TH ST 272ND ST 26 8TH PL CARNABYW A Y 2 3 4T H PL51ST PL S 253RDST 232ND S T 2 3 2ND P L 242ND ST 2 4 T HA VES51STPL S 5 1 S T AVES 24T H PL S250TH ST24THAVES HIG HLAND AVE31STAVES 253RD PL 36THPLSI-5 FWY2 6 0TH LN 252ND ST 243RD ST 43RD PL S42ND PL S23RDPLS43RD CT S36THLNSAVONCT264TH ST 255TH ST 268TH ST 246TH ST 39THPLS245TH CT 2 5 6 T H P L 232N D PL35THLNSCAMBRI DGE P L 244TH ST 242ND ST 51STCTS37THAVES32ND PL S32ND PL S43RDAVES256TH ST34 T H A V E S37TH PL S29THAVES46THAVE S 246TH PL 35THAVES258TH PL 258TH ST 257TH PL 256TH PL 262ND PL 42NDAVESPACIFIC HWY S2 5 9 T H C T 231ST ST 27TH AVE S I-5FWY42NDAVES253RD PL 236TH ST 22ND PL S 34TH PL S30THAVES39THAVES23RD PL S252ND PL 254TH CT 44TH PL S240TH ST 36THPLS239TH ST F E N W I C K C T 45TH PL S252ND PL 45THAVES56THAVES36THAVESS T R A T T F ORDCT 41ST PL S25THAVES24 8 T H P L 241ST ST SAXONCT247TH ST PRINCETON AVE24TH AVE S 31STAVES250TH ST 234TH ST MILITARY RD S33RD PL S255TH PL 35THPLS252ND ST 258 T HPL 271ST PLMILITARYRDS32NDAVES249TH ST KENTCT 251ST ST23RD PL S2 7 0 TH ST 33RD PL S42NDPLSSOME RSET LN 243RD ST BRISTOLCTM EE K E R S TCAMBRIDGE DRDOWNING AVE S OME RSET C T236 T H ST 43RDAVES261ST ST 249TH ST 248TH ST 272ND W A Y42NDPLSI-5FWYARDENCT272ND PL HAMPTONCT26THPLS 233RD PL 229TH PL 28THAVESRAMP265TH ST27THAVES25THLNS CANTERB UR Y LN23RDAVES26THAVESREITH RDRIVERVIEW BLVD S 238TH ST28THAVES25THAVES 251STST 26THAVES5 2 N D A V E S 4 8 T HPLS 261ST PL CARDIFF AVEV E T E R A N S D R 260TH ST 23 9 THPL54THAVES248TH ST 46THAVES47TH AVES4 5 T H P L S RUSS E L L RDS 35TH PL SRAMP 263RD ST35THAVE S FRAGERRDSKENT - D E S MO IN E S R D S 52ND LN SFRAGERRD S 16''16'' 1 6''16''16''16''1 6'' 1 6''16''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''6''8''8''6''16'' 16''16''16''16''16'' 8'' 8''16''1 6''16' '16''16''16''16''16''8''8'' 6''6''6'' 6''6''6''6'' 6''6''6''6'' 6 ''6''6''6'' 8 ''8''6''6''6''6'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6 ''8''8''6''6''6'' 8'' 6''6''6''6''6''6'' 4''4''1 6'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''8''8'' 6 ''8''8''8'' 8''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''10 '' 1 0 ''10''8''8''12''12''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 6''6'' 6''6''6'' 8'' 4 ''8''8''8''8''4''4''8''6 ''6 '' 8 '' 8'' 8 ''8''8''4''8''8''6''8''8'' 8''8''8''4''6''8''8''8''16''16''8''8''8''8''4''4''12''12''6'' 6'' 8''8''12' ' 4''4''4''6''6''8''8''8''8''6 ''4''6''12'' 12'' 6''6''4''6''6''4''8''4''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8'' 4''4''6'' 4 ''4' '4''6''6''8'' 4'' 6''6''6'' 6''6''6'' 6'' 2''4''4''8''8''8' '8''2''12''12'' 12''12''12''12' '4''8''8''8''6''4''6'' 8'' 12''6''12''12''12' '4''6''6''6''4''12''12''12''12 '' 6 '' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 8 '' 4''6' '6''8 ''6'' 8'' 8'' 4''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''4''6''6''6''8''6 '' 6 ''8''4''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8' '6''6''6''6''6'' 6''6''6'' 6 ''6''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''8''8''6''6''8''8''6 ''6''6''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''6''6''6'' 8''8''8''6''6''6''8'' 4''8''8''6''6''6'' 6 ''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 12''12'' 6''6''8''8''8''8'' 6''6''6''6''6'' 6'' 8''8''8''2'' 2'' 2'' 6 ''6 ''6''WM3 PZ1 WM2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone Tacoma Tr ansmission Main City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-2 CIP-WEST_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-2 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan West Hill Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. LakeFenwick Green River Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #8 CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F3: PumpStation #3 PRV CIP F3: PumpStation #4 PRV CIP F3: PumpStation #6 PRV CIP F3: PumpStation #7 PRV Cambridge Tank0.3 MG UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT Íi Íi 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5ZONE WASHINGTONAVEN236TH ST 38THAVESLAKE SID E BLVDW 235TH ST 233RD ST 55T H AVES56THPLS60THCTS50THAVES55THPLS61ST PL S237 TH PL JAMESP L 62NDWAYS 6 4 T H A V E S38THPLS2 3 1S T PL K E N T -D E S M O I N E S RD S45THAVES41STAVES238TH PL53RDPLS40THPLS226THST RAMP42ND PL S251STPL JAMES LN215TH P L44THPLS59T H PL S 215TH S T 63RD WAY S 2 3 4T H PL42NDAVES41STPLS36THAVES2 32N D S T 23 2 N D PL218THPL 242ND ST 63RDAVES217TH ST 220THPL 237T H ST 242ND PL214TH WAY5 1 S T AVES LAKESIDEBLVDE67TH PL S43RDPLS66THAVES51STAVES238TH STMORTON ST K E N T -D E S M O INES RD 236TH PL 245TH CT 46THPLS239TH ST 209TH PL 232N D C T 58TH AVES 61STAVES53RDPLS225THPL RI VERVIEWBLVDS51STCTS43RDAVES220T HST 62ND PL S223RD ST 234TH ST39THWAYS216TH PL 239TH PL65THAVES211THPL 39THAVES60THAVES221ST PL WEST V A L L E Y H WY S42NDAVES3 5THPLSWASHINGTONAVES221STS T 57TH AVE S JAMES CT JAMES ST56THAVES239THST64THAVES HARRISON ST 24 8 T H P L 241ST ST 41STAVESMEEKER ST 62NDAVES53RDAVES54THAVES247 T H S T KENT-DESMOI NESRDS250TH ST 46TH AVE S 234TH ST 214TH PL 210TH ST 209TH ST 67THAVES211TH S T 243RD ST 222NDP L236 T H ST SMITH CT 249TH ST 248TH ST 42NDPLS224TH PL 2 1 6 T H S T 35TH PL S4 6 THAVES233RD PL SM ITH ST 212TH ST 3 7 T H P L S 40THAVES58TH PL S59TH PL S40 THWAYS41STPLS68THAVESMI L I TARYRDSMILITARY RD S50THAVES238TH ST 216TH ST 231ST ST 224TH ST 2 4 9 T H S T43RDAVES240TH ST212THST 228TH S T 208TH ST V E T E R A N S D R RIDGE VIEWDR52ND WAY S35THAVES2 12TH CT 62NDAVES23 9 THPL45THAVE S 2 5 1 S T S T 220T H S T 226TH ST 219TH ST REITHR D 4 5 T H P L S39THPLS 66THAVES42NDAVESORILLI ARDSF R A G E R R D SRUSSELL RD SFRAGER RD S FRAGERRDSRUS S ELLRDS FRAGERRD S 16''16''16''16''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 '' 1 6''16''16''16''16''16''1 6''16' ' 12'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''8''8''6'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8 '' 1 6''16' ' 1 6''16' ' 10''8''8''8''12'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''6''10''6''6'' 8''8''8''12''12''12''12''10''12''12''6''12' '10''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''8'' 8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''6''8' '8''8'' 1 2 ''12''12''6'' 6 '' 8'' 8''8''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''1 0 ''6''8''8'' 8 ''10'' 10'' 8'' 4''8''1 6 ''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6''12''12''12''12''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8'' 1 0 '' 8'' 8''10''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8'' 8'' 3'' 12'' 1 2''10''8'' 8'' 8''12''4 ''8'' 10'' 8''8''8''8''10'' 4''4''12''12''10''10''10''10''8''12''12''8 '' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''12''12''10''4''8''8''8''6''8''10'' 10''8''8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 10''10''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''4''8'' 8 '' 8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''8 '' 8'' 8 ''12''8''8''8''6''4''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''8''6''8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8''10''8''10''8 '' 8''6''6''8''8''8'' 6'' 8''8'' 1 2 '' 1 2 ''12''12''8'' 8''6''6'' 2''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''10''8''8''8''6''8 ''12''12''12''12'' 1 2'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6 '' 8'' 8 ''8''8'' 8 ''8''12' '8''8'' 8'' 1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 8''8''8'' 8''10''10'' 8'' 6 ''8''4''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8'' 6''8''8'' 8'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8' '8''10''1 0 ''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2''12''12'' 8 ''6''6''6''10''10''12''12''12''12''6'' 6'' 8''12''12''12''10'' 8'' 8'' 1 0 ''1 0 ''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8'' 4''12''12''12''12''12''10''8''8'' 6''8''8''14''12''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 10'' 2'' 2'' 8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''10''10''8''8'' 12''12'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''6'' 6 '' 12''12''8 ''8''8''8'' 8''8' '8''8''8''8''1 0 ''10'' 8''8'' 8''8''8'' 1''1''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''FFWM2 FFWM5 FFWM4 N DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities UT Reservoir !(W Well !(S Spring ")I Inter tie Íi Pump Station #*PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-3 CIP-WEST 240_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: RWITHERS PLOT DATE: MAY 13, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-3 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - West Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent.Green RiverPumpStation #3 CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F3: PumpStation #3 PRV 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 590ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONE 308 ZONE 366ZONE 271 ZONE 368ZONE 339 ZONE JAMES ST88THAVES 242ND S T MEEKER ST VANDEVANTERAVE94THAVESCENTRALAVENJAMES ST KENT-DES MOINES RD S 277TH ST W O O D L A N D W A YSR 167WALN UT ST SMITH ST4THAVEN WILLIS ST 266TH ST SCENIC WAYGOW E ST TITUS STGUIBERSON ST CREST AVESR 167ALEXANDER AVE262ND PLJAMES LNGARFIELD AVERAMPSEATTLE ST5THAVEN4THAVES4THAVESKENSINGTONAVESSTATEAVENKENNEBECKAVES 252ND ST CARTER PL67TH PL S66THAVES251ST ST HILLCRESTAVEMORTON ST 233R D P L WASHINGTONAVESR E IT E N R D SUMMITAVENWO O D L A N D WA Y6THAVEN CENTRALAVES2NDAVENSTATEAVES240T H S T 248T H ST WALNUT ST 232NDST 2 3 7 T H PL FILBERT ST 238TH PL 239TH PL HEMLOCK ST OLYMPICWAY TEMPERANCE ST CEDAR ST DEAN ST7THAVEN MO RTON STMADISON AVERUSSEL LSTTHOMPSON AVE3RDAVES2NDAVES1STAVES94THAVES79THAVESSTATEAVENLINCOLNAVEWE S T V AL L EYHWYSCLOUDY ST C A N Y O N D R S E SAAR ST SMITH ST CROW ST ME E K E R S T 97THAVESCOLE ST CLARKAVEN96THAVES96THAVESJASONAVENSTETSON AVEALVORDAVE242ND CT CHICAGO ST IVES AVESEATTLE PL 277TH ST EAST LN234T H PL WARDST RAMS A YWAYHAWL E Y RD BRIDGESAVESRAILROADAVES244TH P L CHICAGO ST6THAVES5THAVES 2NDAVESHAZELAVEN2 4 0 T H P L 1STAVES2 4 3 R D S T KENSINGTON AVE258THP L WESTVIEWCTWOODFORDAVEN W EILANDST WATERMAN ST MAPLE ST MARION ST WASHINGTONAVE N 71ST PL S241ST STSAM ST 266TH ST 239TH S T 261 ST ST SMITH ST 239TH ST 245TH PL 246TH PLKENNEBECKAVENRAILROADAVEN KIMBERLYAVE6THAVENJAME S PL 68THAVES261 S T S T3RDAVEN1STAVEN2NDAVENALDER LN68THAVESNOVAKLN 259TH ST 97TH PL S97T H AVES78THAVESWYNW OODDRKENOS IAAVE80THAVESALPIN EW A YC E N T R A L P L SHARRISO N ST TILDENAVE2 3 1 STST 259T H ST RIDGE VIEWDRSR 1671STAVENLENORAAVENPROSPECTAVEN235T H PL84THPLS91STAVES MACLYN ST 262ND ST 234TH ST 272ND ST MAPLEWOOD AVELAUREL STRAMP MAPLE STALVORDAVEN5THAVES235THPLHILLTOPAVEN MAPLE LNFRAGERRDS 262ND ST GREENRIVERR DNADENAVES72NDAVESHAWLEY RDEAST VALLEY HWY S74THAVES94TH PL S24 ''24''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''16''16''1 6'' 12''16''8''6''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''10'' 6''6'' 6'' 6''6' '6''6''6''8''6''8'' 6''6''8''8''6''6''6''10''10'' 2'' 12''12'' 12'' 8''8 ''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''12''8''8'' 12''1 2 ''12''8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 12''1 2 '' 6''6'' 6'' 6'' 6''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8 ''8''10''10''10''8''8''8''8''8''10''8''8 ''8''8'' 6'' 8''8''6''12''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''10''10''10''10''10''12''6''6'' 6''6''6''6''10''10''10''10'' 8''8'' 8 ''6''24''6''8''8''8'' 1 0 ''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''24''24''24''2 4'' 24'' 2 4'' 2 4'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''6''8''8''6''8'' 4'' 8 '' 1 0 ''8''4''8 ''8''8''8''6''8'' 8''8'' 8''6''6''6''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8' '8'' 8'' 8'' 6''6''6''8''8''10''8''10''6''6'' 6''8''12''8''6''6''6''6''6'' 10''4''6''6''8''8''8''8''10''10''8''8''16''8''6''6''2''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''6''6''12'' 12'' 10''8''8''10''1 6 '' 8'' 10'' 4'' 8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 4''10''6''6''6''8''8''10''6''8'' 16''6''6''6''6''10''10''10''10''8''8''8''8''10''10''10''10''8''8''12''6'' 8 ''2''12''12''12'' 8'' 6'' 8 ''10''8''8'' 8''8''8''4''6''8''8''8''2'' 4'' 4''8''10''6'' 6'' 8''8 '' 8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''6''6''6''10''6'' 8 ''8''8''8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''10''10''10''10''10''8''6''6 ''12''12''12''12''12''8'' 8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''2''1 0 '' 10''10''6''8''4''8''8 ''8''6''6''6''8 '' 8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''6'' 6 '' 6'' 6''6'' 12''12''1 2 ''12''6''12''8''8''6''6''6''8''6''6''8'' 6''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''6''6''12' '12''6''4''4'' 6''6''8''12''12''12''12''12'' 6'' 8''8''6'' 8''8''8''8''8''8'' 6''6''10''12''8'' 6'' 6'' 6''8''8''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 4''8''8''8''8''8'' 6''6'' 6'' 6''8''8''8''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''10'' 12'' 1 2 ''12''12''12''12''10''10''6'' 8''8'' 10''12''12''12''12'' 6''8''8''8'' 8''8''10''6''6''8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10''8''6''10''10''6''6''6''6''6''6''10''10''8 ''6''8''10'' 6''6''6''6''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''6'' 8''8''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''8''8''8'' 8'' 6'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6''6'' 6''6''6''6''6'' 8'' 8'' 8 '' 6''6'' 6''6''8'' 8''8''6''6''6 ''6''6'' 8''8''8'' 6'' 6'' 6'' 6''8''8''6''6''6'' 6''8' ' 8'' 10'' 1 0 '' 10''6''6''6''8' '8''8''6''6''8''8''4''4''6'' 6'' 6'' 6''6''8''8''10'' 6''6''6'' 6''8''8''8''8''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 6''6'' 6''6''6''6''8''8'' 10''10''6''6''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8 '' 6''6''16''16''16''12''12''12''10''10''10''WM7 WM8 WM4 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated KingCounty (O utsideUGA) City of Kent RetailWater Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Zone 308 Zone 339 Zone 366 Zone 368 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Water Main 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main TacomaTransmission Main City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 -PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-4 CIP-DOWNTOWN_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-4 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - Downtown Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Green River GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG CIP F7: GuibersonReservoir Replacement 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 CIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating #*UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT !(W !(W !(W !(W240 ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONEHILLTOP PRVZONE 590ZONE84THAVES68THAVES 100THAVESE208TH ST 216TH ST212THWAYSHATTUCKPLS 97THAVES202ND ST TALBOTPLS231 STST100THAVESELAKEA VES 99THAVES228TH ST TALBOT RD S93RDAVES49 T HS T 2 0 4TH PL 91STWAYS200THPL229 T HPL50THSTWESTVALLEYHWY SR1679 8 THAVES213TH ST 2 20TH PL 2 1 8 T H P L 207T H PL 228TH ST94THAVES 203RD ST 21 3 THPLMORRISAVES 220TH ST 51ST S T 43RD ST 94THAVES224TH ST 2 1 4 T H PL 96TH WAY S212TH ST 101STAVESE48TH ST 94THPLS92NDAVES91ST CT S 214THST OAKESD AL E AVE SW 222ND ST95TH PL S232ND ST 98TH PL SE 210TH PL 220TH ST 192ND ST 181ST ST LIND AVE SW 200TH ST 199TH ST 202ND S T CENTRALAVEN204T H ST 220TH L N 205TH PL 92NDAVESGLACIER ST 216TH PL 95TH CT SDAVIS PL S 230TH ST72NDAVES191ST PL 95THAVESSR 16790THWAY SRAMP2 1 8 T H S T 100THPL S ELAKEPLSSPERRY DR64THAVES66THAVES196TH ST 95THAVESTODD BLVD 192ND PL SMITHERS AVE S 99TH PL S220TH ST80THAVES 198TH PL 210TH ST EAST VAL LEY RD 193RD PL 227TH PL 96THAVES226TH PL96THPLS225THPL 209TH ST 78THAVES1 8 2 N D S T 51 S T CT67THAVES224TH ST 85TH PL S97TH PL S212TH ST 194TH ST 227THST 211TH S T 97THAVES2 0 3 R DPL 194TH ST 95TH PL S96THAVES98THAVES206TH PL 46 T H PL 72NDAVES200TH ST 98THPLS91STPLS47TH ST 180TH ST 81STAVES85THAVES190TH ST 90THPLS86THAVES84TH PL SRIVERSIDEDR 50TH PL 180TH ST 53RD PL 192ND ST 194TH ST 216TH ST 231ST ST NOVAK LN 193RD ST 45TH PL 91ST PL SE1 96TH PL 207TH CTCASCADEAVES 2NDAVEN208TH ST 99THPLS88TH PL S88THAVES93RDPLS70THAVESDAVISAVESOLYMPICAVES86TH PL SC A RRRD90THAVES206TH ST 219TH ST 184TH ST 83RD AVE S RAMP89TH AVE S70THAVES64THAVES 98TH PL S198TH ST 216TH ST77THAVES6 6 T HAVES190TH ST 187TH ST 188TH ST 85THAVES222ND ST 204TH ST 87THAVESEAST VALLEY HWY S6THAVEN4THA V E NANDOVERPARKW 208TH ST SR 16788THAVES80THPLS76THAVES16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''1 6 ''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 18''18''18''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''10''10''16''16''6''8''8 '' 10''10''10'' 10''10''10''8''10''12''8''8''8''8''12''12''8''8''8'' 10''8'' 8'' 10'' 8''8''8''12'' 12'' 8''10''10'' 10''10'' 6'' 1 2 ''12''8'' 8''10''6''8'' 8''8''12''12''12''2''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''10''10''10''1 0 '' 1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 8''8'' 10'' 10''10''10''10''10''8''8' ' 10''10''8''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''8''10''10'' 12''12'' 10''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''10''10''10''10''1 0 ''8''10''8''10''1 2 ''12''12''8''10''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''8 ''8''8''8''8'' 10'' 10''8''8''8''8''8''12''12'' 8''12''8''10'' 10''10''10''6''8''8 '' 8'' 8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 10''10''10''10'' 1 0 ''10'' 8'' 10''10''10''6'' 8'' 8''8''8''8'' 10''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''10''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2'' 1 2 ''12''12''12'' 10'' 8 '' 6''8''8''8''10''1 0 '' 8''6''8''12''12''12''12''10''10 '' 8''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12'' 8'' 10''10'' 12''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''10''1 0''10''10''8''12''12''12''12''12''12' ' 1 0 '' 1 0 ''10''6'' 8'' 1 2 ''12''12''8''12''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''8''8''10''10''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 6'' 8''8''8''8''6''10''10''10''10''8'' 8'' 12''12''12'' 10''16''6''10' ' 12'' 8''16''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 1 6 '' 1 6 '' 1 6 ''10''8''8'' 10'' 8'' 8'' 8 '' 8 '' 10''12''12''12''12''10''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8''10''8'' 16''16''16''16''16'' 16''16''16''12''12''12''12''12''16''8'' 12''8''8''8''8''14''8'' 10''8''10''10'' 10'' 10''10''10' ' 1 0 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''10''10' '10' '10' '10' '10' '10' '10''10' '10' ' 8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''8''8''10''8''8''8''8''10'' 8''8''10''10''10''10''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12'' 10''10''10''10''8''8'' 10''10''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''10''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''8'' 8''8''8'' 10''10'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''3''3''3'' 10''10''10''10' '10' '10''10''10''10''10'' 10''10'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''FFWM5 FFWM10 FFWM6FFWM4 FFWM9 N DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities UT Reservoir !(W Well !(S Spring ")I Intertie Íi Pump Station #*PRV Water Main 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-5 CIP-NORTH 240_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: RWITHERS PLOT DATE: JUN 14, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-5 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 600 1,200300 Feet 1 inch = 600 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th Street Treatment Plant Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir O'Brien Well CIP F8: Garrison/O’BrienTreatment Plant 590 ZONE 485ZONE 485ZONE 640 ZONE 262ND PL 116THAVESE256TH ST 227TH PL 251ST ST 249TH ST 1 1 4 T H WA Y S E 264TH ST100THAVESE237TH PL 240TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE97THAVES112THAVESE1 0 9 T H A V E S E 238 T HST 124THAVESE105THAVESE263RD ST108THAVESE222NDCT 117THAVESE108THAVESE252ND ST 114THAVESE100THAVESE237THPL 223R D P L 104THAVESE2 5 0 T H C T 122NDAVESE2 3 2NDST104THAVESE96THPLSC A N Y O N D R S E 256TH PL 121ST PL SE229 THPL117TH PL SE118TH PL SE1 1 9 T HPL SE 240THP L 106THAVESE248TH ST 2 6 1 S T S T 230TH ST 251ST PL 234TH ST 258TH ST 253RD PL 112TH PL SE 127THAVESE115THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110THP L S E 224TH ST 235TH ST 261ST ST 224TH PL 99THAVES2 5 3 R D S T 2 29TH ST107TH PL SE120TH PL SE244TH ST 118THPLSE126THAVESE120THAVESEKENT-KANGLEY RD 2 30TH PL 111THPLSE119THAVES E 223RD ST 1 1 9 T H D R S E98THAVES 264T H PL99TH PL S123RDAVES E 247TH PL 110TH PL SE125TH PL SE250TH PL 246T H PL 11 0 THPLSE252ND PL 228T H C T 244TH CT 124TH PL SE1 26THPLSE118TH AVE SE 236TH ST 120THAVESE239TH ST 122NDPLSE263RDCT 23 6 THP L 242ND PL 264TH ST 126THPLS E262ND C T 228TH ST 233RD ST 261ST PL112THAVESE260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE222ND PL 1 2 7THAVESE255THPL 227THST123RD PL SE233R DST110THAVESE249TH PL 232N D ST102NDC TSE266TH PL 222ND ST 125THPLSE98TH PL S118THCTSE98TH PL SE 2 2 3 R D D R 1 0 1 S T P L S E 2 5 3 R D C T 254T H C T117THAVESE103RD AVE SE 117TH PL SE113THAVESE257TH ST 238TH PL 252ND ST 255TH PL 1 0 8 T H P L S E 128TH PL SE124TH AVE SE 106THAVESE241ST PL 248 T H P L 229TH PL 262ND PL 260TH ST 246THPL 254TH PL WOODLAND WAY S 2 2 6 TH S T 232ND PL 263R D P L 128THAVESE225TH ST 123RDPLSE127THCTSE112TH PL SE1 0 9 THCT S E102NDAVESE105TH PL SE123RDAVESE25 9 T H S T 232ND ST 258TH PL 226TH S T 265THCT109THPLSE125THAVES E108TH PL SE265TH PL112THPLSE 254TH ST 245TH PL 110 TH A VESE11 9 T H AVESE24 4 T H P L 122ND PL SE113THAVESE243RD ST 109TH PL SE241ST ST 119THWAYSE235TH ST 109THAVESE23 9TH P L 102NDPLSE126TH PL SE260TH PL115THPLSE 124THAVESE236TH PL 97THP L S 98THPLS228TH P L 12 2 NDA V E SE 228 T H P L 231STST 117THAVESE226TH PL 2 23RDL N237TH PL 248TH PL266TH ST 235THPL 267TH ST 102ND PL SE115THAVESE234TH PL 225TH CT227THST 251ST PL 107TH AVE SE 238TH ST 236TH ST 102NDPLSE108THAVESE101STAVE SE259TH PL 222ND PL 250TH P L 235TH P L 113THPLSE119THPLSE103RDAVESE104TH PL SE1 2 5 TH PL SE105THPLSE259TH ST 239TH ST 100THPL SE231ST ST 258TH PL 97THAVESBENSON RD SE111TH PL SE114THLNSE2 3 3RD PL 114THAVESE242ND ST101STAVESE127THPL SE107THAVESE106THPLSE237TH ST 101ST PL SE114THPLSE123RDPLSE106THPLS E 1 2 6 THAVESE98THA V E S 225TH PL 111THAVESE2 3 1 S T P L WOODLAND WAY 1 0 0 T H P L S E 8''8''8''8''8''8''12''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 6''6''8''6''16''16'' 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''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''8 '' 8''6''8' '8''6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''4''8 ''6'' 8''8'' 8'' 6''6'' 8''6''8''21''21'' 2 1''21' ' 21''21'' 6'' 8''8''6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 12''6''6''6'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6'' 8'' 8''8''8''6''24''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 18''18''18''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6'' 8''8''8''8''12''12''12''6''2''6''6''6''6''6''6''6''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''6''6'' 8'' 6'' 8''8''8''6'' 8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8 ''8'' 8''10''8''8' ' 8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 6''8''8''1 2 ''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8' ' 8''8''6''6''24'' 24'' 24''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8''8' ' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''6''6''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''6''6''8''8 ''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 6''6'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 6''6'' 8''8''8'' 8''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 6 ''6''6''6''6''6'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''18''18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6'' 6''6''6''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''16''16''16'' PZ2 PZ2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-6 CIP-EAST HILL-NORTH_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-6 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan East Hill - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Blue B oy Standpipe 640 Tank 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 CIP F4: Proposed640 Zone BPS #1 East Hill Well Seven Oaks Well CIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 485ZONE 640ZONE99TH PL S256TH ST 251ST ST 249TH ST 264TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE273 R DPL 258TH ST 124THAVESE290TH ST106THAVESE 270TH ST 263 R D ST279THP L 268TH ST 269TH ST 121ST PL SE11 0 T H P L SE280TH ST 262ND PL 2 5 0 T H C T 274TH ST116THAVESE 122NDAVESE256TH PL 112THAVESE123RD PL SE2 6 1 S T S T 251ST PL 4 9 T H S T N E2 7 8TH PL 253RD PL 120THAVESE112TH PL SE 122NDAVESE279TH ST 114THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110 T H P L S E 271ST ST252NDPL 11 9 THAVESE276TH PL 261ST ST 117TH PL SE272ND ST112THAVESE253RDST 276TH ST 120THPLSE29 2 N D S T118THPLSE252ND ST 119TH DR SE 264TH P L 266TH PL99TH PL S109THPLSE124THPLSE126THAVESE280 T H ST 121STAVESE250TH PL 252NDP L 124TH PL SEP I KESTNE118THWAYSE1 1 5 T HA V E SE 122NDPLSE270TH PL 43RD ST NE 292NDWAY 264TH ST 109THPLS E 126THPLS E262ND C T261ST PL260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE122 N D P L SE112THAVESE255THPL 1 2 1 S T W A Y S E 2 6 6TH PL 117THCTS E 42NDST N E272ND ST 276TH WAY125THPLSE281ST STOC T NE 98TH PL S108THAVESE1 2 2 N D W A Y S E105THAVESE120THWAYSE2 5 3 R D C T 105TH AVE SE 254T H C T 117TH PL SE257TH ST 252ND ST 255TH PL 102NDAVESE106THAVESEQ ST NE 118TH C TSE295TH ST 2 9 1 S T S T 111THAVESE262ND PL 266TH CT 293RD ST 5 1 S T ST NE 288TH ST107THPLSE260TH ST 277TH ST105TH PL SE254TH P L 273RD C T 272ND PLWOODLANDWAY S 277TH PL 127THAVESE114THAVESE26 3 R D P L 122NDPLSE1 0 9 T HC T S E 293R D S T 257TH PL 25 9 T H S T 258TH PL 103RDAVESE265THCT 265TH PL 121ST PL SE254TH ST R ST NE122ND PL SE113THAVESE256TH ST 268TH ST 116THAVESEC A N Y O N D R S E 5 0 T H S T N E 109THAVESE292ND ST267TH PL 123RDPLSE260TH PL 9 7 T H P L S 2 7 4 T H S T 283RD ST 120THPLSE248TH PL 266TH ST104THAVESE106THAVESE 275TH ST102ND PL SE116TH PL SE125THAVESE273RD PL 251ST PL 275TH P L101STA VE SE259THPL 250TH P L 288TH PL119THPLSE110THAVESE286TH PL105THPLSE259THST118THAVESE 107THAVESE282ND ST 258TH PL 122NDAVESE123RDAVESE270TH PL97T H AVES111THAV E SE126TH PLSE KENT-KANGLEY RD 277TH S T 114THLNSE123 R D W A Y S E111TH PL SE107THAVESE106THPLSE123RDPLSE286TH PL 267TH ST 276TH S T 290TH PL 117THAVESE1 2 6 THAVESE9 8 T HA V E S 109THAVESE289TH ST 294TH ST 286TH ST111THAVESEGREENRIVERRD 290TH PL 1 0 0 T H P L S E 287TH ST108THAVESEW O O D L A N D W A Y 284TH ST GREENRIVERRDSE18''18''18''18''18''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''1 0 '' 10''10''10''8''8''8''8''8''1 0 ''24''24''24''2''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''18''18''6''6''8''8 '' 8'' 24'' 10''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''6''8'' 2 ''8''8''8''8 ''6''6''6''8''8''10''8''8'' 8'' 8 ''12''12''12''12''10'' 2'' 2''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 6''6' ' 8'' 8''8''8''8''2''8''8''6'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8 '' 8'' 6''6''8''10''10''10''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''10''8''10''10''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 8''12'' 8 ''10'' 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8''8''8''6''6''6''6''12''8''8''8''12''6''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''6'' 8''6''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8 ''8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''18' ' 18''18''18''8 '' 8'' 6'' 8 ''6''8''8''8''8''8''8 ''4''3''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8'' 6''6''6''6''6''6''6''8''8'' 21'' 21''21''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''6''6''12''8''8''8''8''8''8 '' 8''8''8''6''6''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8''6''8''24''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''6''2''4'' 4'' 4'' 8''8''8''8''18''8''8''8'' 8''10''8''8''8''8''8''8 ''8''1 2 ''6''6''6''6''4''4''6''6''6''8''8'' 8''8''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''10''8''8''8' ' 8''8'' 8'' 8''8'' 12''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8' ' 12''12'' 8''8''8''12''12''12''12''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''6''6''8''8 ''8''6''6''8''8 ''6''6''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8 ''8''8''6'' 6''10''10''10''10'' 8''8'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 31'' 3 1'' 3 1'' 3 1'' 31''31''31''31''31'' 31'' 31''31' '8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8''31''31''31''31''31''31'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 18''18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18''8''8''8''24''24''24''6''6''6'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21''10''10''10''10''PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM13 WM12 W M 11 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Tr ansmission Main City-Ident ified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-7 CIP-EAST HILL-SOUTH_WMANDHONLY.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-7 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan East Hill - South Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derivedfrom the City of Kent Geographic Inform ationSystem. It was designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is not guaranteed to surveyaccuracy. This map is based on the bestinformation available on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this m ap, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is owned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Seven Oaks Well 3.5 MG Tank Tacoma POD #3 CIP F5: Proposed640 Zone BPS #2 640 Tank Transmission Main From:Armstrong Springs WellsClark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1 Hydraulic Profile for the City of Kent Date:Filename:KEN\117-100\CAD\KEN-HPP.DWGMarch 11, 2019 Water System Plan Legend 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 368 Weiland Zone 354.5 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 416 Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone Booster Pump Station Pressure Reducing Station Facilities at Same Site Intertie Figure 9-8: Proposed System with 20-Year Improvements 366 Stetson Zone 640 Zone 587 Zone 200' 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 416 Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 300' 400' 500' 600' 700' 200' 300' 400' 500' 600' 700' 100' Pump Station #7 (500 gpm) Cambridge Tank 0.3 MG Ground Elev: 441' Base Elev: 499.1' Overflow Elev: 529' Diameter: 53.33' P 42nd Ave PRV P Pump Station #4 (3,800 gpm) 125K Tank 0.125 MG Ground Elev: 386.8' Base Elev: 462' Overflow Elev: 485' Diameter: 32' Reith Road Standpipe 1.0 MG Base Elev: 315' Overflow Elev: 354.5' Diameter: 66' P WEST HILL Guiberson Reservoir 3.0 MG Base Elev: 221.5' Overflow Elev: 240' Diameter: Variable Seattle PRV Stetson PRV Alvord PRV O' Brien Well (243 gpm) P P 208th Street/212th Street Wellfield (3,500 gpm) Woodland Way PRV 6 MG #1 Reservoir 6.0 MG Base Elev: 370' Overflow Elev: 418' Diameter: 146' Pump Station #5 (6,925 gpm) 234th PRV P East Hill Well (1,900 gpm) Garrison Creek Well (500 gpm) 3.5 MG Tank 3.5 MG Base Elev: 483.4' Overflow Elev: 592.9' Diameter: 74' Seven Oaks Well (350 gpm) Blue Boy Standpipe 0.97 MG Base Elev: 499.7' Overflow Elev: 593.8' Diameter: 42' EAST HILL 354.5 Zone Hilltop PRV Weiland PRV 6 MG #2 Reservoir 6.0 MG Base Elev: 211.5' Overflow Elev: 240' Diameter: Variable P Clark Springs (5,400 gpm) Clark Springs Transmission Main Kent Springs Transmission Main P Kent Springs (3,680 gpm) P Armstrong Springs Wells (1,050 gpm) Tacoma Public Utilities Tacoma POD #3 (to 590 Zone) 894' Tacoma POD #3 (to KSTM) City of Tukwila Emergency Intertie P PS #5 PRV Soos Creek Water District Emergency Intertie P City of Auburn Emergency Intertie City of Renton Emergency Intertie 640 Tank 4.0 MG Base Elev: 523' Overflow Elev: 640' Diameter: 75' Highline Water District Emergency Intertie Check Valve 218th Street PRV Lake Meridian Water District Emergency Intertie 212th Street Treatment Plant PS #4 PRV P P Clark Springs Transmission Main P P Kent Springs Transmission Main P Tacoma POD #1 (Kent Springs) P P P P P P P 6 MG #1 Reservoir to 6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main PS #5 590/485 PRV Check Valve CSTM/KSTM Intertie CSTM/KSTM Intertie 590/KSTM Intertie 590/CSTM Intertie @ 114th Valve Station Pump Station #6 (1,200 gpm) PS #6 Check ValvePS #7 Check Valve Military Rd Check Valve 590 Zone Pump Station #3 (1,800 gpm) P Pump Station #8 (1,200 gpm) P Totem PRV CIP F2: West Hill Reservoir 5.5 MG Ground Elev: 435' Base Elev: 435' Overflow Elev: 587' Diameter: 78' CIP F1: West Hill BPS (2,000 gpm) 640 Zone CIP F4: 640 Zone BPS #1 (5,250 gpm) P CIP F5: 640 Zone BPS #2 (5,250 gpm) P CIP PZ2: Multiple PRV Stations Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMIL ITARYRDSJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TITUSST192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST KENT-DESMOI NE S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN R D24THAVES228THST 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KA N G L E Y RD 104THAVESE2 1 8TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST 112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 T H S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242ND ST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEASTVALLEY HWYSINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEPZ2 WM7 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM5 WM10 WM3 WM6 PZ2 WM4 WM13 WM9 PZ1 WM12 WM8 W M 11 WM2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Unincorporated KingCounty (O utside U GA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Facilities Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Intertie PRV Water Main Distribution Main Transmission Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Distribution SystemReplacement Projects toMeet 2019 DesignCriteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-9 CIP-WATER MAIN-ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: WGS 1984 WEB MERCATOR AUXILIARY SPHEREVicinity Map City of KentCity of KentWater Main Projects System-wide2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Inform ation System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express w ritten authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This m aterial is ow ned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue BoyStandpipe0.97 MG GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG #2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Tacoma POD #3 Lak eMeridian Armstrong SpringsWells City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped)Figure 9-9Transmission Main From:Clark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1Cambridge Tank0.3 MG 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5 ZONE 529 ZONE 587 ZONE 23 0 T HST232ND ST 40THAVES24TH PL SLAKESIDEBLVDW KENT-D E S M OIN E S R D 272ND ST 2 7 T H P L S 228TH ST 236T HP L 235TH ST 55T H AVES56THPLS50THAVES55THPLS21STAVES 2 3 3 R D ST 273RD S T 48TH AVE S33RDAVES254THST 237TH PL 27THAVESHAMPTON WAY 47TH PL S270TH ST 2 3 1 S T PL 260TH ST 2 5 7 T H S T41STAVES 271ST S T 53RDPLS259THLN30THAVES 262ND ST LAKE FENWICK RD S236TH S T 234TH S T 251ST PL 259TH PL 254TH ST26TH PL S3 6 T H AVES269TH ST 272ND ST 26 8TH PL CARNABYW A Y 2 3 4T H PL51ST PL S 253RDST 232ND S T 2 3 2ND P L 242ND ST 2 4 T HA VES51STPL S 5 1 S T AVES 24T H PL S250TH ST24THAVES 254TH PL HIGHLAND AVE31STAVES253RD PL 36THPLS250TH PLI-5 FWY2 6 0TH LN 252ND ST 243RD ST 42ND PL S23RDPLS43RD CT S36THLNSAVONCT255TH ST 268TH ST 246TH ST 39TH PL S245TH CT 2 5 6 T H P L 232N D PL35THLNS244TH ST 242ND ST 51STCTS37THAVES32ND PL S32ND PL S43RDAVES256TH ST34THAVES 29THAVES46THAVE S 246TH PL 35THAVES258TH PL 258TH ST 257TH PL 256TH PL 262ND PL 42NDAVESPACIFIC HWY S2 5 9 T H C T 231ST ST 27TH AVE S I-5FWY42NDAVES253RD PL 236TH ST 22ND PL S 30THAVES39THAVES23RD PL S252ND PL 254TH CT 44TH PL S240TH ST 36THPLS239TH ST F E N W I C K C T 45TH PL S252ND PL 45THAVES56TH AVE S 36THAVESS T R A T T F ORDCT 41ST PL S25THAVES24 8 T H P L 241ST ST SAXONCT247TH S T PRINCETONAVE 24TH AVE S 31STAVES250TH ST 234TH ST MILITARY RD S33RD PL S255TH PL 35THPLS252ND ST 258 T HPL 271ST PLMILITARYRDS32NDAVES249TH ST KENTCT 251ST ST23RD PL S2 7 0 TH ST 33RD PL S42NDPLSSOMERSET LN38THAVES243RD ST BRISTOLCTM EE K E R S TCAMBRIDGE DRDOWNING AVE SO MER SET CT236THST43RDAVES261ST ST 249TH ST 248TH ST 272ND W A Y42NDPLSI-5FWYARDENCT272ND PL HAMPTONCT26THPLS 233RD PL 229TH PL 253RD ST 28THAVESRAMP265TH ST27THAVES25THLNS CANTE RBUR Y LN23RDAVES26THAVESREITH RDRIVERVIEW BLVD S 238TH ST28THAVES25THAVES 251STST 26THAVES5 2 N D A V E S 4 8 T HPLS38THAVES261ST PL CARDIFF AVEV E T E R A N S D R 260TH ST 23 9 THPL54THAVES248TH ST 46THAVES47TH AVES4 5 T H P L S RUSS E L L RDS 35TH PL SRAMP 263RDST35THAVESFRAGERRDSKENT - D E S MO IN E S R D S 52ND LN SFRAGERRD S 8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''16''16''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8 '' 8 ''8''8''8''8 '' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8'' 6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''6''6''6''8''8''8''6''6''8'' 8''12''12''16''16'' 6''6''6''8''12' ' 12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''16''1 6''16''16''16''16''16''1 6'' 1 6''16''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''16''6''6 ''6' '6''12'' 6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''6''6'' 6'' 6 ''6''6''6''8''6'' 12''12''8 ''8''8'' 6'' 6''8''8''12''6''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8' ' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''16''12'' 12'' 12'' 8 ''8''8''8'' 8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8''8''6''16'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''1 6''16' '16''16''16''16''16''8'' 6''6''8''8' ' 8''8''8''8'' 6'' 6'' 8 ''8''6''6''8''8''8''6''6''1 6'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''8''8'' 6'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6''6''8'' 1 0 '' 1 0 ''10''8''8''12''12''8''8 '' 8''8''8'' 6'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''6 ''8' ' 6 ''8 ''8'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''6''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''16''16''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''8''12' ' 6 ''4''6''12'' 12'' 6''6'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8'' 4'' 6'' 6''6''8'' 2'' 6''8''8''8' '8''12''12'' 12''12''12''12' '8''8''8''6'' 8'' 12''6''12''12''12' '6''6''12''12''12''12 '' 6'' 6 '' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8 ''6''6''8 ''8''8''6'' 8'' 8''8''6''8''6 ''6''8''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6 ''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''8''8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''6''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''6'' 8'' 8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''12''12''8''8''8''8'' 2'' 2'' 2'' WM3 PZ1 WM2 4 2 5 1 3 3 3 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-10 CIP-WEST HILL_WM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-10 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan West Hill Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. LakeFenwick Green River Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #8 Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Pump Station #6 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5ZONE WASHINGTONAVEN236TH ST 38THAVESLAKE SID E BLVDW 235TH ST 233RD ST 55T H AVES56THPLS60THCTS50THAVES55THPLS61ST PL S237 TH PL JAMESP L 62NDWAYS 6 4 T H A V E S38THPLS2 3 1S T PL K E N T -D E S M O I N E S RD S45THAVES41STAVES238TH PL53RDPLS40THPLS226THST RAMP42ND PL S251STPL JAMES LN215TH P L44THPLS59T H PL S 215TH S T 63RD WAY S 2 3 4T H PL42NDAVES41STPLS36THAVES232ND S T 23 2 N D PL218THPL 242ND ST 63RDAVES217TH ST 220THPL 237T H ST 242ND PL214TH WAY5 1 S T AVES LAKESIDEBLVDE67TH PL S43RDPLS66THAVES51STAVES238 T HSTMORTON ST K E N T -D E S M O INES RD 236TH PL 245TH CT 46THPLS239TH ST 209TH PL 232N D C T 58TH AVES 61STAVES53RDPLS225THPL RI VERVIEWBLVDS51STCTS43RDAVES220T HST 62ND PL S223RD ST 234TH ST39THWAYS216TH PL 65THAVES211T HPL39THAVES60THAVES221ST PL WEST V A L L E Y H WY S42NDAVES3 5THPLSWASHINGTONAVES221STS T 57TH AVE S JAMES CT JAMES ST56THAVES239THST64THAVES 24 8 T H P L 241ST ST 41STAVESMEEKER ST 62NDAVES53RDAVES54THAVES247TH S T KENT-DESMOI NESRDS250TH ST 46TH AVE S 234TH ST 214TH PL 210TH ST 209TH ST 67THAVES211TH S T 38THAVES243RD ST 222NDP L236 T H ST SMITH CT 249TH ST 248TH ST 42NDPLS224TH PL 2 1 6 T H S T 35TH PL S4 6 THAVES233RD PL SM ITH ST 212TH ST 3 7 T H P L S 40THAVES58TH PL S59TH PL S40 THWAYS41STPLS68THAVESMI L I TARYRDSMILITARY RD S50THAVES238TH ST 216TH ST 231ST ST 224TH ST 2 4 9 T H S T43RDAVES240TH ST212THST 228TH S T 208TH ST V E T E R A N S D R RIDGE VIEWDR52ND WAY S35THAVES2 12TH CT 62NDAVES23 9 THPL45THAVE S 2 5 1 S T S T 220T H S T 2 2 6 T H S T 219TH ST REITHR D 4 5 T H P L S39THPLS 66THAVES42NDAVESORILLI ARDSF R A G E R R D SRUSSELL RD SFRAG E R RDS FRAGERRDSRUS S ELLRDS FRAGERRD S 16'' 16'' 16'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''8''12 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8'' 12'' 8''8''8'' 6''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''16''16''16''16''6''6''16''12''12''12''6''12'' 12''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 '' 1 6''16''16''16''16''16''1 6''16''8''8'' 6'' 12''12''6 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 12 ''12''12''12''12'' 12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''8 ''8' '8''8''16''16''16''12''12''12''12''12 '' 12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12'' 8''16''16''16''12''16''12''12''12''8''8''8 '' 12''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''8''1 6''16' ' 1 6''16' ' 10'' 12'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''10''12''12''6''12' ' 8'' 8''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12 ''12''12''8' '8''8'' 1 2 ''12''12''6''6''8'' 8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''1 0 ''8''8 ''10'' 10'' 8''8''1 6 ''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''12''12''12''12''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8'' 1 0 '' 8''10''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 12'' 1 2'' 8'' 8'' 8''12''8'' 10'' 8''8''8''8''10''12''10''10''10''10''8''8' ' 8 '' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8''12''10''8''8''6''8''10''8''8 ''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8 '' 8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''8 '' 8'' 8 ''8''12''8''8''8''6''8''8''8'' 8'' 10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''8''6''8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8''12''12''12''8''10''8 '' 8''6''6'' 8'' 8''8'' 1 2 '' 1 2 ''12''12''8'' 8'' 6''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''6''12''12''12''12'' 1 2'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6 '' 8'' 8 ''8''8'' 8 ''8''12' '8''8'' 8'' 1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''8''10'' 8''8''8'' 8''10''10'' 8''12'' 12'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2''12''12'' 8 ''10''10''12''12''12''12''6'' 8''12''12''12''8'' 8'' 1 0 ''1 0 ''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8 ''10''1 0 ''10''8''10''8''8'' 6''8''8''14''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 10'' 10''10'' 2'' 2'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''12''12'' 8''8'' 12''12''8 ''8''8''8'' 8''8' '8''8''8''8''1 0 ''10'' 8''8'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''WM2 WM2 23 16 16 5 11 15 12 10 10 10 WM5 WM4 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-11 CIP-WEST 240_WM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-11 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - West Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent.Green RiverPumpStation #3 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 590ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONE 308 ZONE 366ZONE 271 ZONE 368 ZONE 339 ZONE JAMES ST88THAVES 242ND S T MEEKER ST VANDEVANTERAVE94THAVESCENTRALAVENJAMES ST KENT-DES MOINES RD S 277TH ST W O O D L A N D W A Y SR 1675THAVESWALN UT ST4THAVENWILLIS ST 266TH ST SCENIC WAYG O W E S T TITUSSTGUIBERSON ST CREST AVESR 167262ND PLJAMES LNGARFIELD AVERAMPWILLIS ST SEATTLE ST5THAVENKENSINGTONAVESSTATEAVEN 87THAVES252ND ST CARTER PL67TH PL S251STST 2 38THST HILLCRESTAVE233RD P L WASHINGTONAVESGOWE S T R E IT E N R D SUMMITAVENWO O D L A N D WA Y 6TH AVE N CENTRALAVES2NDAVENSTATEAVES240T H S T 248T H ST WALNUT ST 232NDST 237T H P L FILBERT ST 238TH PL HEMLOCK ST OLYMPICWAY TEMPERANCE ST CEDAR ST DEAN ST7THAVEN MO RTON STMADISON AVERUSSEL LSTTHOMPSON AVE3RDAVESKENNEBECKAVEN2NDAVES1STAVES94THAVES79THAVESSTATEAVENCLOUDY ST C A N Y O N D R S E SMITH ST CROW ST SAAR ST 97THAVES96THAVES96THAVESJASONAVENSTETSO N AVE ALVORDAVE242ND CT IVES AVESEATTLE PL 277TH ST EAST LN234T H PL RAMSAYWAYHAWL E Y RD BRIDGESAVES244TH P L CHICAGO ST6THAVESRAILROADAVES 2NDAVESHAZELAVEN2 4 0 T H P L 1STAVES2 4 3 R D S T KENSINGTON AVE258THPL WESTVIEWCTWOODFORDAVEN W E ILA NDST WATERMAN ST MAPLE ST MARION STWASHINGTONAVEN71ST PL S241ST STSAM ST HARRISON ST CHE RRY HIL L ST266TH ST 2 3 9TH S T 261 ST ST SMITH ST 97TH PL S239TH ST 245TH PL 246TH PLKENNEBECKAVE NRAILROADAVEN6THAVENJAMES PL 68THAVESHARRISO N ST 261STST3RDAVEN1STAVEN2NDAVENALDER LN68THAVESNOVAKLN 259TH ST 97T H AVES78THAVESWYNW OODDRKENOS IAAVE80THAVESALPIN EWAY C E N T R A L PLSTIL D E N AVE2 3 1 STST 259TH ST RIDGE V IE WDRSR 1671STAVENLENORAAVENPROSPECTAVEN235T H PL RAMP84THPLS91STAVESMACLYN ST 262ND ST 234TH ST 272ND ST MAPLEWOOD AVELAUREL STRAMP MAPLE STALVORDAVEN5THAVES235THPLHILLTOPAVEN MAPLE LNFRAGERRDS 262ND ST GREENRIVERR DNADENAVES72NDAVESHAWLEY RDEAST VALLEY HWY S74THAVES94TH PL S1 2 ''12''12''12''8''12''24''24''2 4'' 16''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 6''8''8''8''8''8''12''1 2 ''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''21'' 21'' 16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''12'' 8'' 8''8'' 1 2 ''8''6'' 12'' 16''16''12''12''12''8''8''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''8''12'' 12''12''12''12''6'' 12''12''16''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12''12''12''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''12''12'' 12''12''12''12''12''1 2'' 6''12''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''12''12''12''6''8''6''12''6''12''16''16''1 6'' 6'' 12''12''8''12''12''12''16' '16' ' 8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''6''1 2 ''12''16''16''1 2 '' 8'' 8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''12''12''12'' 8'' 8'' 8''8'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12'' 12''12''8''8'' 8''8''8''12'' 12''12''16''16''16''12''12''12''12''8''8''16''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 '' 16'' 16''10''10''10''16''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8'' 8''12''12''8''8''8 ''8''16''16''12''12''12''12''8''16''16''12''8''12''6''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''8''8'' 1 2 ''12''12''8''10''6''6''10''10''10''6''12''12'' 12''12''6''12''6'' 8''8'' 8'' 12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''8'' 8'' 8''8 ''8''6''12'' 8'' 8 ''6''24'' 8''8''8'' 1 0 ''6''8''8''24''24''24''2 4'' 24'' 2 4'' 2 4'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 8''8'' 8'' 8 '' 1 0 ''8''6''6''6''8 '' 6'' 6''6''8'' 8''8''8''8''12''1 2 ''12''8 '' 8''8''6''10''8''8''12''8''8''8 '' 16''8''8'' 12'' 8''10''1 6 '' 8'' 10'' 8''6''6''10''8''8''10''6''8''8''8''6 '' 6'' 8 '' 12''12''12'' 8'' 8 ''10''8''6''8''10''6'' 6'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''6''6''6''8''6''6''6''6'' 6''8''6 '' 12''12''8''6''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 12''12''12'' 6'' 12''8''8''6'' 8'' 6''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''12' '12''8''12''12''12''12''12'' 6''8''8'' 10''6''6''12''8'' 6''10''10''10'' 8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''12''6'' 6''6''8''8''8'' 8''8''10''6''8''8''8''8''10''10''8 ''6''8 ''8''6''6'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 6''6''8'' 8''8'' 6'' 8''8''8''8''8''6'' 6'' 6''8''8''6''6''6'' 10'' 1 0 '' 10''8''8''8''8''6''6''8'' 8''6''6''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8 '' 10'' 10''16''16''16''12''12''12''10''10''10''8''8''8''8''8'' 46 41 16 12 33 50 36 48 17 23 47 21 23 11 26 45 43 36 44 25 16 38 32 51 46 3438 34 14 52 15 46 28 20 49 24 36 18 38 31 19 7 22 10 13 45 46 10 46 35 27 29 30 42 33 46 37 39 40 39 53 46 38 10 47 6 WM7 WM8 WM4 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated KingCounty (O utsideUGA) City of Kent RetailWater Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Zone 308 Zone 339 Zone 366 Zone 368 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Water Main 240 Zone 271 Alvord Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main TacomaTransmission Main Distribution SystemReplacementProjects to Meet2019 Design Criter ia High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 -PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-12 CIP-DOWNTOWN_WATER MAIN.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-12 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - Downtown Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Green River GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 #*UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT !(W !(W !(W !(W240 ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONEHILLTOP PRVZONE 590 ZONE 205TH CT71ST PL S 100TH CT SE197TH ST 204TH CT226TH ST 2 2 1 S T P L 218THPL 91STC TS214THST OAKESD AL E AVE SW 49TH ST95TH PL S98THPLSEMORRISAVESLIND AVE SW 214TH P L 199TH ST 204T H ST 220TH L N 205TH PL 216TH P L 220T H P L 95THCTSDAVISPLS230TH ST 191ST PL 95THAVES230TH PL 228TH ST 223RD PLLAKEPLSSPERRY DRTALBOTRDS192ND PL SMITHERS AVE S 95TH PL S90THWAYS99TH PL S220TH ST 198TH PL 210TH ST EAST VAL LEY RD 193RD PL 227TH PL 2 1 0TH PL 224TH S T 226TH PL213THPL96THPLS225THPL 209TH ST 78TH AVE S 51ST CT 67THAVES43RD ST 85TH PL S1 8 2 N D S T 204THPL 227THST97THPLS202ND ST 2 0 3 R DPL 212TH ST 194TH ST GLACIER ST 2 1 3 T H ST98THAVES206TH PL 46 T H P L 91STPLS47TH ST 98THPLS97THAVES85THAVES22 9THPL86THAVES84TH PL S211TH ST 48TH S T RIVERSIDEDR 50TH PL 180TH ST 222ND ST 53RD PL 92NDAVES192ND ST TODD BLVD 93RDAVES231ST ST 216TH ST 224TH ST NOVAK LN 193RD ST 45TH PL 231STST 91ST PL SE1 96TH PL 207TH CT 194TH ST 72NDAVES50TH ST 94THAVES2NDAVEN98THAVES99THPLS88TH PL S208TH ST CASCADEAVES88THAVES93RDPLS96THAVES202ND ST 101STAVESE70THAVES86TH PL STALBOTRDSC A RRRD97THAVES90TH PL S90THAVES206TH ST 220T H ST 180TH ST 219TH ST 184TH ST 83RD AVE S70THAVES224TH ST64THAVES 84THAVES98TH PL S92NDAVESCENTRALAVEN198TH ST 84THAVES68THAVES80THAVES216TH ST66THAVES 64THAVESSR 167190TH ST 187TH ST 188TH ST 85THAVES222ND ST 204TH ST RAMP87THAVES72NDAVES6THAVEN192ND ST 4 T H A V E NANDOVERPARKW 208TH ST77THAVES 212TH WAY80THAVES72NDAVES43RD ST 88THAVES80 THPLS 76THAVESSR 167208TH ST 216T H ST 218T H STEASTVALLEYHWYS SHATTUCKPLS 203RD STTALBOT PL S200TH PL96TH WAY S207T H P L 212TH ST 96THAVES95THAVES232ND ST66THAVES81STAVES94THPLS91STWAYS228TH ST 99THAVES200TH STOLYMPICAVES 100THAVESERAMPDAVISAVESSR 167190TH ST 194TH ST 68THAVESRAMPSR167200TH ST 196TH ST 16''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12.6''16''16'' 16'' 12''12''16''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''1 6 ''12''12''1 2 ''12''12'' 16''16'' 12''16''12''12'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 16'' 16'' 12''12''12' '16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''16''12''12''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''16'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2'' 16''16''1 6 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12'' 18''18'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''1 6 ''6''6''6''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''10'' 10''10''10''8''12''8''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''12''12''8''8''8'' 10'' 8''8'' 8'' 10'' 12'' 12'' 8'' 10'' 6'' 1 2 ''12''8'' 8''10''6''8'' 8''8''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''2''8''8''8''8''8'' 10''8''8' '8''8''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''10'' 1 0 ''8''10''8''10''1 2 ''12''12''8''10''8'' 8 ''8''10''10'' 10'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 12''12''8''8''8''12''8''10'' 10'' 10''10''6'' 8'' 8 '' 8'' 8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''10''8 '' 6''10''8''12''10''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''1 0''10''8''10''12''12''12''12''8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''8''8''12''12''8''12''12''10''10''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 1 2 ''12''12''12'' 10'' 8 '' 6''8''8''6''8''12''12''12''12''8''8''12' ' 8'' 8'' 12''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''8''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12' ' 6 '' 8''8'' 1 2 ''8''12''8''10''10''10'' 8'' 8''10''10''8''10''10''8''6''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''8'' 8'' 12''12''12'' 10''16''6''10' ' 12'' 8 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 1 6 '' 1 6 '' 1 6 ''10''10' ' 8'' 8'' 8 '' 8 '' 10''12''12''12''12''8''8''8'' 8''10''12''12'' 8'' 16''16''16''16''16'' 16''16''16''12''16''8'' 12''14''8''8''10''10''10''10'' 10'' 10'' 10''10''10''10''10''10''10' ' 1 0 ''12''12''12''10' '10' '10' '10''10''10''10''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 8''8'' 8''8''10''10'' 1 0 ''8''8''12''12'' 10''10''12''12''12''12''12''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 10''10''10''10' '10' '10''10''10''10''10'' 10''10'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''12''!!9 !!9 !!8 !!9 !!42 FFWM5 FFWM10 FFWM6FFWM4 FFWM9 N DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities UT Reservoir !(W Well !(S Spring ")I Intertie Íi Pump Station #*PRV Water Main 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main Distribution System Replacement Pr ojectsto Meet 2019 D esign C riteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-13 CIP-NORTH 240_WM.MXD BY: RWITHERS PLOT DATE: JUN 14, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-13 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan 240 Zone - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 600 1,200300 Feet 1 inch = 600 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th Street Treatment Plant Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir O'Brien Well 590 ZONE 485ZONE 485ZONE 640ZONE 262ND PL 116THAVESE256TH ST 227TH PL 251ST ST 249TH ST 114TH W AY SE 264TH ST100THAVESE237TH PL 240TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE9 7 THAVES112THAVESE238 T HST 124THAVESE105THAVESE2 6 3 R D ST108THAVESE222NDC T 117THAVESE108THAVESE252ND ST 114THAVESE100THAVESE237THPL 223R D P L 104THAVESE2 5 0 T H C T 122NDAVESE2 3 2NDST244TH ST 104THAVESE96TH PL SC A N Y O N D R S E 256TH PL 121ST PL SE229 THPL117TH PL SE118TH PL SE1 1 9 T HPL SE 240THP L 106THAVESE248TH ST 2 6 1 S T S T 230TH ST 251ST PL 234TH ST 258TH ST 253RD PL 112TH PL SE 127THAVESE115THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110TH PLS E 224TH ST 235THST261ST ST 224TH PL 99THAVES2 5 3 R D S T 2 29TH ST107THPLSE120TH PL SE244TH ST 118THPLSE126THAVESE120THAVESEKENT-KANGLEY RD 2 30TH PL 111THPLSE119THAVES E 223RD ST 1 1 9 T H D R S E98THAVES 264TH PL 99TH PL S123RDAVES E 247TH PL 125TH PL SE250TH PL 246T H PL 110 T H P L S E252ND PL 228T H C T 244TH CT 124TH PL SE1 26THPLSE118TH AVE SE 236TH ST 120THAVESE122NDPLSE263RDCT 23 6 THP L 242N D PL 264TH ST 126THPLS E262ND C T 228TH ST 233RD ST 261ST PL112THAVESE260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE222ND PL 1 2 7THAVESE255THPL 227THST123RD PL SE233R DST108THAVESE110THAVESE232N D ST102NDC TSE266TH PL 222ND ST 125THPLSE98TH PL S106TH AVE SE 118THCTSE98TH PL SE 2 2 3 R D D R 1 0 1 S T P L S E 2 5 3 R D C T 254T H C T117THAVESE103RD AVE SE 117TH PL SE113THAVESE257TH ST 238TH PL 252ND ST 255TH PL 1 0 8 T H P L S E 128TH PL SE124TH AVE SE 106THAVESE241ST PL 248 T H P L 229TH PL 262ND PL 260TH ST 246THPL 254TH P L WOODLAND WAY S 2 2 6 TH S T 232ND PL 263R D P L 128THAVESE225TH ST 110THPLSE123RDPLSE127THCTSE112TH PL SE 1 0 9 THCT S E102NDAVESE105TH PL SE123RDAVESE257TH PL 25 9 T H S T 232ND ST 258TH PL 226TH S T 265THCT109THP L S E 125THAVESE108TH PL SE265TH PL112THPLSE 254TH ST 245TH PL 110 TH A VESE11 9 T H AVESE24 4 T H P L 122ND PL SE113THAVESE109THAVESE243RD ST 109TH PL SE241ST ST 119THWAYSE235TH ST 109THAVESE23 9TH P L 102NDPLSE126TH PL SE260TH PL115THPLSE 124THAVESE236TH PL 9 7 T H P L S 98THPLS228TH P L 12 2 NDA V E SE 228 T H P L 231STST 117THAVESE226TH PL 2 23RDL N237TH PL 234TH PL 266TH ST 235THPL 267TH ST 102ND PL SE115THAVESE234TH PL 225TH CT227THST 251ST PL 107TH AVE SE 238TH ST 236TH ST 102NDPLSE101STAVE SE259TH PL 222ND PL 250TH P L 235TH P L 113THPLSE119THPLSE103RDAVESE104TH PL SE1 2 5 TH PL SE105THPLSE259TH ST 239TH ST 100THPLSE231ST ST 258TH PL 97THAVESBENSON RD SE111TH PL SE114THLNSE233RD PL 114THAVESE242ND ST101STAVESE127THPL SE107THAVESE106THPLSE237TH ST 101ST PL SE114TH PL SE123RDPLSE106TH PL SE1 2 6 THAVESE225TH PL 111THAVESE2 3 1 S T P L W O O D L A N D W A Y 1 0 0 T H P L S E16''16''16''16''16'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 12'' 8''8'' 8''12''8''8' ' 8''8''8''1 2'' 12'' 12''12''12''8''12''16' '16''12'' 12''12''8''16''16''16''16''12''1 2''8''8' '12''16''16''16''16''8''8''8'' 12'' 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''6''8''8''8''6''10''10''10''8''8''6''8''12'' 8''6''8'' 8''8''10''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''8''6'' 6'' 8''6''6''8''6'' 6''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''8 ''6''8' '8''6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8'' 8 ''6'' 8''8'' 8'' 8'' 6 '' 21''21'' 2 1''21' ' 21''21'' 6'' 6'' 8''8''6'' 8'' 8 ''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 12''6''8 '' 6'' 8'' 8''8''8''6''24''8''8''8'' 18''18''18''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''8''8''6''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''6''8'' 8'' 8''8' '8''6'' 8'' 8''8'' 8''8''8 ''8''8 ''8'' 8''10''6''8''8' '8''8''8''8'' 8'' 6''8''8''1 2 ''8''8''8''8''8' ' 8'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8' ' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''6''6''8''8 ''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''6''6''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''6''6''6'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''18''18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18''6''6''6''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''16''16''16''16'' 55 55 54 PZ2 PZ2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main Distribution System Replacement Pr ojectsto Meet 2019 D esign C riteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-14 CIP-EAST HILL-WM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-14 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan East Hill - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Blue B oy Standpipe 640 Tank 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 East Hill Well Seven Oaks Well 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 485ZONE 640ZONE99TH PL S256TH ST 251ST ST 249TH ST 264TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE273 R DPL 258TH ST 124THAVESE290TH ST106THAVESE 270TH ST 263 R D ST279THP L 268TH ST 269THST 121ST PL SE11 0 T H P L SE280TH ST 262ND PL 2 5 0 T H C T 274TH ST116THAVESE 122NDAVESE256TH PL 112THAVESE123RD PL SE2 6 1 S T S T 251ST PL 4 9 T H S T N E2 7 8TH PL 253RD PL 120THAVESE112TH PL SE 279TH ST 114THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110 T H P L S E 271ST ST252NDPL 11 9 THAVESE276TH PL 261ST ST 117TH PL SE272ND ST112THAVESE253RDST 276TH ST120THPLSE 29 2 N D S T118THPLSE252ND ST 119TH DR SE 264TH P L 266TH PL99TH PL S109THPLSE124THPLSE126THAVESE280 T H ST 121STAVESE250TH PL 252NDP L 124TH PL SEP I KESTNE118THWAYSE1 1 5 T HA V E SE 122NDPLSE270TH PL 43RD ST NE 292NDWAY 264TH ST 126THPLS E262ND C T261ST PL260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE122 N D P L SE112THAVESE255THPL 1 2 1 S T W A Y S E117THCTS E 42NDST N E272ND ST 276TH WAY125THPLSE281ST STOC T NE 98TH PL S108THAVESE1 2 2 N D W A Y S E105THAVESE120THWAYSE2 5 3 R D C T 105TH AVE SE 254T H C T 117TH PL SE257TH ST 252ND ST 255TH PL 102NDAVESE106THAVESEQ ST NE 118TH C TSE295TH ST 121STPL S E 2 9 1 S T S T 111THAVESE262ND PL 266TH CT 293RD ST 5 1 S T ST NE 288TH ST107THPLSE260TH ST 277TH ST105TH PL SE254TH P L 273RD C T 1 0 9 T HAVES E272ND PLWOODLANDWAY S 277TH PL 127THAVESE114THAVESE26 3 R D P L 122NDPLSE1 0 9 T HC T S E 293R D S T 257TH PL 25 9 T H S T 258TH PL 103RDAVESE265THCT 265TH PL 254TH ST R ST NE122ND PL SE113THAVESE268TH ST 116THAVESEC A N Y O N D R S E 5 0 T H S T N E 109THAVESE292ND ST267TH PL 123RDPLSE260TH PL 9 7 T H P L S 2 7 4 T H S T 283RD ST 120THPLSE266TH ST 104THAVESE106THAVESE275TH ST102ND PL SE116TH PL SE125THAVESE273RD PL 251ST PL 275TH P L101STAVE SE259THPL 250TH P L 288TH PL119THPLSE110THAVESE286TH PL105THPLSE259THST 118THAVESE107THAVESE282ND ST 258TH PL 122NDAVESE123RDAVESE270TH PL97T H AVES111THAV E SE126TH PLSE KENT-KANGLEY RD 277TH S T 114THLNSE123 R D W A Y S E111TH PL SE107THAVESE106THPLSE123RDPLSE286TH PL 267TH ST 276TH S T 290TH PL 117THAVESE1 2 6 THAVESE9 8 T HA V E S 109THAVESE289TH ST 294TH ST 286TH ST111THAVESEGREENRIVERRD 290TH PL 1 0 0 T H P L S E 287TH ST108THAVESEW O O D L A N D W A Y 284TH ST GREENRIVERRDSE12''1 2 ''12''12''12''8''8'' 6''8''16''16''12'' 12''12''8''16''16''16''16''12''12'' 8''8'' 6 ''16''16''16''16''6''6''8''6''8''16''16''12''12'' 16''16''16''16'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12'' 1 2'' 1 2'' 12''8''8''18''18''18''18''18''18''12'' 12''8''8''6'' 12''12''8''8''8''12''16''6''16''16''16''16''12''1 2''12''8''8' '8''12''6''6''16'' 16''6''8'' 8'' 10''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8'' 12''16''8''8''8''12''12''8' ' 8''12''12''12''12''12'' 16''16''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 10'' 8''8''1 0 ''24''24''24''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''18''18'' 8''8''8''6''6''8''8 '' 8'' 24'' 8 ''16'' 8''8''8''8''10''8''8'' 8 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21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21''10''10''10''10''55 55 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM13 WM12 W M 11 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-15 CIP-EAST HILL-SOUTH_WM.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-15 City of K entCity of K ent Water Main Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan East Hill - South Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derivedfrom the C ity of Kent Geographic InformationSystem. It w as designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is not guaranteed to surveyaccuracy. This map is based on the bestinformation available on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is owned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Seven Oaks Well 3.5 MG Tank Tacoma POD #3 640 Tank Transmission Main From:Armstrong Springs WellsClark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1 Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community84THAVES 256TH ST COVINGTON-S A W YER R DPACIFICHWYSMIL ITARYRDSJAMES ST68THAVES240TH ST K ENT-DESMOINESRD 304TH STMILITARY RD SMEEKER ST 298TH ST TITUSST192ND ST 200TH ST 152NDAVESE240TH ST212THWAY 180THAVESE212TH ST JAMES ST KENT-DESMOI NE S R D S 43RD ST 277TH ST W O O D L A N D WAYCOVI NGT ONWAY S ESR 1674THAVENW AX RD260TH ST 55THAVES216TH ST 272ND ST16THAVES 3 7 TH ST NW AUBURNWAYNGOWE ST 208TH ST 223RD ST COVIN G T O N -S A W Y E R R D124THAVESE140THAVESE288TH ST259THPL 124THAVESEWAX RD116THAVESE116THAVESE222ND ST 272ND ST 132NDAVESE224TH ST 200TH ST SR18248TH ST108THAVESE188TH ST 51STAVES4THAVES1 8 8THST 148THAVESEREITEN R D24THAVES228THST 43RD ST CENTRALAVEN272ND ST 241ST STWESTVALLEYHWY 37THAVESP E TERGRU B B RDS E 304TH ST TALBOT RD SSMITH ST C A N Y O N D R S E 259TH ST 164THAVESEI-5FWY64THAVESS T A R L A K E R D CENTRALAVES144THAVESE1 9 6 THAVESE164THAVESE281ST ST108THAVESE 240TH ST 64THAVES34THAVES36THAVES216TH ST 94THAVES304TH ST S WE E NE Y R D S E 304TH ST16THAVES 196THAVESE228TH ST292ND ST SR 18I-5 FWY288TH STSR 167KENT-KA N G L E Y RD 104THAVESE2 1 8TH ST SR 167272ND ST 212TH ST 112THAVESE296TH ST 2 7 4 T H S T PETROVI TSKY RD196TH ST196TH ST WEST VALLEY HWY S204TH W AY180TH ST 42NDAVES37THPL SKENT-BLA C K DI AMONDRD S EMILITARYRDS180TH ST 267TH ST 232ND ST 68THAVESWESTVALLEYHWYNORILLIARDS192NDAVESEV E T E R A N S D R 242ND ST 65THAVES2 9 2 N D S T 4 0THPL S I-5 FWY164THPLSEREITHRD3 7 T H S T N E C A R RRD180TH ST 37TH ST NEEASTVALLEY HWYSINTERNATIONALBLVDSR 167224TH ST 35THAVESMAPLE ST16THAVES 180THAVESESOUTHCENTERPKWYI-5 FWY200TH ST 20THAVES42NDAVESG REENRIV ER R D2 7 2 NDW AY EASTVALLEYHWYSI -5FWY88THAVESTHOMASRDSE76THAVESI-5 FWYGREENRIVERRDSEPZ2 WM7 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM5 WM10 WM3 WM6 PZ2 WM4 WM13 WM9 PZ1 WM12 WM8 W M 11 WM2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALEWHEN BAR MEASURES 2” 0 2,000 4,0001,000 Feet Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King County UGA Unincorporated KingCounty (O utside U GA) City of Kent Retail WaterService Area Facilities Reservoir Pump Station Well Spring Intertie PRV Water Main Distribution Main Transmission Main Tacoma TransmissionMain Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 354.5 Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 529 Zone 575 Zone 587 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Distribution SystemReplacement Projects toMeet 2019 DesignCriteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-16 CIP-ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: WGS 1984 WEB MERCATOR AUXILIARY SPHEREVicinity Map City of KentCity of KentCapital Improvement Projects2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System PlanThis map is a graphic representationderived from the City of KentGeographic Information System. Itwas designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is notguaranteed to survey accuracy. Thismap is based on the best informationavailable on the date show n on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map,or portions thereof, is prohibitedwithout express written authorizationby the C ity of Kent. This material is owned andcopyrighted by the C ity of Kent. 1 inch = 2,000 feet StarLake P a n t h e r L a k e Lake MeridianGreenRiverGreenRiverGreen RiverEnhancementArea Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG 640 Tank4.0 MG Blue BoyStandpipe0.97 MG GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir 6 MG #1 Reservoir and Pump Station #5 125K Tank0.125 MG Pump Station #6 Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 East HillWell 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th St Treatment Plant 3.5 MG Tank Seven Oaks Well O'BrienWell Tacoma POD #3 Lak eMeridian Armstrong SpringsWells City of RentonCity of SeaTac City of D es Moines City of Federal Way City of A uburn City of Covington Pump Station #8 416 Zone: 6 MG #1 Reservoir to6 MG #2 Reservoir Transmission Main A n g le L a k e City of Tukwila CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F4: Proposed640 Zone BPS #1 CIP F5: Proposed640 Zone BPS #2 Tacoma POD #2(Undeveloped) CIP F7: GuibersonReservoir Replacement Figure 9-16All Projects, System-wideCIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating Transmission Main From:Clark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1 CIP F8: Garrison/O’BrienTreatment Plant Cambridge Tank0.3 MG 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5 ZONE 529 ZONE 587 ZONE 23 0 T HST232ND ST 40THAVES24TH PL SLAKESIDEBLVDW KENT-D E S M OIN E S R D 272ND ST 2 7 T H P L S 228TH ST 236T HP L 235TH ST 55T H AVES56THPLS50THAVES55THPLS21STAVES 2 3 3 R D ST 273RD S T 48TH AVE S33RDAVES254THST 237TH PL 27THAVESHAMPTON WAY 47TH PL S270TH ST 2 3 1 S T PL 260TH ST 2 5 7 T H S T41STAVES 271ST S T 53RDPLS259THLN30THAVES 262ND ST LAKE FENWICK RD S236TH S T 234TH S T 251ST PL 259TH PL 254TH ST26TH PL S3 6 T H AVES269TH ST 272ND ST 26 8TH PL CARNABYW A Y 2 3 4T H PL51ST PL S 253RDST 232ND S T 2 3 2ND P L 242ND ST 2 4 T HA VES51STPL S 5 1 S T AVES 24T H PL S250TH ST24THAVES 254TH PL HIGHLAND AVE31STAVES253RD PL 36THPLS250TH PLI-5 FWY2 6 0TH LN 252ND ST 243RD ST 42ND PL S23RDPLS43RD CT S36THLNSAVONCT255TH ST 268TH ST 246TH ST 39TH PL S245TH CT 2 5 6 T H P L 232N D PL35THLNS244TH ST 242ND ST 51STCTS37THAVES32ND PL S32ND PL S43RDAVES256TH ST34THAVES 29THAVES46THAVE S 246TH PL 35THAVES258TH PL 258TH ST 257TH PL 256TH PL 262ND PL 42NDAVESPACIFIC HWY S2 5 9 T H C T 231ST ST 27TH AVE S I-5FWY42NDAVES253RD PL 236TH ST 22ND PL S 30THAVES39THAVES23RD PL S252ND PL 254TH CT 44TH PL S240TH ST 36THPLS239TH ST F E N W I C K C T 45TH PL S252ND PL 45THAVES56TH AVE S 36THAVESS T R A T T F ORDCT 41ST PL S25THAVES24 8 T H P L 241ST ST SAXONCT247TH S T PRINCETONAVE 24TH AVE S 31STAVES250TH ST 234TH ST MILITARY RD S33RD PL S255TH PL 35THPLS252ND ST 258 T HPL 271ST PLMILITARYRDS32NDAVES249TH ST KENTCT 251ST ST23RD PL S2 7 0 TH ST 33RD PL S42NDPLSSOMERSET LN38THAVES243RD ST BRISTOLCTM EE K E R S TCAMBRIDGE DRDOWNING AVE SO MER SET CT236THST43RDAVES261ST ST 249TH ST 248TH ST 272ND W A Y42NDPLSI-5FWYARDENCT272ND PL HAMPTONCT26THPLS 233RD PL 229TH PL 253RD ST 28THAVESRAMP265TH ST27THAVES25THLNS CANTE RBUR Y LN23RDAVES26THAVESREITH RDRIVERVIEW BLVD S 238TH ST28THAVES25THAVES 251STST 26THAVES5 2 N D A V E S 4 8 T HPLS38THAVES261ST PL CARDIFF AVEV E T E R A N S D R 260TH ST 23 9 THPL54THAVES248TH ST 46THAVES47TH AVES4 5 T H P L S RUSS E L L RDS 35TH PL SRAMP 263RDST35THAVESFRAGERRDSKENT - D E S MO IN E S R D S 52ND LN SFRAGERRD S 8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''16''16''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8 '' 8 ''8''8''8''8 '' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8'' 6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''6''6''6''8''8''8''6''6''8'' 8''12''12''16''16'' 6''6''6''8''12' ' 12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''6''6''1 6''16''16''16''16''16''1 6'' 1 6''16''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''16''6''6 ''6' '6''12'' 6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''6''6'' 6'' 6 ''6''6''6''8''6'' 12''12''8 ''8''8'' 6'' 6''8''8''12''6''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8' ' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''16''12'' 12'' 12'' 8 ''8''8''8'' 8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8 ''8''8''8''6''16'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''1 6''16' '16''16''16''16''16''8'' 6''6''8''8' ' 8''8''8''8'' 6'' 6'' 8 ''8''6''6''8''8''8''6''6''1 6'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''8''8'' 6'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6''6''8'' 1 0 '' 1 0 ''10''8''8''12''12''8''8 '' 8''8''8'' 6'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''6 ''8' ' 6 ''8 ''8'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''6''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''16''16''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''8''12' ' 6 ''4''6''12'' 12'' 6''6'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8'' 4'' 6'' 6''6''8'' 2'' 6''8''8''8' '8''12''12'' 12''12''12''12' '8''8''8''6'' 8'' 12''6''12''12''12' '6''6''12''12''12''12 '' 6'' 6 '' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8 ''6''6''8 ''8''8''6'' 8'' 8''8''6''8''6 ''6''8''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6 ''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''8''8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''6''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''6'' 8'' 8''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''12''12''8''8''8''8'' 2'' 2'' 2'' WM3 PZ1 WM2 4 2 5 1 3 3 3 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 529 Zone 587 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-17 CIP-WEST HILL_ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-17 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, West Hill Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. LakeFenwick Green River Reith RoadStandpipe1.0 MG Pump Station #7 PumpStation #3 Pump Station #4 Pump Station #8 CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F3: PumpStation #3 PRV CIP F3: PumpStation #4 PRV CIP F3: PumpStation #7 PRV Cambridge Tank0.3 MG Pump Station #6 CIP F3: PumpStation #6 PRV UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT Íi Íi 240 ZONE 587 ZONE 354.5ZONE WASHINGTONAVEN236TH ST 38THAVESLAKE SID E BLVDW 235TH ST 233RD ST 55T H AVES56THPLS60THCTS50THAVES55THPLS61ST PL S237 TH PL JAMESP L 62NDWAYS 6 4 T H A V E S38THPLS2 3 1S T PL K E N T -D E S M O I N E S RD S45THAVES41STAVES238TH PL53RDPLS40THPLS226THST RAMP42ND PL S251STPL JAMES LN215TH P L44THPLS59T H PL S 215TH S T 63RD WAY S 2 3 4T H PL42NDAVES41STPLS36THAVES232ND S T 23 2 N D PL218THPL 242ND ST 63RDAVES217TH ST 220THPL 237T H ST 242ND PL214TH WAY5 1 S T AVES LAKESIDEBLVDE67TH PL S43RDPLS66THAVES51STAVES238 T HSTMORTON ST K E N T -D E S M O INES RD 236TH PL 245TH CT 46THPLS239TH ST 209TH PL 232N D C T 58TH AVES 61STAVES53RDPLS225THPL RI VERVIEWBLVDS51STCTS43RDAVES220T HST 62ND PL S223RD ST 234TH ST39THWAYS216TH PL 65THAVES211T HPL39THAVES60THAVES221ST PL WEST V A L L E Y H WY S42NDAVES3 5THPLSWASHINGTONAVES221STS T 57TH AVE S JAMES CT JAMES ST56THAVES239THST64THAVES 24 8 T H P L 241ST ST 41STAVESMEEKER ST 62NDAVES53RDAVES54THAVES247TH S T KENT-DESMOI NESRDS250TH ST 46TH AVE S 234TH ST 214TH PL 210TH ST 209TH ST 67THAVES211TH S T 38THAVES243RD ST 222NDP L236 T H ST SMITH CT 249TH ST 248TH ST 42NDPLS224TH PL 2 1 6 T H S T 35TH PL S4 6 THAVES233RD PL SM ITH ST 212TH ST 3 7 T H P L S 40THAVES58TH PL S59TH PL S40 THWAYS41STPLS68THAVESMI L I TARYRDSMILITARY RD S50THAVES238TH ST 216TH ST 231ST ST 224TH ST 2 4 9 T H S T43RDAVES240TH ST212THST 228TH S T 208TH ST V E T E R A N S D R RIDGE VIEWDR52ND WAY S35THAVES2 12TH CT 62NDAVES23 9 THPL45THAVE S 2 5 1 S T S T 220T H S T 2 2 6 T H S T 219TH ST REITHR D 4 5 T H P L S39THPLS 66THAVES42NDAVESORILLI ARDSF R A G E R R D SRUSSELL RD SFRAG E R RDS FRAGERRDSRUS S ELLRDS FRAGERRD S 16'' 16'' 16'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''8''12 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 6''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''16''16''16''16''6''6''16''12''12''12''6''12'' 12''16''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 ''1 6 '' 1 6''16''16''16''16''16''1 6''16' '8''8'' 6'' 12''12''6 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 12 ''12''12''12''12'' 12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''8 ''8' '8''8''16''16''16''12''12''12''12''12 '' 12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12'' 8''16''16''16''12''16''12''12''12''8''8''8 '' 12''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''8''1 6''16' ' 1 6''16' ' 10'' 12'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''10''12''12''6''12' ' 8'' 8''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12 ''12''12''8' '8''8'' 1 2 ''12''12''6''6''8'' 8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12''12''1 2 ''1 0 ''8''8 ''10'' 10'' 8''8''1 6 ''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''12''12''12''12''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8'' 8'' 1 0 '' 8''10''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 12'' 1 2'' 8'' 8'' 8''12''8'' 10'' 8''8''8''8''10''12''10''10''10''10''8''8' ' 8 '' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8''12''10''8''8''6''8''10''8''8 ''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8 '' 8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''8 '' 8'' 8 ''8''12''8''8''8''6''8''8''8'' 8'' 10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''8''6''8'' 8'' 8'' 8 ''8''12''12''12''8''10''8 '' 8''6''6'' 8'' 8''8'' 1 2 '' 1 2 ''12''12''8'' 8'' 6''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''6''12''12''12''12'' 1 2'' 8''8''8'' 8'' 6 '' 8'' 8 ''8''8'' 8 ''8''12' '8''8'' 8'' 1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''8''10'' 8''8''8'' 8''10''10'' 8''12'' 12'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2''12''12'' 8 ''10''10''12''12''12''12''6'' 8''12''12''12''8'' 8'' 1 0 ''1 0 ''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8 ''10''1 0 ''10''8''10''8''8'' 6''8''8''14''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 10'' 10''10'' 2'' 2'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''12''12'' 8''8'' 12''12''8 ''8''8''8'' 8''8' '8''8''8''8''1 0 ''10'' 8''8'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''FFWM2 FFWM2 !!23 !!16 !!16 !!5 !!11 !!15 !!12 !!10 !!10 !!10 FFWM5 FFWM4 N DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities UT Reservoir !(W Well !(S Spring ")I Inter tie Íi Pump Station #*PRV Water Main 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 354.5 Zone 587 Zone Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-18 CIP-WEST 240_ALL.MXD BY: RWITHERS PLOT DATE: MAY 13, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-18 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, 240 Zone - West Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent.Green RiverPumpStation #3 CIP F2: Proposed West Hill Reservoir CIP F1: ProposedWest Hill Booster Pump Station CIP F3: PumpStation #3 PRV 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 590ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONE 308 ZONE 366ZONE 271 ZONE 368 ZONE 339 ZONE JAMES ST88THAVES 242ND S T MEEKER ST VANDEVANTERAVE94THAVESCENTRALAVENJAMES ST KENT-DES MOINES RD S 277TH ST W O O D L A N D W A Y SR 1675THAVESWALN UT ST4THAVENWILLIS ST 266TH ST SCENIC WAYG O W E S T TITUSSTGUIBERSON ST CREST AVESR 167262ND PLJAMES LNGARFIELD AVERAMPWILLIS ST SEATTLE ST5THAVENKENSINGTONAVESSTATEAVEN 87THAVES252ND ST CARTER PL67TH PL S251STST 2 38THST HILLCRESTAVE233RD P L WASHINGTONAVESGOWE S T R E IT E N R D SUMMITAVENWO O D L A N D WA Y 6TH AVE N CENTRALAVES2NDAVENSTATEAVES240T H S T 248T H ST WALNUT ST 232NDST 237T H P L FILBERT ST 238TH PL HEMLOCK ST OLYMPICWAY TEMPERANCE ST CEDAR ST DEAN ST7THAVEN MO RTON STMADISON AVERUSSEL LSTTHOMPSON AVE3RDAVESKENNEBECKAVEN2NDAVES1STAVES94THAVES79THAVESSTATEAVENCLOUDY ST C A N Y O N D R S E SMITH ST CROW ST SAAR ST 97THAVES96THAVES96THAVESJASONAVENSTETSO N AVE ALVORDAVE242ND CT IVES AVESEATTLE PL 277TH ST EAST LN234T H PL RAMSAYWAYHAWL E Y RD BRIDGESAVES244TH P L CHICAGO ST6THAVESRAILROADAVES 2NDAVESHAZELAVEN2 4 0 T H P L 1STAVES2 4 3 R D S T KENSINGTON AVE258THPL WESTVIEWCTWOODFORDAVEN W E ILA NDST WATERMAN ST MAPLE ST MARION STWASHINGTONAVEN71ST PL S241ST STSAM ST HARRISON ST CHE RRY HIL L ST266TH ST 2 3 9TH S T 261 ST ST SMITH ST 97TH PL S239TH ST 245TH PL 246TH PLKENNEBECKAVE NRAILROADAVEN6THAVENJAMES PL 68THAVESHARRISO N ST 261STST3RDAVEN1STAVEN2NDAVENALDER LN68THAVESNOVAKLN 259TH ST 97T H AVES78THAVESWYNW OODDRKENOS IAAVE80THAVESALPIN EWAY C E N T R A L PLSTIL D E N AVE2 3 1 STST 259TH ST RIDGE V IE WDRSR 1671STAVENLENORAAVENPROSPECTAVEN235T H PL RAMP84THPLS91STAVESMACLYN ST 262ND ST 234TH ST 272ND ST MAPLEWOOD AVELAUREL STRAMP MAPLE STALVORDAVEN5THAVES235THPLHILLTOPAVEN MAPLE LNFRAGERRDS 262ND ST GREENRIVERR DNADENAVES72NDAVESHAWLEY RDEAST VALLEY HWY S74THAVES94TH PL S1 2 ''12''12''12''8''12''24''24''2 4'' 16''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 6''8''8''8''8''8''12''1 2 ''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''21'' 21'' 16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''12'' 8'' 8''8'' 1 2 ''8''6'' 12'' 16''16''12''12''12''8''8''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''8''12'' 12''12''12''12''6'' 12''12''16''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12''12''12''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''12''12'' 12''12''12''12''12''1 2'' 6''12''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''12''12''12''6''8''6''12''6''12''16''16''1 6'' 6'' 12''12''8''12''12''12''16' '16' ' 8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''6''1 2 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8''8''8''8''12''8''8''8''6''6''6''8''6''6''6''6'' 6''8''6 '' 12''12''8''6''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 12''12''12'' 6'' 12''8''8''6'' 8'' 6''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''12' '12''8''12''12''12''12''12'' 6''8''8'' 10''6''6''12''8'' 6''10''10''10'' 8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''10''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''12''6'' 6''6''8''8''8'' 8''8''10''6''8''8''8''8''10''10''8 ''6''8 ''8''6''6'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 6''6''8'' 8''8'' 6'' 8''8''8''8''8''6'' 6'' 6''8''8''6''6''6'' 10'' 1 0 '' 10''8''8''8''8''6''6''8'' 8''6''6''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8 '' 10'' 10''16''16''16''12''12''12''10''10''10''8''8''8''8''8'' 46 41 16 12 33 50 36 48 17 23 47 21 23 11 26 45 43 36 44 25 16 38 32 51 46 3438 34 14 52 15 46 28 20 49 24 36 18 38 31 19 7 22 10 13 45 46 10 46 35 27 29 30 42 33 46 37 39 40 39 53 46 38 10 47 6 WM7 WM8 WM4 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent PotentialAnnexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated KingCounty (O utsideUGA) City of Kent RetailWater Service Area Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Pressure Zones 240 Zone 271 Zone 308 Zone 339 Zone 366 Zone 368 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Water Main 240 Zone 271 Alvord 308 Hilltop Zone 339 Seattle Zone 366 Stetson Zone 368 Weiland Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main TacomaTransmission Main Distribution SystemReplacementProjects to Meet2019 Design Criter ia High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 -PZ2 J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-19 CIP-DOWNTOWN_ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-19 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, 240 Zone - Downtown Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Green River GuibersonReservoir3.0 MG CIP F7: GuibersonReservoir Replacement 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 CIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating #*UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT UT !(W !(W !(W !(W240 ZONE 590ZONE 485 ZONEHILLTOP PRVZONE 590 ZONE 205TH CT71ST PL S 100TH CT SE197TH ST 204TH CT226TH ST 2 2 1 S T P L 218THPL 91STC T S214THST OAKESD AL E AVE SW 49TH ST71ST AVE S 95TH PL S98THPLSE181ST ST LIND AVE SW 214TH P L 199TH ST 204T H ST 220TH L N 205TH PL 216TH P L 220T H P L 95TH CT SDAVISPLS230TH ST 191ST PL 95THAVES230TH PL 223RD PLLAKEPLSSPERRY DRTALBOTRDS192ND PL SMITHERS AVE S 90THWAYS99TH PL S220TH ST 198TH PL 210TH ST EAST VAL LEY RD 193RD PL 227TH PL 2 1 0TH PL 224TH S T 226TH PL213THPL96THPLS225THPL 78TH AVE S 51ST CT 67THAVES43RD ST 85TH PL S1 8 2 N D S T 204THPL 227THST97THPLS202ND ST 2 0 3 R DPL 212TH ST 194TH ST GLACIER ST 95TH PL S2 1 3 T H ST98THAVES206TH PL 46 T H P L 91STPLS47TH ST 98THPLS97THAVES85THAVES22 9THPL86THAVES84TH PL S211TH ST 48TH S T RIVERSIDEDR 50TH PL 180TH ST 222ND ST 53RD PL 92NDAVES192ND ST TODD BLVD 93RDAVES231ST ST 216TH ST 224TH ST NOVAK LN 193RD ST 45TH PL 91ST PL SE1 96TH PL 207TH CT 194TH ST 72NDAVES50TH ST 94THAVES2NDAVEN98THAVES99THPLS88TH PL S208TH ST CASCADEAVES88THAVES93RDPLS96THAVES202ND ST 101STAVESE70THAVES86TH PL STALBOTRDSC A RRRD97THAVES90TH PL S90THAVES206TH ST 220T H ST 180TH ST 219TH ST 184TH ST 83RD AVE S68THAVES70THAVES224TH ST64THAVES 84THAVES98TH PL S92NDAVES198TH ST 84THAVES80THAVES216TH ST66THAVES 64THAVESSR 167190TH ST 187TH ST 188TH ST 85THAVES222ND ST 204TH ST RAMP87THAVES72NDAVES6THAVEN192ND ST 68THAVES4 T H A V E NANDOVERPARKW 208TH ST77THAVES 212TH WAY80THAVES72NDAVES88THAVES80 THPLS 76THAVESSR 167208TH ST 216T H ST CENTRALAVEN218T H ST 196TH ST EASTVALLEYHWYSSHATTUCKPL S 203RD ST 43RD ST TALBOT PL SMORRISAVES200TH PL96TH WAY SWHITWORTH PL S228TH ST 207T H P L 212TH ST 96THAVES95THAVES232ND ST66THAVES81STAVES231STST94THPLS91STWAYS228TH ST 99THAVES200TH STOLYMPICAVES 100THAVESERAMPDAVISAVESSR 167190TH ST 68THAVES194TH ST RAMPSR167200TH ST 16''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''12''12''12''1 2 ''12.6''16''16'' 16'' 12''12''16''12''12''12''12'' 12'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''1 6 ''12''12''1 2 ''12''12'' 16''16'' 12''16''12''12'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 16'' 16'' 12''12''12' '16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''16''12''12''16''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''16'' 12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''1 2'' 16''16''1 6 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12'' 18''18''18'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''16''16''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 12''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''6''6''6''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''12''12''12''10'' 10''10''10''8''12''8''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''8''12''12''8''8''8'' 10'' 8''8'' 8'' 10'' 12'' 12'' 8'' 10'' 6'' 1 2 ''12''8'' 8''10''6''8'' 8''8''6''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''2''8''8''8 ''8''8''8'' 10''8''8' '8''8''12''12''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''10'' 1 0 ''8''10''8''10''1 2 ''12''12''8''10''8'' 8 ''8''10''10'' 10''8''8''8''8'' 12''12''8''8''8''12''8''10'' 10'' 10''10''6'' 8'' 8 '' 8'' 8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''10''6''10''8''12''10''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 10''10''1 0''10''8''10''12''12''12''12''8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''8''8''12''12''8''12''12''10''10''12''12''12''12''12'' 1 2'' 1 2 ''12''12''12'' 10'' 8 '' 6''8''8''6''8''12''12''12''12''8''8''12'' 8'' 8'' 12''8''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12'' 8''8''12''12''12'' 8''10''8''12''12''12''12''12''12' ' 6 '' 8''8'' 1 2 ''8''12''8''10''10''10'' 8'' 8''10''10''8''10''10''8''6''12''12''1 2 ''12''12''8'' 8'' 12''12''12'' 10''16''6''10' ' 12'' 8 ''16''16''16''16''16''16''16'' 1 6 '' 1 6 '' 1 6 ''10''10' ' 8'' 8'' 8 '' 8 '' 10''12''12''12''12''8''8''8'' 8''10''12''12'' 8'' 16''16''16''16''16'' 16''16''16''12''16''8'' 12''14''8''8''10''10''10''10'' 10'' 10'' 10''10''10''10''10''10''10' ' 1 0 ''12''12''12''10' '10' '10' '10''10''10''10''1 0 ''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 8''8'' 8''8''10''10'' 1 0 ''8''8''12''12'' 10''10''12''12''12''12''12''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''8''8''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10'' 10''10''10''10' '10' '10''10''10''10''10'' 10''10'' 12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''12''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''12''12''12''12''12''!!9 !!9 !!8 !!9 !!42 FFWM5 FFWM10 FFWM6FFWM4 FFWM9 N DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation Areas King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Area Facilities UT Reservoir !(W Well !(S Spring ")I Intertie Íi Pump Station #*PRV Water Main 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main Distribution System Replacement Pr ojectsto Meet 2019 D esign C riteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 308 Hilltop Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-20 CIP-NORTH 240_ALL.MXD BY: RWITHERS PLOT DATE: JUN 14, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-20 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, 240 Zone - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, (c)OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 600 1,200300 Feet 1 inch = 600 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. 208th/212th Street Wellfieldand 212th Street Treatment Plant Garrison C reekWell and 6 MG#2 Reservoir O'Brien Well CIP F8: Garrison/O’BrienTreatment Plant 590 ZONE 485ZONE 485ZONE 640ZONE 262ND PL 116THAVESE256TH ST 227TH PL 251ST ST 249TH ST 114TH W AY SE 264TH ST100THAVESE237TH PL 240TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE9 7 THAVES112THAVESE238 T HST 124THAVESE105THAVESE2 6 3 R D ST108THAVESE222NDC T 117THAVESE108THAVESE252ND ST 114THAVESE100THAVESE237THPL 223R D P L 104THAVESE2 5 0 T H C T 122NDAVESE2 3 2NDST244TH ST 104THAVESE96TH PL SC A N Y O N D R S E 256TH PL 121ST PL SE229 THPL117TH PL SE118TH PL SE1 1 9 T HPL SE 240THP L 106THAVESE248TH ST 2 6 1 S T S T 230TH ST 251ST PL 234TH ST 258TH ST 253RD PL 112TH PL SE 127THAVESE115THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110TH PLS E 224TH ST 235THST261ST ST 224TH PL 99THAVES2 5 3 R D S T 2 29TH ST107THPLSE120TH PL SE244TH ST 118THPLSE126THAVESE120THAVESEKENT-KANGLEY RD 2 30TH PL 111THPLSE119THAVES E 223RD ST 1 1 9 T H D R S E98THAVES 264TH PL 99TH PL S123RDAVES E 247TH PL 125TH PL SE250TH PL 246T H PL 110 T H P L S E252ND PL 228T H C T 244TH CT 124TH PL SE1 26THPLSE118TH AVE SE 236TH ST 120THAVESE122NDPLSE263RDCT 23 6 THP L 242N D PL 264TH ST 126THPLS E262ND C T 228TH ST 233RD ST 261ST PL112THAVESE260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE222ND PL 1 2 7THAVESE255THPL 227THST123RD PL SE233R DST108THAVESE110THAVESE232N D ST102NDC TSE266TH PL 222ND ST 125THPLSE98TH PL S106TH AVE SE 118THCTSE98TH PL SE 2 2 3 R D D R 1 0 1 S T P L S E 2 5 3 R D C T 254T H C T117THAVESE103RD AVE SE 117TH PL SE113THAVESE257TH ST 238TH PL 252ND ST 255TH PL 1 0 8 T H P L S E 128TH PL SE124TH AVE SE 106THAVESE241ST PL 248 T H P L 229TH PL 262ND PL 260TH ST 246THPL 254TH P L WOODLAND WAY S 2 2 6 TH S T 232ND PL 263R D P L 128THAVESE225TH ST 110THPLSE123RDPLSE127THCTSE112TH PL SE 1 0 9 THCT S E102NDAVESE105TH PL SE123RDAVESE257TH PL 25 9 T H S T 232ND ST 258TH PL 226TH S T 265THCT109THP L S E 125THAVESE108TH PL SE265TH PL112THPLSE 254TH ST 245TH PL 110 TH A VESE11 9 T H AVESE24 4 T H P L 122ND PL SE113THAVESE109THAVESE243RD ST 109TH PL SE241ST ST 119THWAYSE235TH ST 109THAVESE23 9TH P L 102NDPLSE126TH PL SE260TH PL115THPLSE 124THAVESE236TH PL 9 7 T H P L S 98THPLS228TH P L 12 2 NDA V E SE 228 T H P L 231STST 117THAVESE226TH PL 2 23RDL N237TH PL 234TH PL 266TH ST 235THPL 267TH ST 102ND PL SE115THAVESE234TH PL 225TH CT227THST 251ST PL 107TH AVE SE 238TH ST 236TH ST 102NDPLSE101STAVE SE259TH PL 222ND PL 250TH P L 235TH P L 113THPLSE119THPLSE103RDAVESE104TH PL SE1 2 5 TH PL SE105THPLSE259TH ST 239TH ST 100THPLSE231ST ST 258TH PL 97THAVESBENSON RD SE111TH PL SE114THLNSE233RD PL 114THAVESE242ND ST101STAVESE127THPL SE107THAVESE106THPLSE237TH ST 101ST PL SE114TH PL SE123RDPLSE106TH PL SE1 2 6 THAVESE225TH PL 111THAVESE2 3 1 S T P L W O O D L A N D W A Y 1 0 0 T H P L S E16''16''16''16''16'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 12'' 8''8'' 8''12''8''8' ' 8''8''8''1 2'' 12'' 12''12''12''8''12''16' '16''12'' 12''12''8''16''16''16''16''12''1 2''8''8' '12''16''16''16''16''8''8''8'' 12'' 12''12''16''12''12''1 6 ''8' ' 12''12''12''12' '16''16''16''16''16''16''6''8''8''8''8 ''6'' 16''16''16''16'' 16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''16''6' ' 8''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8 '' 16''16''12'' 1 2'' 1 2'' 12''12' '8''6''6''6''6''8''8'' 8''8''8''8'' 12'' 1 2 ''12'' 12''12''12''12''6''16''12''12''12''8''8'' 8''6''6''8'' 8'' 6 '' 16''12''8''8''6''8''8''16''16''16''16''12''12''1 2''12''8'' 8'' 12'' 16''10''12''12''12''8''8''6''8''8''8 '' 8''8''8''8''8''16'' 16''12''16''16''16''16''6''16''12''16''8'' 16'' 10''12''12''12'' 1 2 ''12''8''8''8'' 16''12''12''12'' 12''16''8 '' 8 ''8''8''8''16''16''8''8'' 16''16''8''8''8'' 12'' 10''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''6''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''6''8''18''18''12''12'' 8'' 10''8''8''8''6''10''10''8 ''12''12''12'' 16'' 8'' 10''10''8''8''8''10''6''6''8 ''12'' 8'' 2''8''8''8''8''6' ' 8''10''8''8''8''8''10''10''8''8'' 8''8''8''10''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''10''8'' 6'' 6''8''8'' 10''10''10''10''6''12''8'' 8'' 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21''6''6''8''8''10''6''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8'' 8 ''8'' 8''8''8''8''8''8 ''6''8''8''8''6''10''10''10''8''8''6''8''12'' 8''6''8'' 8''8''10''8''6''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''6''8''6'' 6'' 8''6''6''8''6'' 6''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''8''6''6''6''8''8''8''8''8''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''18''8 ''6''8' '8''6'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8'' 8 ''6'' 8''8'' 8'' 8'' 6 '' 21''21'' 2 1''21' ' 21''21'' 6'' 6'' 8''8''6'' 8'' 8 ''8'' 8''8''8''8''8'' 12''6''8 '' 6'' 8'' 8''8''8''6''24''8''8''8'' 18''18''18''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''8''12''12''12''8''8''6''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8''8''6''8'' 8'' 8''8' '8''6'' 8'' 8''8'' 8''8''8 ''8''8 ''8'' 8''10''6''8''8' '8''8''8''8'' 8'' 6''8''8''1 2 ''8''8''8''8''8' ' 8'' 24'' 24'' 24'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''8' ' 8 ''8''8''8''8''8''8'' 8'' 8''8''8''8 ''8''6''6''8''8 ''8''8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''8'' 8''8''8'' 8''6''6''10''10'' 8'' 8'' 8'' 8''8''6''6''6'' 8''8''8''8''8''8''18''18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 18''6''6''6''10''10''10''10''10''10''10''16''16''16''16'' 55 55 54 PZ2 PZ2 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc orporated King County (Outside U GA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Intertie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Transmission Main Distribution System Replacement Pr ojectsto Meet 2019 D esign C riteria High Priority Medium Priority Low Priority City-Identified C IP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-21 CIP-EAST HILL-ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-21 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvement Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, East Hill - North Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derived fromthe City of Kent Geographic Inform ation System.It was designed and intended for City of Kent staffuse only; it is not guaranteed to survey accuracy.This m ap is based on the best informationavailable on the date shown on this map. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is ow ned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Blue B oy Standpipe 640 Tank 6 MG #1 Reservoir125K TankPump Station #5 East Hill Well Seven Oaks Well CIP F6: 125K TankExterior Recoating CIP F4: Proposed640 Zone BPS #1 240 ZONE 590 ZONE 485ZONE 640ZONE99TH PL S256TH ST 251ST ST 249TH ST 264TH ST 118THAVESE1 10THAVESE273 R DPL 258TH ST 124THAVESE290TH ST106THAVESE 270TH ST 263 R D ST279THP L 268TH ST 269THST 121ST PL SE11 0 T H P L SE280TH ST 262ND PL 2 5 0 T H C T 274TH ST116THAVESE 122NDAVESE256TH PL 112THAVESE123RD PL SE2 6 1 S T S T 251ST PL 4 9 T H S T N E2 7 8TH PL 253RD PL 120THAVESE112TH PL SE 279TH ST 114THAVESE1 2 1 STAVESE110 T H P L S E 271ST ST252NDPL 11 9 THAVESE276TH PL 261ST ST 117TH PL SE272ND ST112THAVESE253RDST 276TH ST120THPLSE 29 2 N D S T118THPLSE252ND ST 119TH DR SE 264TH P L 266TH PL99TH PL S109THPLSE124THPLSE126THAVESE280 T H ST 121STAVESE250TH PL 252NDP L 124TH PL SEP I KESTNE118THWAYSE1 1 5 T HA V E SE 122NDPLSE270TH PL 43RD ST NE 292NDWAY 264TH ST 126THPLS E262ND C T261ST PL260THS T 1 2 2 NDWAYSE122 N D P L SE112THAVESE255THPL 1 2 1 S T W A Y S E117THCTS E 42NDST N E272ND ST 276TH WAY125THPLSE281ST STOC T NE 98TH PL S108THAVESE1 2 2 N D W A Y S E105THAVESE120THWAYSE2 5 3 R D C T 105TH AVE SE 254T H C T 117TH PL SE257TH ST 252ND ST 255TH PL 102NDAVESE106THAVESEQ ST NE 118TH C TSE295TH ST 121STPL S E 2 9 1 S T S T 111THAVESE262ND PL 266TH CT 293RD ST 5 1 S T ST NE 288TH ST107THPLSE260TH ST 277TH ST105TH PL SE254TH P L 273RD C T 1 0 9 T HAVES E272ND PLWOODLANDWAY S 277TH PL 127THAVESE114THAVESE26 3 R D P L 122NDPLSE1 0 9 T HC T S E 293R D S T 257TH PL 25 9 T H S T 258TH PL 103RDAVESE265THCT 265TH PL 254TH ST R ST NE122ND PL SE113THAVESE268TH ST 116THAVESEC A N Y O N D R S E 5 0 T H S T N E 109THAVESE292ND ST267TH PL 123RDPLSE260TH PL 9 7 T H P L S 2 7 4 T H S T 283RD ST 120THPLSE266TH ST 104THAVESE106THAVESE275TH ST102ND PL SE116TH PL SE125THAVESE273RD PL 251ST PL 275TH P L101STAVE SE259THPL 250TH P L 288TH PL119THPLSE110THAVESE286TH PL105THPLSE259THST 118THAVESE107THAVESE282ND ST 258TH PL 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18'' 18'' 18'' 18''24''24''24''21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21'' 21''10''10''10''10''55 55 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 PZ2 WM13 WM12 W M 11 DRAWING IS FULL SCALE WHEN BAR MEASURES 2” Legend Kent C ity Limits City of Kent Potential Annexation King C ounty UGA Uninc or porated King County (Outside UGA) City of Kent Retail Water Service Facilities Reservoir Well Spring Inter tie Pump Station PRV Water Main 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone Transmission Main Tacoma Tr ansmission Main Dist ribution System Replacement Projectsto Meet 2019 Design Criteria High Priority Medium Pr iority Low Priority City-Identified CIP WM2 - WM13; PZ1 - PZ2 Pressure Zones 240 Zone 485 Zone 590 Zone 640 Zone J:\DATA\KEN\117-100\GIS\MAPS\FIGURE 9-22 CIP-EAST HILL-SOUTH_ALL.MXD BY: DBRIGHT PLOT DATE: MAY 8, 2019 COORDINATE SYSTEM: NAD 1983 HARN STATEPLANE WASHINGTON NORTH FIPS 4601 FEETVicinity MapFigure 9-22 City of K entCity of K ent Capital Improvements Projects 2019 Water System Plan2019 Water System Plan All Projects, East Hill - South Esri, HERE, Garmin, ©OpenStreetMap contributors,and the GIS user community 0 500 1,000250 Feet 1 inch = 500 feet This map is a graphic representation derivedfrom the C ity of Kent Geographic InformationSystem. It w as designed and intended for City ofKent staff use only; it is not guaranteed to surveyaccuracy. This map is based on the bestinformation available on the date shown on thismap. Any reproduction or sale of this map, or portionsthereof, is prohibited without express writtenauthorization by the City of Kent. This material is owned and copyrighted by theCity of Kent. Seven Oaks Well 3.5 MG Tank Tacoma POD #3 CIP F5: Proposed640 Zone BPS #2 640 Tank Transmission Main From:Armstrong Springs WellsClark SpringsKent SpringsTacoma POD #1 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) 10-1 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT 10 | FINANCIAL ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION This Chapter of the City of Kent’s (City) 2019 Water System Plan (WSP) puts forth a strategy for implementing the capital and non-capital recommendations identified throughout the WSP. A financial analysis is presented to evaluate the ability of the City to financially support the necessary improvements to the water system identified in the Capital Improvements Plan put forth in Chapter 9. A 10-year proposed budget is provided that identifies the overall revenue requirements compared to anticipated income. This section is not intended to be a rate analysis, but is provided as a cursory review of revenue requirements and identification of potential funding sources. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY Provision of public water service is essential to the preservation of public health, safety, and protection of the environment. Because water and other utility systems must maintain a high level of integrity, they require a much greater capital investment to operate and maintain than most other public services. Most water utility costs are fixed, due to the nature of funding large capital improvements, and the relatively stable costs of operating labor, insurance, and other expenses that do not vary with water use. Fixed costs, which are incurred regardless of customer consumption, are associated with making the service available at the point of customer use. A smaller proportion of a utility systems cost is variable and changes with the volume of water consumed and/or used (i.e. the cost of purchased water, power for pumping, etc.). The City strives to maintain reasonable water rates while maintaining the integrity of the water system and the service provided by the Water Department. The water utility is operated out of a separate utility fund, adding to the viability of the utility and ability to set water rates dedicated to the maintenance and upgrade of the water system as required to meet the public health and safety needs of current and projected system customers. FUNDING SOURCES Funding sources available to the City for capital projects consist primarily of debt mechanisms or cash funding through various rates and fees. Historically, federal and state grant programs were available for financial assistance; however, these have been mostly eliminated or replaced by loan programs. Remaining miscellaneous grant programs are generally lightly funded and heavily subscribed. Although competitive, the benefits of low-interest loan programs in the State of Washington include relatively low administrative costs and the ability to spread costs over a period of time to reduce sudden rate impacts. Income from water sales is the primary source of revenue and is utilized to finance Water Department expenses that are not otherwise funded by developer extensions, assessments, system development charges (SDCs), or miscellaneous fees. Typical expenses financed from water sales include: operation and maintenance; water supply and quality analysis; administrative, CHAPTER 10 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 10-2 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT accounting and collection expenses; debt service requirements; system renewal and replacement; and other general operating expenses. The City’s rate schedule as of January 1, 2019 is listed in Table 10-1. Water rates are subject to periodic changes, and current rates are available on the City’s website at http://www.kentwa.gov. Rates include a block rate structure and rebates for low-flow water fixtures as incentive to encourage water conservation and provide customers options for reducing their water bills with certain lifestyle changes. The City’s rate structure is designed to encourage conservation, which reduces consumption and sales related to consumption. It is imperative that water sales and revenues are closely monitored to ensure water rates and revenues are sufficient. Revenues and expenses are monitored throughout the year to ensure operations are occurring as anticipated in the City’s approved budget. Bi-annual budgets are prepared to estimate revenues and expenditures for the following years. Water rates are periodically reviewed to determine the adequacy of projected revenues to cover anticipated expenditures. It is important to review rates and system connection charges at the completion of water system plan updates, when updated population, employment, and demand projections are developed to confirm project needs during the 10-year planning horizon and beyond. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN FINANCIAL ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) 10-3 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 10-1 Water System 2019 Rates Meter Size Monthly (inches)Fee 0-800 cf 2.52$ Residential 800+ cf 4.96$ <1 24.28$ 1 38.01$ Commerical Size <1 30.52$ <3/4 100.00$ 1 44.25$ 3/4 125.00$ 1.5 78.59$ 1 175.00$ 2 119.80$ 1.5 360.00$ 3 188.48$ 2 500.00$ 4 284.63$ >2 6 422.00$ 8 559.36$ 10 696.73$ Dedicated Fireline <1 7,694.19$ <1 2.89$ 1 19,234.84$ 1 3.37$ 1.5 38,468.40$ 1.25 5.05$ 2 61,549.70$ 1.5 6.73$ 3 123,100.70$ 2 10.77$ 4 192,344.60$ 3 26.92$ 5 288,331.30$ 4 53.82$ 6 384,689.20$ 6 107.65$ 8 615,502.19$ 8 181.67$ 10 846,315.22$ 10 269.14$ Backflow Fee 106.71$ System Development Fees Water Utility Meter Access Fees Water Usage Fees per 100 cubic feet (748 gallons) Water Tap Fees (new connections) See KCC 7.02.160 [C] To establish an affordable and sustainable rate structure, the City compiled a list of current rate structures at comparable neighboring water districts. Prior to the rate study, the City was on the low to mid-range of its comparable districts. The rate increase adopted in November 2016 allowed the City to remain in the mid-range for residential and commercial rates. At this point, the City does not anticipate the need to take on additional debt for funding the capital program over the term of this WSP, as it is a balanced plan. If, during this time, circumstances change that require financing through debt or other sources beyond cash financing, there are multiple options that could be considered depending on the need. These options include: CHAPTER 10 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 10-4 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT • State-funded programs: Public Works Trust Fund Loans; and • Bonds: Assessment Bonds; General Obligation (G.O.) Bonds; Councilmanic G.O. Bonds; and Revenue Bonds. FINANCING PLAN AND PAST PERFORMANCE In 2016, the City completed a water rate study and subsequently adopted a new structure for water rates that addressed the operating and capital needs for the system. The new rates included adopting a fee for dedicated fire lines; adding an automatic annual cost of living increase for fees associated with use, meters, and fire lines; increasing the meter fee based on size and flow; and eliminating the winter and summer rates to have one year-round rate. Additionally, the adopted rate structure started to address the imbalance of fixed and variable revenue to fixed and variable expenses by increasing meter fees, implementing the fire line fee, and reducing the use fee on the first tier. This imbalance was partially a consequence of a highly successful water efficiency and conservation effort that discouraged high water use and, therefore, sales related to that use. The implemented changes have been in place since January1, 2017, and have proven to be a sustainable rate structure to fund the operating and capital needs of the system. The current rate structure has been set to handle emergency situations. In the event of large or small emergencies, funds can be diverted from capital projects, or the capital fund balance can be used to cover expenses. In December 2017, City Council adopted a fund balance reserve policy that requires a 20 percent of operating expenses fund balance that would be available for use in case of an emergency. The estimated costs of proposed capital improvement projects recommended, as well as anticipated revenue and operating expenses for the 10-year planning horizon, are detailed in Table 10-2. It is anticipated that projects identified in this WSP will be financed from cash on hand. It is important to note that the anticipated revenue and expenses beyond the council adopted budget for 2019-2020 are estimates based on minimal growth that include a cost of living increase for the water revenues and expenses over the term of this WSP. A historical look at revenues and expenses also is provided in Table 10-3. The combination of the historical data, in conjunction with the financial plan for future revenues and expenditures, demonstrate the financial viability of the City of Kent’s Water Utility. The funding for capital improvements in this WSP is balanced. However, the City recognizes that the economy and other factors can change the needs of the water system. The City periodically contracts or performs rate studies to analyze changes in circumstance. The last rate study was completed and adopted in 2016, and the City anticipates beginning another rate study in 2020 to be completed in 2022. CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN FINANCIAL ANALYSIS Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) 10-5 PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 10-2 Water Operating Fund Projections 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Preliminary Budget Budget Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Revenues Charges for Services 22,519,154 23,363,100 23,923,790 24,497,961 25,085,912 25,687,974 26,304,485 26,935,793 27,582,252 28,244,226 28,922,087 System Dev/Connection Charges 1,852,189 1,451,100 1,480,120 1,515,643 1,552,018 1,589,267 1,627,409 1,666,467 1,706,462 1,747,417 1,789,355 Miscellaneous Revenue 1,178,818 661,350 674,580 690,770 707,348 724,325 741,709 759,510 777,738 796,403 815,517 Transfers In - - - - - - - - - - - Operating Revenues 25,550,161 25,475,550 26,078,490 26,704,374 27,345,279 28,001,565 28,673,603 29,361,769 30,066,452 30,788,047 31,526,960 Transfers In-Debt Service 3,760,718 4,113,510 3,579,390 4,604,978 4,061,511 3,515,473 4,146,464 4,130,653 4,109,197 4,093,757 4,076,208 Total Revenues 29,310,879 29,589,060 29,657,880 31,309,352 31,406,790 31,517,039 32,820,067 33,492,422 34,175,649 34,881,804 35,603,168 Expenditures Salaries & Benefits 3,152,687 3,500,220 3,614,120 3,722,544 3,834,220 3,949,247 4,067,724 4,189,756 4,315,448 4,444,912 4,578,259 Supplies 537,557 815,650 830,030 846,631 863,563 880,834 898,451 916,420 934,749 953,444 972,512 Services & Charges 9,281,302 10,874,800 11,224,460 11,448,949 11,677,928 11,911,487 12,149,716 12,392,711 12,640,565 12,893,376 13,151,244 Vehicles & Equipment - 120,000 - - - - - - - - - Cost Allocation (371,148) (480,000) (480,000) (494,400) (509,232) (524,509) (540,244) (556,452) (573,145) (590,339) (608,050) Transfers to Debt Service 46,983 - - - - - - - - - - Transfers to Capital Projects 7,760,420 13,119,000 5,627,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 6,000,000 Debt Service - Principal 2,044,028 2,304,030 2,264,020 2,951,528 2,509,750 2,065,000 2,800,000 2,925,000 3,052,500 3,192,500 3,337,500 Debt Service - Interest 1,719,948 1,809,480 1,315,370 1,653,450 1,552,761 1,450,473 1,346,464 1,205,653 1,056,697 901,257 738,708 Operating Expenditures 24,171,777 32,063,180 24,395,000 26,128,701 25,928,990 25,732,532 26,722,111 27,073,088 27,426,814 27,795,150 28,170,174 Transfers Out - Debt Service 3,760,718 4,160,320 3,579,390 4,604,978 4,061,511 3,515,473 4,146,464 4,130,653 4,109,197 4,093,757 4,076,208 Total Expenditures 27,932,495 36,223,500 27,974,390 30,733,680 29,990,501 29,248,005 30,868,576 31,203,740 31,536,012 31,888,907 32,246,381 Change in Fund Balance 1,378,384 (6,634,440) 1,683,490 575,672 1,416,289 2,269,034 1,951,492 2,288,682 2,639,638 2,992,897 3,356,786 Ending Fund Balance 14,466,575 7,832,135 9,515,625 10,091,297 11,507,586 13,776,619 15,728,111 18,016,793 20,656,430 23,649,328 27,006,114 CHAPTER 10 CITY OF KENT WATER SYSTEM PLAN 10-6 Z:\BOTHELL\DATA\KEN\117-100\PLAN\2019-WSPCH10.DOC (9/30/2019 1:57 PM) PREPARED BY CITY OF KENT Table 10-3 Water Operating Fund History 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Actuals Actuals Preliminary Actuals Actuals Actuals Revenues Charges for Services 16,249,512 17,007,080 18,411,975 18,901,932 18,751,378 21,810,968 System Dev/Connection Charges 1,266,547 1,370,342 1,338,469 890,927 1,495,241 1,986,572 Miscellaneous Revenue 713,106 1,101,250 1,339,026 498,209 846,052 976,012 Transfers In - 5,854 10,026 - 4,838 500 Operating Revenues 18,229,165 19,484,526 21,099,496 20,291,068 21,097,509 24,774,052 Transfers In-Debt Service 3,480,575 4,397,692 3,668,805 3,676,293 3,428,491 3,435,184 Total Revenues 21,709,740 23,882,218 24,768,301 23,967,361 24,526,000 28,209,236 Expenditures Salaries & Benefits 3,105,497 2,839,228 2,780,926 2,863,591 3,016,383 2,956,384 Supplies 541,390 585,486 530,365 575,318 745,453 621,832 Services & Charges 7,035,164 8,026,927 7,822,797 8,051,658 8,345,677 8,919,899 Vehicles & Equipment - - - 144,766 - 17,661 Cost Allocation (737,533) (879,343) (456,770) (505,647) (480,711) (506,142) Transfers to Debt Service 46,969 48,936 47,064 47,100 46,894 47,360 Transfers to Capital Projects 3,151,301 2,704,254 3,025,900 2,800,000 3,009,738 7,450,000 Debt Service - Principal 1,667,974 2,782,326 2,016,528 2,071,528 1,971,528 2,024,028 Debt Service - Interest 1,812,601 1,615,366 1,652,277 1,612,939 1,571,379 1,611,727 Operating Expenditures 16,623,363 17,723,180 17,419,087 17,661,253 18,226,341 23,142,749 Transfers Out - Debt Service 3,480,575 4,397,692 3,668,805 3,676,293 3,428,491 3,435,184 Total Expenditures 20,103,938 22,120,872 21,087,892 21,337,546 21,654,832 26,577,933 Change in Fund Balance 1,605,802 1,761,346 3,680,409 2,629,815 2,871,168 1,631,303 Ending Fund Balance 1,363,111 3,344,832 7,020,229 8,817,521 11,029,672 13,088,191 Historical information was gathered from budget documents located on the City website 2014 are preliminary numbers actuals not printed in budget book. APPENDIX A Water Facilities Inventory (WFI) Form THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK /,D t Wrehhgtonst*@mtof{rHealth WATER FACtLtTtES TNVENTORY WFt) FORM ONE FORM PER SYSTEM RETURN TO: Cenhal Services - WFl, PO 9ox47822, Olympia, WA, 98504-7822 Quarter: 1 Updated: 9971 7729 1 9 Printed:9/26/2019 WFI Printed For: On-Demand Submission Reason : Sour6ltlpdatgDit'isitrt of Lilz,itliltDk ttil I l&lth O{li.'. L'f Drtnki'ts tytt!( P*uurn*, qphvrL 1. SYSTEM lD iro. 38150 1 2. SYSTEM I{AI'E KENT WATER DEPARTMENT lr courn IKrNG 4. GROUP A 5. TYPE Comm 6. PRmARY CONTACT NAME & illAlLlNG ADDRESS 7. OWNER NAME & MA|L|NG ADDRESS lA. OWNen TUUBER: 0029fl) SEAN M. BAUER IMANAGER] 220 4TH AVE S KENT, WA 98032 KENT, CITY OF TIM LAPORTE 220 4TH AVE S KENT, WA 98032 PW DIRECTOR STREET ADDRESS IF DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE ATTN ADDRESS CtTy STATE ZIP STREST ADDRESS IF DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE ATTN ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP 9.24 HOUR PRIMARY CONTACT INFORMATION IO. OWNER CONTACT INFORMATION Primary Contact Daytime Phone: (253) 856-5610 Owner Daytime Phone: (253) 856-5500 Primary Contact Mobile/Cell Phone: (253) 740-7089 Owner Mobile/Cell Phone: Primary Contact Evening Phone: (xxx)-xxx-xxxx Owner Evening Phone: Fax: (253) 856-6600 E-mail: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Fax:E-mail: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx ll. SATELLITE ITANAGEMENT AGENCY. SMA (check only one) E Not applicable (Skip to #12) 5 Owned and Managed SMA NAME: a Managed Only A Owned Only S$rilA Number: 12. WATER SYSTEM CHARACTERISTICS (mark allthat apply) fl Agricultural [t Commercial / Business I Day Care fi Food Service/Food Permit 0r more event for 2 or more1 [| Hospital/Clinic [[ lndustrial fi Licensed Residential Facility [[ Lodging Recreational / RV Park [t Residential [t School ! Temporary Farm Worker fi Other (church, fire station, etc.): 3. a Association / Town a County Federal 5 lnvestor Private 5 Special District State STORAGE GAPAGITY (gallons) 23,225,000 - SEE NEXT PAGE FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SOURCES - Page: 1DOH 331-01 1 (Rev, 06/03)DOH Copy WATER FACILITIES INVENTORY (WFl) FORM - Gontinued ,I. SYSTEM ID NO. 38150 1 2. SYSTEM NAME KENTWATER DEPARTMENT ls. coul.rw l^,*o 4. GROUP A 5. TYPE Comm 15 16 SOURCE NAME 17 INTERTIE l8 SOURCE CATEGORY t9 usE 20 21 TREATMENT 22 DEPTH 23 24 SOURCE LOCATION a,g eozc 3ato L]ST UflL] TS NAME FOR SOURCE ANDWELL TAG ID NI'MBER. Example: WELL #l XYZ/156 ]F SOURCE IS PURCHASED OR INTERflED, LISTSELLER'S NAilE Example: SEATILE INTERTIE SYSTEM ID NUMBER =mrt- €m t-Im 0 tml.-z {m t-Im-o o!1zo o!1zol!ml.o o!n2o 2 at,!42o1r mro om =-{ln7 o 7ion ={m ^ v zz m 2:lo r lrlv o-{+mv !mn =zn-{ om ato2- m =mvomzo oocaC'm =mJdvmo 2o2lll o-t-ou =Io2 ! 5! -{o- t|.co 4. E j oz -v 0t{o2 cs o{Imu H 32- Eg>t7Ut 2: EE o ! I Hlr?i =>2'-cirta 5.. Iono{o2 a,no 62zc =Ema Io{2o4i u zom s01 Kent Springs '1,2,3 X X X X 6800 SE SW 33 22N 06E s02 Clark Springs 1,2,3 X X Y X 5400 NE SE 33 22N 06E s03 lnAct 06/01/1989 Clark Springs 2 X X Y X 1 800 NE SW 33 22N 06E s04 lnAct 06/01/1989 Clark Springs 3 X X 2700 SWNW 33 22N 06E s05 East Hill Well 1 X X X X 225 '1950 SWNW 20 22N 05E s06 lnAct 03/30/2018 Garrison Well 1 X X Y 422 500 NE SE 07 22N 05E s07 Seven Oaks Well X X X X 373 900 SWNW 28 22N 05E s08 Armstrong Springs A1 X X X X 80 420 NE NE JO 22N 05E s09 Armstrong Springs 42 X X X X oo 680 NE NE JO 22N 05E s10 N Kent Wellfield (212th & 208th)X X X X 180 5000 SE NW 07 22N 05E s11 208th Street Well X X X X X 180 1200 SE NW 07 22N 05E s12 OBrien Well X X X 192 243 SE SW 07 22N 05E s13 Well 1-212ST X X X X X 336 1200 SE NW 07 22N 05E s14 Well 2-212ST X X Y 248 1200 SE NW 07 22N 05E s15 Well 3-212ST X X Y 290 1 300 SE NW 07 22N 05E s16 Garrison Well 2 X X X X 422 600 NE SE 07 22N 05E s17 Pre-Active 0612412002 East Hill Well X X X X 216 600 SWNW 20 22N 05E s18 ArmstrongWellsl&2 X X X 66 I 300 NE NE Jb 22N 05 s19 Tacoma Water (2nd supply)86800 N X X 8778 00N 00E s20 Highline lntertie (1)40650 6 X 1 040 00N 00E s21 Auburn lntertie ('1)03350 V X 200 00N 00E s22 Renton lntertie (1)71850 L X X 1 800 00N 00E s23 Soos Creek lntenie ('l)40100 I X 700 00N 00E s24 Lake Meridian water oist $f f!)41900 B X X 1 400 00N 00E s25 Tukwila ('1)89500 F X X 2360 00N 00E DOH 331-01 1 (Rev. 06/03)DOH Copy Page: 2 WATER FACILITIES INVENTORY (WFl) FORM - Continued I. SYSTEMIDNO. 38150 1 2. SYSTEMNAME KENT WATER DEPARTMENT 3. COUNTY KING 4. GROUP A I' TYPE Comm ACTIVE SERVICE CONNF(]TIONS DOH USE ONLY CATCULATED ACTIVE CONNECTIONS ]OH USE ONLY APPROVED CONNECTIONS 25. SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCES (How many of the foltowing do you have?)30539 Unsp€cified A. Full Time Single Family Residences (Occupied 180 days or more per year)11335 B. Part Time Single Family Residences (Occupied less than 180 days per year)0 28. MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS (How many of the fonowtng do you have?) A. Apartment Buildings, condos, duplexes, barracks, dorms 1602 B Full Time Residential Units in the Apartments, Condos, Duplexes, Dorms lhat are occupied more than 180 days/year 19204 C. PartTimeResidential UnitsintheApartments,Condos,Duplexes,DormsthatareoccupiedlessthanlSOdays/year 0 27. NON-RESIDENTIAL CONNECTIONS (How many of the followtng do you have?) A. Recreational Services and/or Transient Accommodations (Campsites, RV sites, hotel/motel/overnight units)13 13 B. lnstitutional, Commercial/Business, School, Day Care, lndustrial Services, etc.2306 2306 28. TOTAL SERVTCE CONI{ECnONS 32858 29, FULL.TIi,IE RESIDENTIAL POPULANON A. How many residents are served by this system 180 or more days per year?69841 30. PART.TIME RESIDENTIAL POPULATION JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP ocT t'lOV DEC A. How many part-time residents are present each month?o o o o o o o o o 0 o 0 B. How many days per month are they present?0 o o o o o o o 0 0 o o 31. TEII'IPORARY & TRANSIENT USERS JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUl{JUL AUG SEP ocT NOV DEC A. How many total visitors, attendees, travelers, campers, patienls or customers have access to the water system each month?bolita bI,k (Aflat 4r& Frtlot (4iltc tfl,7a (Aflg , L9.-7r. a1;7a 2 (4nu a;n B. How many days per month is water accessible lo the public?il 7,b jl jo jt jo jl 3t 3o 3l 3D 3l 32. REGULAR NON-RESIDENTIAL USERS JAN FEB MAR APR IIAY JUN JUL AUG SEP ocT NOV DEC A. lf you have schools, daycares, or businesses connected to your water system, how many students daycare children and/or employees are present each month?bftoo btUc b;24 latU b,b bia hTtc hzd b70(Wo hza 6pec B. How many days per month are they present?7l "0 il io el i0 3l 7l 30 3t 30 3l 33. ROUTINE COLIFORM SCHEDULE ' Requirement is exception from WAC 246-290 JAN FEB MAR APR 70 70 70 70 MAY 70 JUN 70 JUL AUG 70 SEP 70 ocr 70 l{ov 7o DEC 70 34. NITRATE SCHEDULE (One Sample per source by time period) QUARTERLY ANNUALLY ONCE EVERY 3 YEARS 35. Reason for Submltllng WFI: pdate - change E upa"t" - No change ! lnactivate I Re-Activate fl Name change I rew system Eotn", 36. I certify that the SIGNATURE:DATE: PRINT NAME:TITLE:btmun is correct to the best of my knowledge. *4A 3tue,z stated on this WFI form DOH 331-01 1 (Rev 06/03)DOH Copy Page: 3 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK APPENDIX B Retail Water Service Area and Other Agreements THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 OnGItVL RESOLUTION NO 2 5 6 8 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF AUBURN WASHINGTON AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SOUTH KING COUNTY REGIONAL WATER ASSOCIATION JOINT OPERATING AGREEMENT BETWEEN PARTICIPATING CITIES OF KENT BLACK DIAMOND AUBURN COVINGTON WATER DISTRICT AND KING COUNTY WATER DISTRICT NO 111 WHEREAS pursuant to RCW 3934 entitled the Interlocal Cooperation Act the City of Auburn is authorized to enter into agreements with other public agencies to provide for the most efficient services and WHEREAS an adequate and safe water supply for SOuth King County Regional Water Association SKRWA is vital to both existing citizens and the longterm comprehensive plans of SKRWA and WHEREAS the State and SKRWA have prepared a Coordinated Water System Plan CWSP for South King County and WHEREAS projects that provide for the joint use and operation of supply transmission storage treatment and pumping facilities to minimize cost provide for improved water quality protect the environment provide for emergency needs and maximize the best use of the resource is in the best interest of the citizens of the region NOW THEREFORE THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF AUBURN WASHINGTON IN A REGULAR MEETING DULY ASSEMBLED HEREWITH RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS Resolution No 2568 May 15 1995 Page I 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2O Section The Mayor and City Clerk of the city are hereby authorized to execute South King County Regional Water Association Joint Operating Agreement A copy of said Agreement is attached hereto denominated as Exhibit A and made a part hereof as though set forth in full herein Seotion 2 The Mayor is hereby authorized to implement such administrative procedures as may be necessary to carry out the directives of this legislation DATED and SIGNED this 5th day of June 1995 ATTEST Robin Wohlhueter City Clerk 21 APPROVED AS TO FORM Michael J Reynolds City Attorney24 25 26 CITY OF AUBURN Resolution No 2568 May 15 1995 Page 2 CHARLES A BOOTH Mayor SOUTH KING COUNTY REGIONAL WATER ASSOCIATION JOINT OPERATING AGREEMENT January 1995 WHEREAS an adequate and safe water supply for South King County Regional Water Association SKCRWA is vital to both existing citizens and implementing the longterm comprehensive plans of SKCRWA and WHEREAS the State and SKCRWA prepared a Coordinated Water System Plan CWSP for South King County and WHEREAS projects that provide for the joint use and operation of supply transmission storage treatment and pumping facilities to minimize cost provide for improved water quality protect the environment provide for emergency needs and maximize the best use of the resource is in the best interest ofthe citizens of the region WHEREAS the current and nearterm water needs of the local governments and SKCRWA require steps to establish a cooperative subregional water supply system and WHEREAS the SKCRWA is committed to cooperate toward regional solutions for long range water supply needs NOW THEREFORE the SKCRWA members as the initial developers of this Joint Operating Agreement JOA agree as follows 1 GENERAL The Members acknowledge the requirement to incorporate land use planning as defined by the Growth Management Act with water supply planning and The Members recognize the benefits of developing a subregional water supply system that will allow the optimum use of surface and groundwater to better manage and protect the areas water resources and The Members will hold a joint meeting at least annually about September 30th to review the status of this JOA and any Amendments as well as other problems of mutual concern The specific date time and location of the meeting will be set by mutual agreement Exhibit A Resolution No 2568 January 13 1995 1 43960joadoc INTENT Ao Bo Co Do Bo The general intent of the Members is to cooperatively provide the additional facilities needed to develop a South King County Subregional Water Supply System Subregional System The Members may choose by Interlocal Agreement to produce additional water and distribute it within the Subregional System with or without change to their retail service area The JOA provides a framework for joint development of specific projects that may include two or more of the Participants Each facility project andor intertie shall be developed under a separate Intedocal Agreement IA consistent with this JOA subject to approval by appropriate affected city council andor water district boards The specific intent of this JOA is to make provisions for a standardized method to create or expand the Subregional System to meet the public water supply needs for both emergency and longterm use and to establish a basis for agreement between the Participants for financing ownership construction and operation of projects required for the Subregional System These projects may include common facilities with other Agencies outside the SKCRWA It is further the specific intent of this JOA to preserve existing water rights and protect the established or planned interest and needs of each Participant with respect to sources of water Exhibit A is a suggested content of what should be included in each Interlocal Agreement It is the desire of the Members that this JOA be incorporated into the South King County CWSP at the next update The term Participant as used in this JOA shall mean all the signatories of an IA consistent with and implemented subsequent to this JOA The term members as used in this JOA shall mean all the members of the SKCRWA whether they have signed this JOA or not SUBREGIONAL SUPPLY SYSTEM AND SERVICE AREA A Subregional System shall mean a that portion ofthe Participants sources interties transmission and storage systems required to supply water to the service area of the Participants or new facilities as defined by a separate IA January 13 1995 2 43960joado Bo those designated capacities within a Participant defined in the appropriate IA system as specifically Service Area of the Subregional System shall mean the Participants Designated Water Service Areas identified in the CWSP as shown on Exhibit B or as approved by amendments to the CWSP or the Participants Comprehensive Water Plan Facility Ownership Ownership of the physical facilities that exist on the date of this JOA shall remain with the individual Participants Unless otherwise agreed to within a specific IA ownership and operational responsibilities of new facilities shall be based generally on location in designated service areas with capacity rights defined by appropriate IA WATER SUPPLY CAPACITY RIGHTS Ao Capacity Rights Each Participant may purchase capacity in planned improvements to the Subregional System Any changes in these capacity rights shall be recognized by an IA approved by the appropriate affected city councils andor water district boards Additional JOA Participants Other agencies may purchase capacity rights in the Subregional System with consent of the SKCRWA Such consent shall not be unreasonably withheld If other agencies become a JOA Participant in future projects past costs recognized by the JOA including but not limited to cost associated with development of this JOA Water Rights negotiations and any Feasibility Studies will be assessed to the new agency Wholesaling Water The Participants may wholesale water through lease or otherwise delivered through the Subregional System to areas outside of Participantsrespective Service Area so long as the other Participants capacity rights are not negatively impacted Members of the SKCRWA shall have right of first refusal for excess capacity which would be sold to nonmembers Conservation and Curtailment All Participants will develop and implement a conservation plan that is consistent with State guidelines and will incorporate guidance to ensure that their program is compatible with the Conservation Plan implemented by the source of supply agency In addition if a source of supply agency develops and implements a curtailment plan all purchasers shall develop and implement a compatible curtailment plan Quality An objective of the Members is to maintain the quality of the water in the Subregional System at or above the quality required by the State drinking water standards The purchasing Participant will be responsible for ensuring water quality blending analyses and other water quality issues are resolved to their own January l3 1995 3 43960oLdoc Fo satisfaction The Participants will meet periodically to ensure that water quality and operational issues are addressed and that needed information is exchanged in a timely fashion The written results ofthese meetings will be circulated in a timely manner to all members and participants and reviewed at the annual meeting Additional Facilities Projected needs will be identified by the Participants based on the Participantsdesignated service areas As five or more years may be needed to bring major new source capacity capabilities on line fiveyear and tenyear forecasts are required and must be updated whenever a Participant becomes aware of any significant change in their forecast demand These will be discussed jointly as they arise and reviewed at the annual meeting Financing Each Project IA will include pertinent details of financing for that project Financial participation in existing and additional facilities will be based on each Participantsprojected need for each facility as designated capacity rights Cost of Service Charge The Members and Participants will establish wholesale water sales charges for both emergency and longterm supply that include 1 capital cost 2 fixed operating cost and 3 a variable operating cost based on quantity ofwater delivered based on actual costs ofproviding the service Fixed and variable operating and maintenance costs payments will be made monthly per meter and use rates Projected annual rate adjustments and documentation shall be provided at the annual meeting Any rate increase will be effective beginning January 1 of the following year 0 The Rates and Charges for the capital operation and maintenance of the system shall be based on the following a Capital Cost Those construction related costs incurred for Capacity Rights Capital Costs for facilities contracted solely for a specific project described in an IA are allocated based on designated capacity to be purchased Capital costs shall include the debt service for each Participant Such debt service shall be defined as the actual debt service on debt issued for the Participantsproportionate share of capacity rights or if no debt is issued for the Participantscosts by the financing Participant the amortized value at the interest rate of the most recent revenue bond issued by the financing Participant over 20 years However should all capital costs be paid in full by any Participant purchasing capacity rights prior to the time of the financing Participant incurring the costs no interest charges shall be assigned to the Participant purchasing capacity rights January 13 1995 4 43960joadoc b Capital Costs associated with a supplying Participantsconstruction of their internal water system facilities may be included in the fixed and variable operating costs as appropriate using cost of service principles in the same manner as those costs are included in the supplying Participantscustomer rate base c Fixed Operating Cost The cost of labor supervision supplies utilities services taxes insurance and all other costs required to operate and maintain the system other than those items included under Variable Operating Cost The operating cost will include an allocation for renewal and replacement Variable Operating Cost Those costs directly proportionate to the volume of water produced including chemicals electric power and other costs required to meet customer and system needs not included in a and b above 2 Accounting Subregional System accounting shall be documented in accordance with generally accepted accounting practices acceptable to the Participants ADMINISTRATIVE LEGAL AND OTHER PROVISIONS Each Participant shall designate in writing their representative responsible for coordination and implementation of the JOA and the subsequent IAs The designated individuals will be the primary contact for all project approvals and communication and shall prepare and publish a schedule and plan to facilitate the planning design and daybyday operation of facilities associated with the JOA An Annual Meeting of the Members and Participants shall be held to review past activity and to propose efforts that may lead to further Amendments to this JOA Bo This JOA shall remain in full force unless terminated by mutual agreement Any Member may request Amendment to this JOA at any time with approval subject to SKCRWA Bylaws January 13 1995 5 43960joadoc IN WITNESS WHEREOF the SKCRWA members hereto have caused this alreement to be executed by their proper Officers on theTt day of 199Q Title Mayor Charles A Booth City ofAuburn Attest Robin Wohlhueter City Clerk Aprioved As To Form blichael J Reynolds City Attorney City ofBlack Diamond Attest By Approved As To Form By Attest Title Y Jyr7 Covington Water District By Approved As To Form By January 13 1995 6 43960joadoc Attest Approved As To Form By King County Water District 11 i Approved As To Form By By Title Date Attest By Approved As To Form By January l3 1995 7 43960oadoc By Title Date Attest By Approved As To Form By By Title Date Attest By Approved As To Form By January l3 1995 8 43960oadoe EXHIBIT A SOUTH KING COUNTY REGIONAL WATER ASSOCIATION JOINT OPERATING AGREEMENT CHECKLIST FOR INTERLOCAL AGREEMENTS Project Title General List of Utilities to be Parties to the Inteflocal Agreement IA and approval of appropriate city councils andor water district boards Consistency with Joint Operating Agreement JOA 121 Description of need for project 21 Listing of potential Wholesale customers for water per Section 4C ofthe JOA rn Recognition of assessment of costs associated with development of JOA per Section 4B of the JOA tn Recognition South King County Regional Water Association SKCRWA members have right offirst refusal on excess capacity per Section 4C of the JOA 121 Recognition that capacity and water rights are available to meet the needs ofthe IA Description of the Project Inclusion of a drawing or description which identifies all the facilities to be considered within the IA Included within the description should be all jointly and solely owned facilities that are to be operated or paid for by a Party to the IA The information within the description should include the following 21 Longterm ownership of the facility Party responsible for longterm maintenance of the facility Party responsible for payment for design and construction for the facility Project Costs Financing and Capacity Rights Description of all project costs and the allocation to each Party 121 Definition of Capacity rights for all facilities January 13 1995 1 43960ExhibAdoc Definition of cost sharing for longterm maintenance for each facility Definition of methods ofreimbursement for monies expended if required IZI Description of any applicable latecomer fees or hookup charges IZI Description of requirements for record keeping and monitoring of costs 121 Description of manner to finance project and to pay for purchased water including initial costs and method to adjust costs over time Project Design and Construction Management Definition of overall project management responsibilities 1 Definition of design and construction management responsibilities for individual facilities Description of basic periodic meeting schedule for project review Conditions of Service II Limitations to source sharing or delivery ofwater if any Design Criteria for full project rn Minimum and maximum flow rates and pressures Items specifically excluded from the project Term of Duration of the Agreement Discussion of the length of time the agreement is in effect as well as the method to terminate the agreement and succeeding agencies obligations Amendments Methods by which the agreement could be amended Hold harmless liability language etc January 13 1995 2 43960ExhibAdoe ('l ) ) WATER SUPPLY AGREEMENTS GITY OF TAGOMA AND SECOND SUPPLY PARTNER AGREEMENTS MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT AMONG TTIE SECOND SUPPLY PROJECT PARTICIPANTS, TIIE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTTT CONCERNING COORDINATED PLANNING A}ID MÄNAGEMENT OF WATER RESOURCES RECITALS WHEREAS, the Cities of Tacoma, Kent, and Seattle, the Covington Water Distict, and theLakehaven Utility Dishict (hereafter "Project Participants') havã entered or intend to enter aseries of agreements conceming the second supply rroject Agreement; and WHEREAS, said Agreement will involve diversion and use of water under Tacoma,s SecondDiversion Water Right, as well as additional water storage at Howard Hanson Dam, andinclusion of a bra¡rch pipeline to connect the Second Suppfy Pipeline to the Seattle water system;and WHEREAS, the corurection of the Proiect Participants' supply systems will make possible moreefficient use of existing water supply **r"r, and provide opportunities for the development ofregional water supply, water conservatiorL and fish enhancement programs; and WHEREAS, the Washington State Deparhnents of Ecology (DOE) and Health @OH) haveresponsibilities for management of water resources to meet a variety of public needs, includingenvironmental protection, and protection of public health and wel-úeini ty ¿r¡¡surance of safe,adequate, and reliable supplies of drinking water; and WHEREAS, all of the Partigg to this agreement, which include the project participants and DoHand DOE, believe that coordinated planning and management of water resources will contributeto their responsibilities for meeting the fr¡tu* needs ofioth fish and peoptef AGREEMENT NO'W, THEREFORE, the parties agree as follows: l' The Project Participants commit to coordinated management and planning of their waterresources within all_3rea that encompasses the authorize¡l=place of usã of watä under Tacoma,ssecond Diversion water Right, as rhown in the third perniit extension. 2' The Project Participants agree to work with the Cenhal Puget Sound Water Suppliers, Forum(hereafter "Forum'), or similarmechanism, to develop regionãl water supply and demandprojections and to continue to work with the Forum'sìoniervation *ort'gróup, or similarmechanism, to develoq *td implement effective conservation methodolofres -¿ to establishdata reporting and performancè measurements. September 25,2001 ¿- 3. The Project Participants agree to coordinate in developing their water system plans, and participate in other regional water supply planning activities in cenûal Puget Sound. 4. The Project Participants agree to promote increased water use efficiency, including achieving a cumulative aggregate (total retail and wholesale) reduction in water use by l07o over a ten year period beginning January 1, 2000. This requires a l07o reduction in projected levels of consumptíon by January 1,2011 using the year 2000 consumption rates as a basis for projections. The Project Participants' conservation program will: a) Be measured using acce,pted professional practices for conservation evaluation, including normalizing for weather, assessing large or atlpical new demands, and accounting for economic and demographic changes. b) Be reviewed on a biennial basis by the parties to this agreement except that the utility conservation program may be reviewed more often by DOH if required under chapter 246- 290 WAC. c) Provide verifiable evaluation results that include detailed documentation, full disclosure of data and methodology, and professional peerreview. The procedures and requirements for review and evaluation of the conservation program and the specific methodologies to be used to calculate the l0o/o reduction are included in Attachment A to this Agreement. Attachment A is incorporated into this Agreement by reference as if fully set forth herein. The Project Participants will conduct a conservation potential assessment, if they have not already done so, within the boundaries of their respective planning areas, and will collaborate to identiff and quantiÛ the cost of water conservation opportunities in the aggregate area. The Project Participants will, as necessary, amend their individual water system plans pursuant to WAC 246-290-100 to reflect these conservation activities, as supported by the conservation potential assessments, and submit the amendments to DOH. They will submit conservation plan amendments, conservation potential assessments, and consumption and use data to DOH for review as water system plan aurendments. The initial amendments will be submitted to DOH priorto the first biennial review. They will also continue to report annually to DOH their sowce water production and use data as required in rü[AC 246-290480. The Parties agree that DOH will be the lead agency for monitoring performance pursuant to this Section 4. As described in Section III.C of the attached Methodology, the Project Participants will submit the final report of evaluation results to DOH. After conferring Ì\'ith DOE, DOH will respond in writing to the Project Participants with its assessment of ñ¡lfiltment of the terms of this Section 4. During the period of this MOA and thereafter, the Project Participants remain committed to meet all water conservation obligations set forth by state statute and regulations, including any changes to those statutes and regulations. September 25,2OOl 5. The Parties to this agreement agree to work jointly to develop practical and effective local andregional altematives to resolve identified sfreamflowproblems ieiulting from water supply operations that adversely impact threatened or endangered fish. The paiies also agree toparticipate in a biennial review to assess and report progrss in implementing rpoìfi" projects and/or solutions to identified problems. FY{o'the parties believe that within the place of use of the Second Supply project, potential solutions for these problems may include applying as appropriate the U"nån"iaf results of conservation and reuse programs, conjunctive use of s*iäd and ground water, regional hansmission and delivery systems, and water storage projects. The parties futtúrt agree to cooperate in identiSinq and addressing regulatory, finanðial, and other obstacles thãt may hinder or prevent implementation of appropriate solutions. 6. Nothing in this Agreement limits or supplants the regulatory authorities of the state agencies. 7. In the event of a{ dispute arising between or arnong Parties to this agreement conceming its implementation, the Parties agree to work together in gıod faith to resolie such disput.r, *Irrg the dispute resolution procedures set forttr in this sectiın, or such other procedur"s üpon which the parties may later agree a) Any Party wishing to resolve a dispute under this Agreement shall notis the other Parties by setting fofh its position in writing, including ".p."ifi" description of ttre situation it wishes to address, the reasons why it believès certain actions or conditions constitute a violation 9{ttt. Agreement (if that is the contention), and the actions it wishes a Party or parties to t¿ke. The state agencies shall meet and confer with each other before either agency ínitiates dispute resolution. b) The Party or Parties from whom action is requested will have 60 calendar days, or such other time as may be agreed, to respond. During this time the Party or parties r"rionaitrg may seek clarification of the information provided in the initial notice. fn" irriti"ting f"try *i-tt use its best efforts to provide responsive information. c) Within 60. c¿lenda¡ days after a response is provided or was due from the responding Parfy or Parties, whichever occurs firsÇ reprasenøtives of the Parties having authority tã resolie the dispute will meetand negotiate in good faith toward a solution satisfactãry to alt Þarties, orwill establish a specific process and timetable to seek such a solution. d) If any issues cannot be resolved through such negotiations, the parties will considernon-binding mediation or other altemative dispute resolutiın processes and, if a dispute resolution process is agreed upon, witt make gãod faith efforts to resolve all remaining issuesthrough that process. In the event that mediation is pursued, the med^iator shall be selóted by theParties within 30 calendar days of the Parties'agreernent to pursue mediation, and the pro""r, concluded within an additional 60 calendar days, unless the Parties otherwise agree. Costs shall be shared equally by all Parties to the dispute. Septembcr 25,2001 e) Any Party to this agreement may enforce its provisions by initiating an action for arbination pursuant to chapter 7.04 RCW. No such action may be initiated until the party has exhausted the informal dispute resolution procedures of a) throughd) above. The parties to the dispute agree to share equally the cost of the arbiûator(s). Regulatory compliance and enforcement matters that may arise between the Project Participants and the state agencies are not part of this Agreement and are not subject to and shall not be submitted to arbitation. 8. This MOA shall take effect on the effective date of the third permit extension to Tacoma's Second Diversion Water Right. Performance of the Parties relative to Sections I through 5 shall remain in effect until January l,20ll except that the Project Participants reporting requirement will remain in effect pursuant to Appe,ndix A. Before or after the close of the reporting period described in Appendix A, III.C, DOH will evaluate performance regarding fulfillment of the terms of Section 4 of the MOA and provide a letter to the Project Participants indicating either satisfactory or unsatisfactory results. In the event DOH finds results to be unsatisfactory, dispute resolution procedures may be initiated by DOH or the Parties may agree upon appropriate mear¡ures to be takenby the Project Participants to address the deficiencies identified. The MOA may be amended or reviewed by written agreeme,nt of all of the Parties. g' This Memorandum of Agreement executed by the following parties on October e4 ,2001: By: of Tacoma 1¿,.*¿ City o Approved as to form: \üater District I Scptember 25,2001 City Kent Lakehaven Utility District By:By: Approved as to form: By: as to washington state Department of Health rüashington state Department of Ecolo gv By By: Approved as to form:form: By: By: By: ATTACHMENT A TO MEMORANDUM OF AGRBEMENT AMONG THE sEcoND SUppLy PROJECT PARTICIPAÀrTS, THE \TASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMEhTT OF ECOLOGY, A¡ID THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ITEALTII CONCERNING COORDINATED PLAI\IIING AI\ID MANAGEMENT OF \ilATER RESOURCES Procedures, Requirements, and Methodology for Demonstrating Compliance with Water-Use Efficiency Provision As part of the discusÈions with respect to Tacoma's Second Supply Project (SSP), the Cities of Tacom4 Kent and Seaffle, Covingfon'Water Distict, Lakehaven Utility District ('?roject Participants'), and the WashingtoS State Deparfrnents of Ecology and Health entered into a Memorandum of Agree,rnent ' (MOA) with regard to planning and management of water resources. Section 4 of the MOA addresses increased water use efficiency and achievement of "a cumulative aggregate (total retail and wholesale) reduction in water use by l0% over a te,n year period beginning January 1, 2000." This document sets forth the procedures and requirements for review and evaluation of the conservation program and the specific methodologies to be used to calculate the l0% reduction. It is an attachment to and an integral part of the MOA. This document was developed collaboratively through a series of discussions among the MOA parties during April - June 2001. Attachment I to this document lists the individuals who participated in these discussions. I. General Assumptions In the course of developing this document, the following general assumptions were identified. These assumptions shall be used to guide the analysis ultimately carried out to document the l0% reduction in water use. A. The l0% reduction is understood to apply to the five partrers' "cumulative, aggregate" water use. Cumulative, aggregate water use is understood to mean total water use by all five Project Participants together, and is the sum of their total system uses, including all retail billed sales, wholesale billed sales, and non- revenue uses or losses. The combined water production of the five partrers may provide a convenient measure of cumulative, aggregate water use. ¡ "Memorandum ofAgreement Among the Sccond Supply Project Participants, the Washington State DeparErnent of Ecology, and the lvVasbingron Statc Dcpartnrent of Health C.oncerning Coordinated planning and Management of \\¡ater Resources" IScptember 25,2001 B. The Project Participants may use the simplest, lowest-cost method necessary todemonshate achievement of the 10% cumulative aggregate reduction in water use' so long as that method is consistent with a"c"ptea professional practices. C. Because conditions may change in unforeseen ways between the time this methodology was developed and the year20l0,it is reasonable and desirable topermit flexibility in the methodology ultimately used to demonstrate achievement of the l0% reduction. Therefore, this document identifies various options in the evaluation methodology. Any one of the options identified (see below) will be deemed acceptable in demonshating achievement of the loyo reduction, so long as it conform* otth accepted practices and incorporates the major influónces on water use in the Project Participants' service areas. At the time tUe evaluation is performed, the Project Participants may select the desired option, based on service area conditions and changes, availability of data to perform the measurement, and cost-effectiveness of collecting and, analyzing data under the various options listed. It is noted that Peer Review will be used to validate the methodålogy, unless this requirernent is waived under Section m.B. D- The parties to the MOA recognize that in some cases changes in water use by individual customers that purchase large quantities of watei may have a disproportionate effect on the measur"i of overall water-use efñciency (e.g. water use per capit4 or water use per employee). These large changes in wátÈr ir, -"ybe caused by events such as a service to a new customer wittr higb water use; discontinuation of service to an existing customer; an increase or decrease in production by an existing customer, with a concomitant change in water use; or a change in production methods or equipment within a customer's faciþ. Changes in water use associated with individual, large customers may úe relevant to water-use efficiency, or may be unrelated to water-use efficiency. Because of the potential impact associated with such changes, and becaus" "uãh hrg. customer has I'nique attributes, water use data on large-water using r"*î¡¡¡tr 1r.g.those using 100,000 gallons per day or more) will be separated nom ttre rest of the water use data used in this methodology (see firtheidiscussion below¡- E. It is recognized that statutes, rules, codes, ordinances and guidelines est¿blished by the- federal government, Washington State, and/or tocat.¡urisdictions maycontribute towards reductions in water use. For example, both the 1992 Washingfon State and the 1993 Federal Plumbing Coáes contain efficiency standards for certain tlpes of plumbing equipment. Any water savings athibutable to such statutes, codes, etc. mãy be includeã in the cumuiative, aggregate savings in water use discussed by this document. F. It is recognized that the l0% reduction refers to decreased water use resulting from improved water-use efficiency. 2 Sçtember 25,2001 G. The Project Participants will work together to produce a single analysis and a single report documenting the reduction in cumulative, aggregate water use. It is acknowledged that the data collected by each Project Participant may vary due to the nature of the water systems involved and the billing systems used. The analysis will document significant differences in the data collected for the five Project Participants, to the extent such differences may have an impact on the results of the evaluation. H. Nothing in this document or the remainder of the MOA establishes the methodology or decisions that DOH or Ecology must use or rnake in determining appropriate conservation activities for futr¡re review of water system plans or water right decisions. II. Evaluation Methodology A. Time Period for Measuring Results The parties to the MOA concur that reductions in srunmer season water use are the most important aspect of regional water conservation programs, both in terms of managing water production and delivery systems and in terms of potential environmental benefits. Therefore, for the purposes of demonstrating the l0% reduction, "cumulative, aggregate water use" will be measured in terms of seasonal, average day water use, computed for the 4-5 month peak season from late spring through early fall. The parties to the MOA concur that achievnga L0% reduction in summer season water use will serve the overall purposes of the MOA. rilhile l0% savings may also be achieved in year-round, average day water use, this is not required to satisff the terms of the MOA. However, the year- round, average day water use in years 2000 and 2010 will be calculated and reported for informational purposes. In accordance with Section 4 of the MOA, the only responsibility defined for the Project Participants after the term of this MOA is that they'temain committed to meet all obligations set forth by State statute and regulations." B. Normalizing for Growth It is anticipated that the service areas of the five Project Paficipants will experience considerable growth in population and related dønographic variables from year 2000 to 2010. Therefore, the measure of water use to be used in calculating the 10% reduction will be normalized for growth. Normalization may be performed by measuring overall water use per capita; or water use in different customer categories per capita, per household, per employee, per dollar of economic production, etc. If these measures are calculated by the Project Participants in performing the evaluation, they will be included in the report. 3September 25,2001 C. Changes in Use by Large Water-using Customers Significant changes in water use associated with individual large customers may occur during the 2000 -2010 time period. For purposes of this evalùatior¡ such customers are defined as those using 100,000 gallons per day or more at a single location or facility (whether served by one service connection or multiple service connections). Such changes in water use (increases or decreases) may occ,.r due to initiation oirrr* service to an individual customer; discontinuation of service to an individual customer; changes in the level ofproduction by an individual industrial customer; changes in production methods and equipment; specific water-use efficiency initiatives; otãthg iactors. Depending on the circumstances, such changes may count towards the l0% reduction in water use by the Project Participants, or may be considered a separate event that is unrelated to achievement of the l0% reduction. Therefore, water use data associated with large water-using customers will be provided separately from the remaining water use data provided for biennial and final reviews. Changes in water use by these customers dwing the 2000 - 2010 time period will be cvaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine their impact on achievingthe llo/oreduction in water use. D. Statistics to be Reported In order to veri$ conservation savings, the Project Participants will employ and report certain statistics for year 2000 and for year 2010. Generalìy, each statistic will be reported ris an aggregate value for all five systems together. However, in some cases, the nature and availability of the data may require reporting statistics separately by utility. The statistics to be used and reported will de,pend to some extent on the final choice of method (see Computational Methods, below). However, regardless of which method is selected, the following statistics will be reported to document and facilitate understanding of the results: o Total water useo Total population¡ Per-capita water use (total use divided by population)o Total Residential water use. Single-family residential water use. Multi-family residential water useo Total non-residential water useo Total Commercial water useo Total Industrial water useo Total Governme¡rt water useo Water use by individual large customers (defined herein as customers using at least 100,@0 gallons per day at a single facility, on an average annual basii. In some cÍ¡ses, this may involve reporting total consumption-measured by multiple meters serving a single facility)o Total non-revenue water (water that is produced but not included in metered sales) 4September 25,2001 a A breakdown of non-revenue water into "accounted-for" and 'l¡naccounted- for" categories (it is recognized that these categories will require estimation, since they are generally not directly measurable). The additional statistics listed below will be reported, only if they a¡e used in the calculation of the l0% savings: ¡ Total number of households served¡ Number of single-family and multi-family households servedo Average residential water use per householdo Average waten use per single-family household¡ Average water use permulti-family householdr Total number of non-residential accormtso In the non-residential category, average water use per employee or per capita (if per capita, the non-residential water use will be divided by the residential population) o Changes in the nature of non-residential accounts that have significant effects on non-residential water use.o Percent non-revenue \¡vater, expressed as a percentage of total system water use (i.e. [non-revenue] divided by [retail plus wholesale plus non-revenue]). Where significant and necessary to understand the analysis performed, a narrative description will be provided of differences among the five Project Participants regarding the way these statistics are defined or calculated (e.g. differences in how single-family and multifamily customer categories are defined with respect to duplexes, mobile home parks, goup housing, etc., if significant to understanding the analysis and results). The demographic information will be derived from U.S. Census data and/or an accepted source that processes Census Data for regional applications (e.g. the Puget Sound Regional Council). It is desirable that information derived from year2010 Census data be included. However, in the event such information is not available in a timely fashion, other generally accepted sources may be used (e.g. data or projections produced by the State of Vfashingtor¡ or documented in approved water system plans of the Project Participants, etc.) so long as the information used reflects conditions in year 2010. Demographic data will be processed as needed to cover the respective retail and wholesale service areas of the five Project Participants, using an accepted professional methodology. Following the effective date of the MOA, the Project Participants will work together to collect the applicable data and statistics for year 2000. The Project Participants will store this information in a format and location that erisures it u¡ill be readily available when the evaluation is performed (i.e. after year 2010). 5September 25,2001 E. Factors Affecting Water Use Water use is affected by a number of factors. With regard to the retail and wholesaleservice areas of the five Project Participants, some of these are under the direct control oft{e Project Participants, while others are not. The following set of factors will be addressed explicitly_in the analysis. For each factor, the project participants will determine whether they believe the factor has a significant iirpact on aåhievement of the l0olo reduction, and whether analysis is feasible and relevant given available data and theevaluation rnethod selected for the analysis. Each factor deemed both significant andfeasible/relevantw'ill be included in the analysis. Evaluation of the signiãcance andappropriateness of each factor and a descriplion of how they were *ø in adjusting water use values will be included in the report. If a factor is deemed significant but not feasible or relevant, then the Projeg_t Participants will explain why this is io, and will provide ana¡rative describing the effects of that factor in qualitative terms. Factors Affecting Water Use: o 'Weather conditions;o Population and emplo¡rment (or related demographic factors);o Large new residential loads (such as MasterPlanned Developments) ' Change-s in use by large customers (e.g. those with average daily consumption of 100,000 gallons or more);t Large changes in the nature of non-residential water use, including large new customer loadso Water rates (e.g. weighted average of rates paid by a "t5pical" household or business)o System practices (e.g. main flushing, reservoir management, etc. for waterqualify or system operation requirements; significanirepairs and replacement of mains or transmission rines, other infrastucture impacts, etc.) The Project Participants may also address additional factors not on this list, if thePt9:""! Participants believe they have a significant impact on achievement ofthe l0%reduction. If additional factors are included, the Project Participants shall clearly definethem and explain why they are appropriate for this evaluation. If the results of the evaluation show that water use was not reduced by l}yo,and if the lroject Participants believe that factors outside their control precludá achiávement ofthe l0% reduction, they shall provide a detailed explanationàf thæ" factors, and howthey affected water use dwing the time period reviåwed. If Ecology arrd rtealttr concurwith this explanation, an allowanc" -"y be made for these factorsl-ta¡cing into account the level of water savingsactually achiåved, and the good faith efforts oitfp project Participants in implementing conservation efforts, inðtuding the scope ana magnitude ofconservation programs. 6 September 25,2001 F. ComputationalMethods It is generally understood that the Project Participants will use the simplest and most cost- effective methodology possible to veriff the savings achieved and meet standards of accepted professional methods. The Project Participants may use any one of the following approaches. Regardless of the methodológ:y used, the fro¡-ect participants will provide statistics adequate to illushate the savings achieved, and wiil address the factors described above as necessary to compute savings. In addition, the results of Method Iwill be reported, regardless of which method is used to document achievement of the l0% reduction. Method l: Simple comparison of water use per capita. If this method is selected, th_e Proþt Participants will compare total, aggregaie water use per capita in year 2000 with that in year 2010 and document the percent change. Supporting document¿tion will be provided with regard to the data used and factors emptoyea in the methodology. Method 2: Comparisonof actual water use in year 2010, with projected water use in 2010 assuming no conservation efforts and other signific-ani factors. The approach will estimate what consumptionwould have been in the absence of conservation efforts. If Method 2 is selected, the adjusûnent will be based on simple mathematical techniques, rather than detailed statistical methods. Supporting documentation will be provided with regard to the data used, factors employed in the methodology (see "Factors Affecting v/ater IJse,', above), and calculations. Under Method 2,if A represents actual use, and E represents the estimate of what consumption would have been, the percent reduction in water use will be calculated as follows: Reduction : (E-A)|E Method 3: The same as Method 2 except that if Method 3 is selected, statistical techniques such as regression analysis may be used to estimate what consumption would have been. III. Procedures Related to the Evaluation A. The evaluation will include detailed documentation, disclosure of dat¿ and methodologY, and will utilize accepted professipnal practices prevailing at the time the evaluation is performed. The Project Participanti will proide citattns from the professional literature, State-approved V/ater System PlanJ, and/or simila¡ sowces to document that the methodology conforms with accepted practices. B. A peer review of the evaluation methodology will be performed, unless this requirement is waived by all of the parties to the MoA. peer rwiew may be 7Septcmber 25,2W1 conducted by either a single reviewer or a panel of up to three reviewers. All of theparties to the MOA must agree on the peeireview".ã, p"", review panel selected forthis activity. If conducted, the peer review will address the technir.t .rpr.t of theevaluation, comprising the following points: o Whether the technique applied conforms with accepted professional practices, given the nature of this evaluation and the premises set iorth in this diocument;. whether the data used is appropriate to support the technique applied;o whether appropriate documentation of methods and data was provided;o whether the factors considered are appropriate and complete;o Whether the computations were canied out correctly; ando Whether the conclusions reached are valid and supported by the analysis and datapresented. The peer reviewer or review panel will submit a written report of their findings to allparties to the MOA. C. The evaluation will be performed rehospectively, when applicable data for year 2010 becomes available. The Project Participants wiil completäthe evaluation expeditiously an! delivgr a single report documentingfindings to DOH no later thanDecember 3l,20lz (this amount of time may be r"cãr.rry tı a[ow for 2010 Census data to be used). Within 120 days ofreceipt of the evaluaiion report, DOH, afterconsultation with-Ecology, will provide a letter either confirming ttrat ttre evaluation is satisfactory and terms of Section 4 of the MOA have been -J, o, indicating otherwise and describing any deficiencies. However, in the event a peer review process is conducted,.the 120-day time period will be extended to a iime period agreed to by the parties. D. The individual Project Participants will perform the analysis of their respective systems at their own cost and will cooperate to compile the infomrationìnto a singlereport. If outside resources are needed to compile tñe repor,,-' the costs will be sharedequitably among the Project Paficipants, proportional to ttreir respective percentageof cumulative, aggregate water use. If a pèeireview process is utilized, sbø of tneassociated costs _shall beborne by DOH and Ecologyiogether, subject to availability 9f funding; and 50%o of the associated costs shall UãUorie by the ñve project Participants together. E. In the event of any dispute arising between or among the parties to the MoAregarding implementatio¡ or completion of Section ã, th.dirpute resolutionprovisions contained in Section 7 of the MOA shall apply. 8 September 25, 20Ol Attachment I Participants Ín Development of Methodolog¡r for Demonstrating Compliance with Water-use Efficiency ProvisÍon Name Organízation Robyn Bartelt John Bowman David Brock Lynn Coleman Jane Evancho Andrew Graham John Kirner Judy Nelson DonPerry Jim Rioux Tim Skeel Anna Thurston Don Wickstrom City of Kent Lakehaven Utility District City ofKent \rVashington State Departnent of Ecology Tacoma'Water EES, representing Covington Water District Tacoma Water Covington'Water District Lakehaven Utility Dishict Washington State Deparünent of Health Seattle Public Utilities Tacoma Water City ofKent 9September 25,2001 KING GOUNTY FRANGHTSE No. i3OB3 (To operate, Maintain, Repair, and Gonstruct water Mains within Gounty Roads) April 20, i99B ) ti(t'"I 1S0Sg &,, FRANCHISE I 3083 In tlte matler of the application for a franchise to operate, maintain, repair, and construct water mains and service lines, and appurtenances in, over, along, and under County roads and rightsof-way in King County, Washington The application of the City of Kent for a franchise to operate, maintain, repair and construct water mains and service lines, and appurtenances in, over, along, and under County roads and rightp-of-way locatqd within the area described in atached Exhibit nAn has been heard on ttris PbeL day'of uI '1 ,lgJlt; All of the properry described in Exhibit nA" lies outside the limits of any incorporated Town or City. I*gal notice of ttre franchise application and of the hearing has been given as is required by law. The King County Council, having considered ttre interests proposed and advanced, and finding that ttre granting of ttris franchise is in the public interest, ORDERS that a franchise be granted to ttre City of Kent, the Grantee, subject to the conditions set forth in Exhibit nB' attached hereto, ttris franchise and Ordinance No./3ot z. This franchise grants the right, privilege, authority and franchise to operate, maintain, repair and construct mains and service lines and appurtenances S a patt of is disnibution system in, over, along, and under County roads and righsof-way located within the area described in Exhibit "A'. 1 l ) ( ;1808S II Irl*.....,rtl This franchise is grant€d subject to all of ttre temui and conditions conainedrhgrein, within Ordinance No.l'f3ndExhi6it nBn, and shall expire in nventy-five years on 4 /A0 ,20/F_ Dated thir / day of The undersigned accepts all the rights, conditions, stipulations, and obligationsnB'. nrunfi@hir privileges, and duties of this franchise subject to all terms,^contailled herein, within Ordinance /g o?Z and Exhibii KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON CITY OF KENT GRANTEE BY Dqf, ( Dated nis fr aav or J U NE , B-? tr. 2 ' .-!ts08s Exhibit "A" AREA 1 (SEE MAP # 1) Those portiorrs of Sections 23,26,27, Towns\ip n North, Range 4 East, W.M., lying westerly, loutherly,_easterly.a$lortlrerfv of Kent city limits, A\D ttrat porrion of t6e Nonireist"quut", oi Section 35, Township 22 North, Range 4 East, W.M. lying north of ttre center line oi Si,utft ZZ* Street, EXCEPT that porrion lying wittrin Kent city limifs. AREA 2 (SEE Map # 1) That portion gf Secqion-25, Township 22 North, Range 4 Fast, W.M. lying between ttre Green River and the Kent city limits. AREA 3 (SEE MAP # 2) Those portio-ns of Sections 31,32,33, Township 22 Norttr, Range 5 East, W.M., lying easterly of tlte center of the Green Rive1, lying souttrerly, easterly,, westerl/and nortirerly of tn" riirti"g frnicity limits and lying westerlV and_norttrerli, of Fg followingdescribed linL. neginning"at ttreintersection of the @nter of the Green River wittr ttre souti' line of said Sectio""li UEi"g ttr"beginning of line herein described; Thence east along the south line of said Section 32 anieast along the south line of said Section 33 to ttre north/iouth center line of said Section 33; TtrenceP$ 4gn8 said center line to a point 30 feet south of the south line of ttre north half of ihe norttrhalf of the south half of said Section 33, being the terminus of ttre line herein described. AREA 4 (SEE MAP # 3) Portion of Section 16, Township 2.2 \orth, Range 5 East, W.M., lying northerly and easterly ofthe Kent city limis and.lying sbutherly,- westerly and norttrerly of ifre"ruffowing described liire.Beginning at a_point on tle south right-of-way mirgin of S E 2+06 Sreer fving iAO feet west of theintersection of said louth right-ot:ry"y-ryargin anq *re north/south ceriter"line of Section 2i, Torynshrp 22 North, Range 5 E?st, W.M, being the beginning of the line heiein described; lt.n*north to the southwest corner of ttre east 180 feet of thJ southlwest quarter oi tt. souttrwesi drrt ;of said Section 16; Thence 1194 .long_the west line of the east 180 feet of the sourhwesr drit r;i the southwest quarter of said Section-16-to a point on the north line of said sou*rwe,st qli*d ;isouthwest quarter; F.ry west along the no-rttr line of ttre southwest qur.t"r of the southwestquarter of said Section 16 to the southeast @rner of ttre west half of the norttrwest quarter of thesouthwest quarter of-said Section 16; lh9rye prth alqgg the east line theieoi to u'point ; tlt; south line of the northwest quafier of said Seclion 16; Ttience west along ttre south line t6ereof to It,,p:, r.rght-of-way margilof 1166 Avenue S E; Thence north along fi"iia-."rr margin of thenorthwest corner of lnt 41 Terra Heig-h1s, Volume !?s_pus" 7 ttroulh 9; Thence east?ong thenorttr line ttrereof to northeast corner of mt 3l in said T;rra Heights;ih.n " . t along tftr f,"t1, Iine of said Terra Heights q a Poin! 530.50 feet west of the east liie of tt r souttrwest q,ritter of t6enorthwest quarter in said_Section 16; Thgng-ryrth parallel wittr said easili* t" apoint on thesguth line.of the plat of Hunter Run Too in Vo-h1ne i|t,_p1ge 54 through 56; Thence *ot A*t the south line thereof to the southwest corner of Tract "A"' i; said Hunte"r Run too; Thence nortfi G 3 x808s along the east right-of-way margin of 116t Avenue S E o tlre intersection with the center of S E i,igFpt^o; Td.. west along iuid c"nt"rline o the west line of northwest quart€r of said Section 16 being ttre terminus of the line herein described. AREA 5 (SEE MAP # 3) portion of Section 17, Township 22 North, Range 5 East, W.M. lying norttrerly, weste.rly , *rt"rfv of the Kent ciiy limits ana ryr1g southerly-and westgrfy of qt following described line. g"gintiing at ttre southiest corner of *re northeasi quarter of -tttg norttreast quarter of said Section fZiffrenfu norttr along ttre east line of the northwgst quarter of the northeastquarter of said Section 17 to the northeast *fir"r of the south one half of the northwest quarter of the norttreast Quarter of said Section 17; Thence west along the north line thereof a distance of approximately 1280.51' P the east line of t5e northwest quaier of said Section 17; Thence n9ry! along the east line of the northwest quarter of said Secti6n 17 to the northeast corner thereof; Thence westal_ong-the-north line of said Section 17 to the intersection of S E 2246 Sreet and Benson Road (aka SSH Number 5' Cj; ffr"n " in a souttrwesterly direction along tlte center line of said Benson Roa{ to a point of intersection wittr the south line of the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of the northwest q*tt"r of said Section 17 produced east; Thence wesl alolg said easterll, prqu."d south line to the iestertyrightof-way marlin of said Benson Road being the terminus of the line described herein. AREA 6 (SEE MAP # 3) portion of Section 17, Township 22 Norttr, Range 5 East, W.M, lying norttrgrfy and eastelly of t|t" Kent city limits and lying southerly and westerly of the following 9o:$_.0 line beginning at tttg souttreasi @rner of ttr6 n6rttwest q-uarter of the northwest quarter of said Section 17; Thence norttt along the east line of the south orie half of ttre northwest gqrter of the northwest quarter- of tttg nortf,west quarter of said Section 17 a distance of 330.77.feet to ttre northeast corner ttrereof; Thence *6t ulong the south line of the north one half of the noltrwgt quarter of ttre northwest q*. of the noftft***-qurrt"r of said Section 17 to the easterly right-irf-way margin of 1006 Avenue S E being the terminus of the line herein described. AREA 7 (SEE MAP # 1\ Those portions of Sections 25,36, Township ?? \qtttt, Rangc 4 East, SectioJr 30, Township-.22 North,^Range 5 East, and Section 31, Township 23 N9rth, Range 5 East, W.M. and including therein all Land Donation Claims and all recorded plats described as follows: Beginning at a point on the left burk of ttre Green River and the north line of the George E. King pination Clairir Number 40 being the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING of propertry-herein described; Thence heading dowrstream along said left bank of said river o a- point on ttre east right-of-way line of ttre dtricago-Milwaukee-St. Paul and Pacific Railroad right-of-way; Pg* so:utherly uiong the east line th-ereof to a point on the souttr. right-of-way mgeonpf. South 27f Sneet; itt"noJ*rterly along the south line thereotto "Polnt.on F.q*t line of ttre Northern Pacific Railroad right-of-wa! and ttre Burlington Norther_n Railroad right-of-way; Thenge nortlt along the east line fiereof o a point on thenorttr mg_ggr of said street; Thence east alongtre norttr r*[in tlrereof ro a point on thi east line of ilre R. H. Beatty Qona-1io1 ClaiT Numbers 37 and M; fnrfi6 south along the east tlrereof to the southeast cornei_of.sai{Peatty Donation Claim which point is also the noih*rst corner of the said K_ing Donation Claim; Thence east along ttre nortlr line thereof to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINMNG. 4 rs&8sd, EXHIBIT *B' TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO UTILITIES FRANCHISES GRANTED BY KING COUNTY THIS FRANCHISE is subject to rhe following terms and conditions: 1. DEFIMNONS References.tg any- Qounty official- or office also refers to any ofFrce ttrat succeeds to any or all of tfreresporsibilities of ttre named office or official. References to laws or "applicable [aws' includeftd"ryl, state, and local laws and regulations adopted pursuant to those liws; unless otherwise references to laws include lawi now in effect, as the same may be amended from time totime during the operation of this franchise. In addition, the following O!finitions shall apply: Cable Sqrvices. The term "Gble Services" is used as defined in 47 United States C6;,e 522 (5), asamended. 94te$.vstem. The_term l!{te System' is used as defined in 47 Unired Star€s Code 522 (0, andKing counry code 6.a.010 (I) as amended. County Roa4.Rights-ofiW?y.= The term _'Cogltr Road Rights-of-Way' includes any road, sfreet,avenue, or_alley located wittrin the area described in ttre attactreO Exhibit nAn, it does not'includerecreational or nature tails except where the trails intersect or are within ."0r, stre€ts, avenues oralleys. gueeot The term "Director' refers to ttre chief executive of ttre King County Depar[nent ofTraruportation. Grantee. The term nGrantee" refers to the CITY OF KENT its successors and ttrose assigneesapproved pursuant to paragraph 16 herein. Utility. 'The term "utility" refers eittrer o ttre Grantee or, depending on the context, to any other P_erqon, firm, or corporation, public or private, which maytrold a fraichise to mainain *a;pg;;similar facilities in, under, ovlr, across, and along any of the County prop"rry Oocribed in ExhibitnA". Council. The term nCounciln refers to the King County Council, acting in its official capacity. Ot{rrqr govefing Bpdy. ttt"-t"r* ]Ottrer Governing Body" refers to any public official or otlrcrpublic board or body *.may have the-po.wer qra.;uiis,aulon to permit oi ffi"tr the installationand maintenance of utilities and other ficitities in, inder, over, across, and ddng any of tfrJ rouot'property described in Exhibit "A". 5 1308S 2. ACCEPIANCE BY GRANTEES OF TERMS AND CONDMONS The full acceptance of this franchise and all of its terms and conditions shall be filed with the Clerk of tlre Council wittrin thirty (30) days from -,-}9-, by the Grantee' Full uo"ptu"." of this franchise is a *ndition pr@ffect, and unless this franchise is irobt"O within the time specified, ttris grairt will be null and void and have no force or effect. 3. NON-EXCLUSTVE FRANCHISE This franchise is not exclusive. It does not prohibit King County from granting franchises for other public or private utilities, in, under, over, across, and along any County properly, including Counry road rights-of-way. This franchise does not prevent or prohibit King County from conslructing, altering, maintaining or using any County road iigtrs-of-wiy covered by this franchise. King County reains full power to makE alichanges, relocations, repair, maintenance, etc. as it may deem fit. 4. ruRISDICTION This franchise is intended to convey limited rights and interest only a^s to those roads an{ rights- of- way in which King CounU has an actual interest. It is not a warranty of title or of interest in County road rights-of-way. Whenever any of the County road rights-of-way as designated in this franchise, by reason of.thg subsequent iniorporation of iny Town or Ciry oi extension 9f the limits of *y Town or City, shall later fill within i\e City or Town limits, thisfranchise shall continue in force and effect until such time as the incorporation and/or annexation is complete_according- to appll@le Sate law, after which time the C6unry will no longer have any responsibility for maintenance of any County roads, rights-of-way or othei County property within the area of annexation/incorporation. None of ttre rights granted to the Grantee shall affect ttre jurisdiction of King County over County road righs-of-iuuy -or ttre County's power to perform work upon its roadways, rights-of-way or upputt "n*t drainage facilities incluiing by constructing, altering, renewing, paving, widening, grading, blasting or excavating. fut of-fut" righ-ts herein grait"O shall be subject to and governed bV tl,it franchise; provided, however, thai nothing in'Uris franchise may bL construed in any ryqy as _limiting King County's rights to adopt ordirinces which are necessary to protect ttre healttr, safety and welfare of the general public. 5. REGULATION OF USE AND CONTROL This franchise does not deprive King County of any powers, rights, or privileges it now has or may later acquire in the futura to regulate the-use of and to confiol the County road righb-of-way covered by tltis franchise. This franchise authorizes the use of County righsof-way solely for ttre delivery by ttrg Grantee. of water to it customers. Additional uses of eounty rights-of-way by ttre Grantee, including for cable 6 3808S communication services, shall first require a separate franchise from King County which conformsto ttrc _reqgirements of K.C.C. 6.27 as amended, or K.C.C. 6.271i as amlnded, and other applicable law. Any use of the.Grantee's-equipment of facilities in County rights-of-way by others, including for telecommunication or cable mmmunication services, is prohibited unless sefarately auttrorized-and approved in writing b.y King Cogn-ry._ The Grantee agees that prior to auttrorizitig .ny person to use the Grantee's equipment or facilities located in Cognty rights-of-way, ttre Graritee iviil require ttre user-to provide the Grantee wittr an affidavit that it has obtained ttre necessary franchise or otltrt Pprovql from the County to operate qd provide ttre proposed service in County rights-of-way. At E*t ttt"ty (30) day prior to executing any agreemenf wittr a potential user-for-ttre use of *r. 9tg*l't equipment or facilities, the Grantee shall fax ttre affidivit to ttre King County Office of Cable Communication at 20!29ffi842. 6. EMINENT DOMAIN This franchise and ttre limited righls and interests for the operation, maintenan@, repair, and construction of Grantee's transmission and service lines and appurtenances ap suU.leit to the exercise of eminent domain. In the event of an exercise of eminint domain by King iounty, the value to be attributed to all the rights and interests granted under this franchise itratt i'ot e*ceed *re actual amount ttre Grantee paid to King County in obaining ttris franchise. 7. ENFORCEMENT Failure of King County,- on one or more occasions to exercise a right or to require compliance or Pgrformance under this franchise or any applicable law, shall not b; deemed to'constitute a waiverof such.right.or a yri.yer of compliance or performan@, unless such right has been specifically Yliu$ in- writing. {*ity.t of King County to enforce or exercise is righ6 under *y prwision of t{tig fr.anchise or applicable law does not constiture-,zr waiver of its rigfr's to enforce-oi exercise aright in any other provision of ttris franchise or applicable law. 8. ,, The.Grantee agrees.!o. indemryfy and hold harmless King County as provided herein to the maximum extent-possible under law. Accordingly, ttre Grantee ugr.ri for iiself, its succqssors, and assigns to defend, indemnify.and.ttq!{ hqmles,g King Counry, i6 appointed and elected officials, and eqployees from a$-a4i1st liability for all claims, demands, siric, and judgments, inctuOing costs of defense theraf, Qr injury to persons, _d?th, or property damage whicir is-caused by, ariseiort of, or is incidental to Grantee's eiercise of rights ani piivitlges grinteA by ttris franchii|. The Grantee's obligations under this section shall include: (a) Indemnification for such claims whether or not ttrey arise from the sole negligence of the Grantee, the concurrent negligence of both farties, or the negligend oT one or more third parties. O) The duty to.promptly accept tender of defense and provide defense to the County at the Grantee's own experu;e. (c) Indemnification of claims made by the Grantee's own employees or agenrs. 7 I.80gs (d) Waiver of the Grantee's immunity under the industrial insurance provisions of Title 51 RCW, which waiver has been mutually negotiated by the parties. In the event it is necessary for the Counry to incur attorney's fees, Iegal expefttes, or other costs to enforce the provisions of this section, all such fees, expenses and costs shall be recoverable from the Grantee. In ttre event it is determined that RCW 4.24.115 applies to this franchise agreement, the Grantee agrees to defend, hold harnrless and indemnify King County to the maximum extent permitted thereunder, and specifically for its negligence concurrent with ttrat of King County to the full extent of Grantee's negligence. Grantee agrees to defend, indemnify and hold harmless ttre County for claims by Grantee's employees and agrees to waiver of its immunity under Title 51 RCW, which waiver has been mutually negotiated by ttre parties. King County shall give ttre Grantee timely written notice of ttre making of any claim or of the commencement of any such action, suit, or other proceeding covered by the indemnity in tttis section. In ttre event any such claim arises, the County or any other indemnified parry shall tender the defense thereof to the Grantee and the Grantee shall have the duty to defend, settle, or compromise any claims arising hereunder and the County shall cooperate fully therein. Nonvithstanding the above, ttre County shall have no obligation to tender a defense as a condition of the indemnity where there is a material conflict between ttre interests of the Grantee and King County. 9. VACATION If at any time King County vacates any County road rights-of-way covered by this franchise, King County will not be held liable for any damages or loss to the Grantee by reason of such vacation. King Counry may, after giving thirry (30) days written notice to the Grantee, terminate this franchise with respect to any County road righs-of-way vacated. 10. REPAIR. REMOVAL OR RELOCATION The Grantee hereby covenants, at its own expense, to repair, remove, or relocate existing facilities including all appurtenant facilities and service lines connecting its system to users, within King County road rights-of-way if such repair, removal, or relocation is required by King County for any County road purpose. Such repair, removal, or relocation shall not be unreasonably required. The grantee shall, at no experuie to the County, adjust, remove or relocate existing facilities wittrin County road rights-of-way, including all appurtenant facilities and service lines connecting is system to users, if the County determines such adjustment, removal or relocation is reasonably necessary to allow for an improvement or alteration plarured by the County in such road right-of- way. The County shall give ttre Grantee written notice of such requirement as soon as practicable, at the beginning of the predesign stage for projects that are part of ttre County's capital improvement prograrn, including such available information as is reasonably necessary for the Grantee to plan for such adjustment, removal or relocation. For projects that are a part of *re County's capital improvement program, in addition to any other I 113$8;J notice given to the Grantee, the County shall provide a vertical and horizonal profile of tfue roadway and drainage flciljties wittrin it, both existing and as proposed by ttre County, and t1e" gropgsed construction schedule; nonvithsan{ing qV peryni! conditions ttrat may later be-applied tothe County p-igtt,. lh! ini-tid- design information shall be given at bait t80 dayi'before construction is scheduld !q begi$ except in cases of urgent construction or emergeniies. The Grantee shall respond to thiS notice, unq^q a1y llter notices of revised designs Uaiea on permit conditions, within no -more ttran thrty (30) days by providing ro the Counft flre best aniitultt information as to the location of all of the Grantee's facilities, including all ippurtenant facilities and service lines connecting its system to useni and all facilities that it fr'as aUiriaoned, wittrin the area proposed for the public works project. The County- shall offer the Grantee the opportunity to participate in the preparation of bid documents for *re selection of a conractor-to perfoim th6 public works ptoieci as well as all required adjusnnents, removals or relocations of the Grantee's facilities. Suctr Uia documents shall proYide for.an appropriate cost allocation-betrveen E puttio. The County shall have sole autlority to choose the contactor to perform such work. ttre Grantee and ttre -County may negoti"tr uit agreement for the Grantee to pay ttre County for ir allocation of costs, but neittrer-p*t shall be bound to enter into such an agreement. Under such an agreement, in addition to ttre brantee's allocation of contactol costs, the Grantee shall reimbune the County for cost, such as for {tspqttgry or soils testing,.related to ttre Grantee's work and reasonably iircuned Ui'tft Co*ry i; ttre administration of such joint construction conffacts. Such costs shali be calculated as t6e Aiiect salary cost of the time ofCounty professiopal -and technical personnel spent productively engaged in :u.-tt yotn., plus overhead costs at the standard ryte charged by the Couirty on other similar;t;Fo, including joint projects wittr other County agencies 11. The Grantee, its successors or assigns, ha.s ttre right, privilege, and authority to ent€r the County ryad risfts-of-way f9r $e purpose of operating, mainaining, repairing or construction itstrarnmission and t"rytf lines and appurtenancas on the conditioi'ttrat^it obflins permits rpp;;".d !v tttl Director and $operry lq*iio Division and, when applicable, Uy tfri orpanit'.nt oiDevelopment pd Environmental Services. .Applications for work^permits shatl be presinted to the Soqgtty Services Division_which may require copies of plans, bludprints, "tos-r."iions, or furtherdetailing of work to be done. In the event oi an emergency,'the Grant " *uy fi;.diilt cornmen@ the necessary lrork and shall apply the nelt businesi day for ttre work permit. Ani,work-done, whether by Grantee, is contattors, or third parties will includ. nr."sury paving,p."phhg^' grading- and -any gther reaso*Fly npsqry rep;ir or restorarionlto *re coiniy roicirights-of-way. All work shall be done to the satisfactioir of the Director. All equipment, lines and appurtenances which are used in the operation, maintenance, repair orconstruction of the Grantee's service and which are located wittriir the County road rigirts;i*.y shall be considered to be part of ttrg Grantee's syst€m and shatl be the ropo*iUif ity of fi. Ci*t*". -All permits for the operation, maintenance, rgpair-or-construction of *ia tyrt"r shall be rppiUfor a1d given in the name of the Grantee, whb will be responsible foi ati'wort done under thepermit. The Grantee remains responsible whettrer the work is don" by tftaCrantee, ic cnntractois, or by third parties. The-Grantee shall, at no expense to the County, assu-me the following obligations wittr respect to ttre facilities connected o is system that are wittrin County road righftof-iay-anA which it does 9 gs#Eeg ,.] not own, including appurtenant facilities and service lines connecting its system to users: (a) The Grantee shall apply for, upon request and on behalf of the owner of the facilities, a County right-of-way construction permit for any repairs required for such facilities; provided such owner agrees to reimburse the Grantee for all costs incurred by the Grantee and any other reasonable conditions the Grantee requires as a precondition to applying for the permit. All work to be performed in the County right-of-way shall comply with all conditions of the County permit and all applicable County requirements. The Grantee may at its option perform any part of the repair with its own forces or require the owner o employ a contractor for that purpose, provided such contactor is approved by the County; (b) In the event that the County determines emergency repair of such facilities is necessary to hdt or prevent significant damage to County road rights-of-way or significant threats to tlrc health, safety and welfare of parties other than the owner or the occupants of the building served by such facilities, the Grantee shall uke prompt remedial action to correct ttre emergency to the County's approval, which the County shall not unreasonably withhold; (c) When the County or iB contractor provides notice to the Grantee, pursuant to RCW 19.122, of its intent to excavate within County road rightsof-way, the Grantee shall provide to ttre County or its contactor ttre best information available from the Grantee's records or, where reasonable, from the use of locating equipment as to the location of such facilities, including surface markings where these would reasonably be of use in the excavation. If the Grantee fails to make good faith efforts to provide the above information within ttre deadlines provided by RCW 19.122, the Grantee shall hold ttre County harmless for all reasonable costs that result from damage to such facilities if such damage @curs as a result of the failure to provide such information. Nottring in this subsection is intended or shall be construed to create any rights in any third party or to form the basis for any obligation or liability on the part of ttre County or ttre Grantee toward any ttrird party, nor is anyfiing in ttris subsection intended to be construed to alter ttre rights and responsibilities of the parties under RCW 19.122, as amended. 12. RESTORATION OF COUNTY ROAD RIGHTS-OF-WAY After work on, under or adjacent to County road rights-of-way, the Grantee is resporsible for and will leave all County road rights-of-way in as good a condition as they were in befor.e any work was done. In the event that the Grantee, its confractors, or third parties working under permit should fail to restore County road rights-of-way to the satisfaction of the Director, King County may make such repairs or restorations as are necessary to return ttre County road rights-of-way to its pre-work condition. Upon presentation of an itemized bill for repairs or restorations, including ttre costs of labor and equipment, the Grantee will pay the bill within ttrirty (30) days. If suit is brought upon the Grantee's failure to pay for repair and restoration, and if judgment in such a suit is entered in favor of King County, then the Grantee shall pay all of the actual @sts, including interest from the date ttre bill was presented, disbursements, and attorney's fees and litigation related costs incurred. 10 18CI8Sffi 13. PERFORMANCE OF WORK The Grantee covenants that in consideration for the rights and privileges granted by ttris franchise, all work performed- by _tre Grantee on County road rights-of-way itratt conform to all County lequirements includ^ing, bq not limited to, the requirements of the current edition of ttre County Road Sandards in force when the work is performed and all traffic contol shall also conform tir the current edition of the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices in force when the work is performed. 14. BLASTING REOUIREMENTS The right to operate, maintain, repair and corntruct Grantee's disribution and service lines and -apputpna{ces granted by this franchise does not preclude King County, its agents or contactors from blasting, grading, or doing other road work to the Grantee s lines inU app-urtenances. Except in the case of an emergency, ttre Grantee yil! be given ten (10) business Oayi written notice of ariy b]asting so ttrat the Grantee may prot€ct its lines and appurtenances. If dre Grantee notifies the loun_ff within ten (10) business days rhat the facilities will have to be relocated to protect tlrem from blastiTg, qe County will defer ttre blasting for up to ninety (90) days from ttr6 date of ttreot-tgi*l notice. In no event will ttre Grantee be given less ttran trvb (Z)-Uusiness days written notice of q{ bfsti$j__Nglification 9f any excavation shall be provided through ttre Oni-Call Sysrem as provided by RCW L9.122, as hereinafter amended. 15. SURVEY MARKERS AND MONUMENTS It shall be the responsibility of ttre Grantee performing iury construction work in ttre Counry road righs-of-way- !o_r$!gr9 any lurvey markeis or monuments disturbed by such construction in accordance with RCW 58.09.130, and as hereinafter amended. 16. ASSIGNMENT The Grantee shall not hlve tlre right-to assign this franchise without the consent of the Meropolitan King Countr Coqnqll gl_ven by Gdinance. No assignment shall be effective unless * u...bt"n * !v the.assi8nee of all righc, conditions, terms, provisions, and resporsibilities contained within the franchise, as well t lurety bonds which the Cbuncil deems neces:sary to be posted are received. Council.approval-oj t{e aslienment may be made subject to the assignee's "..epancr of new or modified terms of the franchise. 17. EXPIMTION AND RENEWAL To the extent described in Exhibit "A', all-rights granted by this franchise to County road righc-of-way outside.incorporated Towns and Cities appll to .l! existing County roai righcif-Wuy tmproved and unimproved and to all County rmd righs-of-way acquired by King County durin! the term of ttris franitrise. r L - -J -- If ttre Grantee has initiated a renewal of this franchise before it expires, ttre County may, at its sole discretion, extend the term of the franchise on a month to month'basis'for up to onr year. Should $e C-$nty elect to extend ttre franchise, written notice shall be provided to tt" Graniee before the franchise expiration date. 11 1S08&a If ttre Grantee has not applied for a renewal of this franchise b"fol" it expirep, King Cgynty has ttre right to remove or relocite any lines and appurtenaryes o{ the Grantee as is reasonably necessary fo-r the public's health, welfare, safety, oi convenience including, but not limited to, the safe operation of County rbads, franchise-holders, or fo1 ttre construction, renewu-rg,-.{brqg,-or iriproving of any C6umy road rightof-way, or for ttre installation of lines and/or facilities of ottrer frairchiseloheri. Gran-tee shall be liable for ttre cosb incurred in any removal or relocation of its lines and appurtenances under ttris section. Costs include the expense of labor and eqlipment. Upon expiration of this franchise, ttre Grantee shall continue to be responsible for ttre.operation and *iintenunce of existing facilities in the County road rights-of-way until removed, assigned.to another franchised utility or abandoned; however, the Grantee shall not have the righl to Rlwide additional services or construct new facilities. King County will issue permits required for the repair and maintenan@ of the existing facilities in accordance with K.C.C. L4.44.055 as amended and Section 11 of ttris franchise. This sectionand sections 8, 10-13 and 15 of this franchise shall continue in force until such time as the lines are removed from County road rights-of-way, assigned to another franchised utility, or abandoned in place with ttre approval of ttre Manager of the Department of Transportation, Road Services Division. 18. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS King County specifrcally reserves for iself the right to impose a utility taa on the Grantee if such ta*frg authority is granied by State of Washington and the local option is exercised by the King County Council. King County also specifically reserves the right to exercise authority it has or may acquire in the future to secure and receive fair market compensation for the use of its properfy, pursuant to an ordinance. If King County elects to exercise such authority, the fair markqt compensation requirement for Grantee shall be imposed by ordinarrce not less than one hundred eighry (180) days affer written notice ("Compensation Notice") is delivered to the Grantee, said Compensation \oLiT identiffing with specificity ttre defrnition, terms and/or formula to be used in determiniry tq$ f.g markei compensaiion. A-cceptance of King County's definition terms and/or formula identified in ttre Compensation Notice will occur if the Grantee accepts in writing within thtrty.(30)--4ry of receipt oi ttre Compensation Notice; or, if Grantee takes no action in writing within-thirty (301 days of receipt of the Compensation Notice; in which case the applicable ordinance ttrat ttre King County Council passes will be determinative. Nothing in ttris section shall be construed as an agreement by ttre Granter of King County's right to exercis6 auttrority it has or may acquire in ttre future to secure and receive fair market compensation for the use of pioperry. Nothing-in this section shall be construed to prohibil the Grantee from challenging, in-King eounty Superior Court or a court of competent jurisdiction, the legality of such right. Grantee's rejection of the definition, terms, and/or formula identified in the Compensatlon- Noticg will onty ociur if such rejection is in written form, identiffing wittr specificity the gounds for such rejection, and delivered io fing County within ttrirty €0) days after rerceipt of ttre Compensation Notice, in which case the below identified arbiration terms will apply: (a) The Grantee and King County will select one arbifator each, and ttre two selected t2 I308e arbitrators will select a thkd arbitator. If the nvo arbitators have not selected a ttrird arbitrator within thirry (30) days after the selection of the last selection of the two, either the Grantee or King County may apply to the presiding judge of the King County Superior Court for the appointment of a third-arbirator. The tluee arbitators will determine the mettrod for determining the fair market compensation f9t.F9 County property used by the Grantee. The arbimation procedure dmployed shall be consistent wittr ttre rules and procedures of ttre Aherican Arbinaiibn Association. The decision of a majority of the arbinators will bind both the Grantee and King County. At ttre conclusion of ttre arbitration, the arbinators will submit*tjtt"n repoq !o ilt9 Grantee and King County which shall contain all pertinent evidence ttrat led to their conclusion together with an explanation of ilreir rbasoning for such conclusion. (b) The fees of the arbitrators selected by each party shall be paid by ttrat party, and the fees of the third arbinator shall be paid one-half by ttre -Counry and'ttre Grantee. The other costs of the proceeding shall be shared equally by ihe County and the Grantee. . (c) In event that ttre queslion of fair market compen$ation is not resolved prior to the effective dap -specifie{ !y *te ordinance rythorizing said compe'nsation, ttre arbination decision will be applied retroactively to the effectiv6 date in ttre ordinance. The Granter will pay the refioactive sum plus interest in the amount of twelve percent (12%) per annum. .t'loting^tn ttris franchis" -*uy be construed to limit the exercise of authority now or later possessed by.ttrc County or any otlrcr governing body haying competent jurisdiction to fx lust, riasonaUti and.compensatory rates or other.requiremens for iervic6s und6r this franchise. N"ttti"g i" *tit section shall be construed to prohibit the Grantee from challenging, in King County Superi6r Court or a court.of competent jurisdiction the auttrority of the County ol any oth'er goveining body to fx rates or other requiremenB for services. 19. COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS Grantee shall confoyn to3l applicable_ federal, state and local_laws and regulations including, butnot-limited to, the State Envirbnmental Policy Act and King County envir6nmenal sandards and ordinances. 20. NON-DISCRIMINATION CLAUSE In all.hiring oremployment made possible or resulting from this fianchise agrerment, there shall beno discrimination agains-t any employee or applicant for employment Se.uuse of r.*, sexual orientation, 1ge,- rag, color, creed, nationat origin, maria! stahrs or ttre prorn." of *y ;d;t menlal, or physical \*digp, unless_based upon a bona fide occupationil qualification, ana ttit requirement shall tp-pty to but lot be limit€d t6 ttre following: employment, ddvertising, i"y-off oi termination, rates of pay or other forms of compensation, and selection for faining, iictuding ap-prenticeship. No.person shall be dq1d, or subjected. to discrimination in receipt of ttre benefit of any services oractivities made possible by or iesulting from this agreement on tle grounds of'sex, giuA 13 1S08e ':. / orientation, raea, color, creed, national origin, age except minimum age and retirement provisions, marital status, or the presence of any sensory, mental or physical handicap. Any violation of this provision shall be considered a violation of a material provision of this agreement and shall be grounds for cancellation, termination or suspersion in whole or in part, of the agreement by tlre County and may result in ineligibility for furttrer County agreements. The Grantee shall make the best efforts to make oppornrnities for employment and/or confiacting services available to women and minority persons. The Grantee recognizes that King County has a policy of promoting affirmative action, equal oppornrnity and has resources available to assist Grantee in these efforts. 21. PENALTY FOR VIOLATION OF CONDITIONS If the Grantee shall violate or fail to comply with any of the material terms, conditions, or responsibilities of this franchise through neglert or failure to obey or comply with any notice given the Grantee under the provisions of this franchise or if the Grantee abandoru its franchise, the Council may revoke this franchise. King County shall give written notice of is intent to revoke ttris franchise. A public hearing shall be scheduled within forty-five (45) days following the notification. The decision to revoke ttris franchise will become effective ninety (90) days following the public hearing if the County, by ordinance, finds: A. That the Grantee has not subsAntially cured the violation or fuilure O comply which was the basis of the notice; or that the violation or failure to comply which was the basis of the notice is incapable ofcure; or B. C.that the Grantee has repeatedly violated or failed to comply with any terms, conditions, or responsibilities of ttre franchise, even though violations have been cured; and that the revocation of the franchise is in the public interest. of the material tlrc individual D During the forty-five (a5) days following the notification, the Grantee shall have the opportunity to remedy the failure to comply. 22. RIGHT OF APPEAL Decisions, requirements, or Appeals from the Director County Superior Court. Director are binding on the parties to this document. will be made by filing a complaint with the King approvals of the 's determinations 23. SEVERANCE This franchise gives effect to purposes and uses which are consistent wittr economical and efficient services rendered in the public interest. If any provision of this franchise, or ig application is determined to be invalid by a court of law, then ttre remaining provisions of ttris franchise shall continue and remain valid unless the dominant purpose of the franchise would be prevented or tlrc L4 l$OBS *public interest is no longer served. Revised V||XD6 15 bipdl#rlfrnFIs 196 ST'Soahg\J\sscSE'{Ia-\o2rlf--ISE 286 STt.CITY OF KENTWATER SERVICE AREANORTHKENT WATER SERVICEAREA BOUNDARYKENT CtTY LIMITSCITY OF KENTWATER TRANCHISEPrinted 09-11-97@VICII{ITYMAP ,-l INTERLOGAL AGREEMENT WITH KING COUNTY WATER DISTRIGT #111, ctTY oF KENT, AND ctTY OF AUBURN (Water Service Area) September 5, 2006 ) ) CITY OF KENT, KING COUNTY WATER DISTRICT NO. 11I ANd CITY OF AUBURN INTERLOCAL AGREEM ENT ESTABLISHING WATER SERVICE BOUNDARIES S AGREEMENT ('Agreement"), made and entered rnto th¡s *day of2006, by and between the Ci ty of Kent, a Washlngton mu niclpalcoratlon ( "Kent"), King Cou nty W ater Distri ct No. 111, a Washrngton mu nrctpalcorporatlon ( "WD #111"),and the CITY OF AUBURN, a Washrngton m unrcrpalcorporatton, ( "Auburn"),all belng duly organ rzed and existrng under and by vrrtue ofthe laws of the State of Washington (rnd rvrdually a "Party" and collectlvely the"Partles). WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, pursuant to RCW 35.4.1 1.O4O,Aubum has the legal authority toexerclse lts powers and perform any of rts functrons as set forth rn RCW 3g.34, and WHEREAS, pursuant to Chapter 39 34 RCW, the lnterlocal Cooperation Act,Auburn has the legal authorrty to cooperate wlth other localttres and utll[les on thebasls of mutual advantage and the effrcient prou,rion of munrcipal serurces, and WHEREAS, pur'suant to Chapter 39 34 RcW, the lnterlocal Cooperatron Act,Kent has the legal authorrty to cooperate wth otner¡ocalities and utrlrtres on the bas¡sof mutual advantage and the effrcrent provrsron of munrcrpar servrces, and WHEREAS, pursuant to Chapter 39 34 RCW, the tnterlocal Cooperation Act,WD #11 t has the. legal authorrty to òooperat.l*'tÁ'oir,"l. locahtles and utihtres on thebasls of mutual advantage and ihe eff¡crbnt ptou'rion ãf rrn,",pal servrces, and WHEREAS, the parltes recognze the responsrbility of pubhc water utrlrties toprovlde effic¡ent and rehable serv¡ce to therr customers at reasonable cost; and WHEREAS, Kent owns, and deslres to be the water seryrce provrder for aproperty currently wlthln the corporate lrmlts of Kent, and wrthrn the servrce areas ofAubum and WD #111, and WHEREAS, pursuant to Chapter 70.1Coordinatlon Act, the parties determineO anO ãgbetween the parties as set forth ln tne South XrÀ[ Auburn Resolut¡on No 3920 Kent, WD #11 1 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreement Establshrng Waler Servlce Boundarres Page I ofg 16 RCW, Public Water System reed upon the water seruÍce areas County Coordlnated Water System { Plan ("Plan") and the Parties now desire to modrfy thelr water service area boundaries as agreed in this Agreement. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideratron of the terms and condrtrons set forth herein, the Partres agree as follows: 1. Water Service Area. WD #111 and Auburn agree to relinquish to Kent the water service area depicted on the map attached hereto as Attachment 1 and legally descnbed rn Attachmenl 2, whrch are by thls reference rncorporated herein. The Partres agree that the South Krng County Coordinated Water System Plan and the water seryice area boundanes as set forth rn the Plan shall be modúred to be rn accordance wrth the Part¡es'water sery¡ce area boundanes as set forth ln Attachment 1 2. Management, Regulation and Control of Water System. Kent, WD #111 and Auburn shall have the sole responsrbrlrty and authority to construct, maintarn, manage, conduct and operate their water systems wrthrn their desrgnated water seryrce areas as deprcted rn Attachment 1, togetherwlth any addrtrons, extenstons and betterments thereto. 3. Future Annexations. The Partres agree that Kent shall provide water servlce to the area deptcted in Attachment 1 wrthout regard to the present corporate boundar¡es of the Parttes and wtthout regard to future corporate boundanes as they may be perrodrcally altered through annexatlon 4. Kent Comprehensive Water Planning. The terms of thrs Agreement w¡ll be included as an amendment to Kent's Comprehenslve Water System Plan Kent wlll submrt to Auburn and WD #111 ils Comprehensrve Water System Plans and amendments thereto. 5. WD #111 Comprehensive Water Planning. The terms of this Agreement will be included as an amendment to WD #111's Comprehenstve Water Plan WD #111 w¡ll submlt to Kent and Aubum fts Comprehensrve Water System Plans and amendments thereto. 6. Auburn Gomprehensive Water Planning. The terms of this Agreement will be included as an arnendment to Aubum's Comprehensrve Water Plan. Auburn wrll submtt to Kent and WD #111 its Comprehensrve Water System Plans and amendments thereto. 7. Reliance. Each Party hereto acknowledges that the terms hereof will be relied upon by the other tn tts comprehensive planning to meet the needs of the serytce area designated herein. Aubum Resduton No 3920 Kent, WD #111 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreemenl Estabhshrng Water Servlce Boundanes Page 2 of 9 8. Liability. Except as set foilh in Section 12 regarding default, failure to perform or negltgent conduct, the Partles agree that this Agreement shall not be a source ofliabtlity between the Parties for any failure or interruption of service in the servtce area of any Party as designated in thts Agreement. 9- Government Notlflcations. Auburn wtll give notice of the adoption of thisAgreement to Metropolrtan/King County, to the Washington State Department ofHealth, to the South King County Regronal Water Association, to the Water Utility Coordinatíng Commútee, and to any other agency with junsdrctton over, or interest inthe terms hereol and the Partrei shall ðoopárate and assrst each other rn allreasonable manner ln procunng any necessary approvals hereof by those agencles. 10. Boundary Review Board. ln the event that implementatlon of the terms herelnresult in permanent water serytce to areas that wrll be outsrde the respectve serylceboundarles of Kent, WD #111 or Auburn, the Parties wlll, at the tlme of such servlce, lointly flle a notlce of lntentton wrth the Krng County Boundary Revlew Board inaccordance wrth chapter 36 93.090 RCW and -chapter 57 08 047 RCW 11. Alteration, Amendment or Modification. Kent, WD #111 and Aubum herebyreserve the nght to alter, amend or modrfy the tenns and condlttons of thlóAgreement only upon wrtten agreement of the Þartles to such alteratlon, amendmentor modflcaton. 12' lndemnification and Hold Harmless. Each Party hereto agrees to protect,defend, and lndemnfy the other Partres, therr offlcers, offictals, employ"", "ndagents from any and all cost, claims, .¡udgments and/or awards of damages, arisrngout of or in any way resulting from ine rndemnifyrng Party's, rts ómptoyees]subcontractors or agents default, fa¡lure of performance, oi neghgent conductassociated wrth thls agreement. Each Party agrees that its oblgatìois under thrsprovlslon extend to any claim, demand, andior cause of actlon -brought by or onbehatf of any of lts employees, or agents The foregorng rndemnfiy rs spec6rcally andexpressly lntended to constltute a warver of eaın Party'ı rmmunrty underWashlngton's lndustrtal lnsurance Act, RCW Tltle 51, as respects the other parties only, and only to the extent necessary to provrde each Party ù'tn a full and completetndemntty of clalms made by the other Party's employees. The paftres acknowlädgethat these provrsrons were speqfrcally negoirated ånd "gr"ed upon by them. 13' lntegration- This Agreement constrtutes the entíre agreement of the parties regarding the sub¡ect mafter hereof, and there are no other- representatlons or oralagreernents other than those listed herein, which vary the terms of thls Agreement.Future agreements may occur between the Parties to transfer additional or futureservice areas by mutual agreement. Aubum Resolutron No 3920 Kent, WD #1 1 I and Aubum lnterlocal Agreement Estabhshrng Water Servr ce Boundanes Page 3 of g 14. Obligation lntact. Nothing herein shall be construed to alter the rights, responslbllftles, habllftles, or obligatrons of Kent, WD #111 or Aubum regardtng provision of water service, except as speoflcally set forth herein. 15. Duration. Thrs Agreement shall take effect on the last day approved by all of the Parties and shall remarn rn effect until modlfred by written agreement of the Partres 16. Recording. Pursuant to RCW 39.34 040, following the approval and execution of this Agreement by the Parties, this Agreement shall be flled wlth the King County Audfior. Aubum Resoluton No 3920 Kent, WD #1 11 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreement Estabhshrng Water Servlce Boundar¡es Page 4 of I CIry OF KENT Approved by Motion No.of the City of Kent, Kent, Washington, at its regular meetlng held on the 2006. /þ day of Mayor Approved as to form: , Ctty Attorney Cily of KING COUNTY WATER DISTRICT NO. 1I1 Approved by Resolutlon No. of the King County Water Distnct No. 111, ) fent, Washrngton, at rts regular meetrng held on the ßtt day of .lu 'tl- 2006 By: P anls,President Krng County Water Dlstnct No 111 Approved as to form: ûL( /t-General Counsel King Water District No. 111 Aubum Resolufon No 3920 Kent, WD #111 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreement Establshrng Waler Sevce Boundarres Page 5 of I CITY OF ^AUBURN Approved by Resolution No. regular meeting held on ffie P 6u, l+.of J-b/"ÁLrv,.2006. By: Peter B. Lewis, Mayor Ctty of Aubum Da skam, C[y Clerk rel B Her Aubum Reöoluton No 3920 Kent, WD #1 11 and Aubum Interlocal Agreement Establshrng Water Servlce Boundanes Page 6 of I ) U) ST a84th ?86rh Æ.l) @ È{ ST fEì crw SERVI, )FK 3EA =NT.oREÆ WATER DISTRICT SERVICE AREA Êr trla) F{ E þ{ c\)c) SE 288th ST .t) @ Fl F{ É1 U) SE '"t o[ ej-d {o $ñ 304th ST JfL þ() r Es¡ 306TH ST ST d SE SE JOEIH SE PL CITY OF AUB PT SERVI RN SE SE f'l V) SE Pt. CUY Or KENT KING COUNTY I'IATER DISTRICT NO 11I AND CITY OF AUBURN INTERTOCAI AGREEMENT ESTABLISHINC $ATER SERVICE BOUNDÀRIAS ATTACHMENT 1 Attachment 2 Legal Description THAT PORT¡ON OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 2'I NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, W M IN KING COUNTY WASHINGTON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 3 IN SAID SECTION 4. THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 30 FEET TO THE WEST MARGIN OF 124TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH ALONG SAID WEST MARGIN TO THE NORTHERLY MARGIN OF SOUTHEAST 3O4TH STREET; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHERLY MARGIN OF SE 3O4TH STREET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE PLAT OF CRYSTAL MEADOWS AS RECORDED IN VOLUME I94 OF PLATS AT PAGES 66 AND 67, RECORDS OF KING COUNTY, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY EDGÉ OF SAID PLAT TO THE MOST NORTHERLY CORNER OF LOT IO OF SAID PLAT, THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE NORTH EDGE OF SAID PLAT TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 15 OF SAID PLAT, THENCE SOUTHERLYALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 15 TO A POINT 50 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF TRACT 11 OF THE PLAT OF THE SOUND TRUSTEE COMPANY'S THIRD ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 13 OF PLATS AT PAGE 1OO, RECORDS OF KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID TRACT 11, SAID POINT LYING 135 FEET WEST OF THE EAST LINE OF SAID TRACT 11, Aubum Resolutþn No 3920 Kent, WD #1 11 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreement Estabhshrng Water Servrce Boundanes Page B of 9 THENCE CONTINUING NORTHWESTERLY TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINEOF SAID TRACT 11, SAID POINT LYING 313.36 FEET WEST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT 1 1, THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE LINE COMMON TO TRACTS 10 AND 11 OFSAID PLAT OF THE SOUND TRUSTEE COMPANY'S THIRD ADDITION TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTH 120 FEET OF SAID TRACT 10, THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE EAST HALF OF THESOUTH 120 FEET OF SAID TRACT 10 TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THEEAST HALF OF THE SOUTH 120 FEET OF SAID TRACT 10, THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH 120 FEET OF SAIDTRACT 10 TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID TRACT 10, THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID WEST LINE OF SAID TRACT 10 AND THE WESTLINE OF TRACT 9 OF SAID PLAT OF THE SOUND TRUSTEE COMPANY'S THIRDADDITION TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT 9, THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT 9 TO THENORÏHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT 9 AND THE WEST LINE OF THESOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 4;- THENCE NORTH ALONG LAST SAID WEST LINE AND THE WEST LINE OFGOVERNMENT LOT 3 OF SAID SECTION 4 TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OFsAtD GOVERNMENT LOr g; ,i THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 3 TOTHE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING Aubum Resoluton No 3920 Kent, WD #111 and Auburn lnterlocal Agreernent Estabhshr ng Water Servrce Boundanes Page 9 of 9 *** Peler B. Lewls, Moyor WASHINGTON September 18, 2006 25 Wesl Morn Street + Aubum WA 98001-4998 * www oubumwo gov * 253-931'3000 Brenda Jacober, Cúy Clerk Crty of Kent 220 4th Avenue South Kent WA 98032 RE INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT ESTABLISHING WATER SERVICE BOUNDARIES Dear Brenda' Enclosed are two fully executed origrnals of the Cûy of Kent, Krng County Water Dtstnct No 1 1 I and Cúy of Auburn lnterlocal Agreement establrshrng Water Servlce Boundaries. The Crty of Auburn Crty Councrl approved the lnterlocal Agreement on September 5, 2006 pursuant to Resolutron No 3920 lf you have any questtons regardrng the agreement, please contact Water Utility Engineer Jeff Roscoe at (253) 931-4008 Srncerely, Danrelle Daskam Crty Clerk Enc AUnUnN x røonn rHAN You TMAGTNED ,-l '-, ) EMERGENGY WATER SYSTEM INTERTIE AGREEMENT Kent/Auburn Intertie Agreement No. I ETüERGENGY WATER SYSTEM INTERTIE AGREEMENT KenUAuburn lntertie Agreement No. I THls AGREEMENT made and entered rnto by and between the Cily of Auburn,herelnafter referred to as Auburn, and, the Crty oí Kent, herernafter referred to as Kent,for the purposes of plannlng, desgntng, constructrng, marnta¡nlng, and operatrng anemergency system ¡ntertre between the respectrve partres, -. WITNESSETH: WHEREAs, both citres have water facrhtles ¡n the vrcrnity, and WHEREAS, both C¡t¡es can tncrease fire protectron and emergency water supplyrehabilfty for the¡r customers, and WHEREAS, the Cttles are wtlltng to provide the necessary servrces to rncreaseftre fighhng and emergency supply retlabrtriy upon the terms and conditlons set forthhere¡n, Now, THEREFORE, lr rs lvruruALly AGREED as foilows. 1 The emergency water system ¡ntertre rs ¡ntended to be operated manuallyas a two way emergencly supply between the Auburn and Kent SystemsThe rntertre facilrty shall be located near South Z77b Street at thé WaterServtce Area Boundanes between the two cltles. An exrsting rntertlelocated at B Street NE and South 277'h Street w¡ll be replaceä wrth atemporary metertng stat¡on and eventually a permanent meterrng staton F¡nal locatron and confrguratron of the facilÍtres shall be determrnéd at the tlme of final deslgn 2 The emergency water system rntertle shall be operated only in the event of an emergency For purposes of thrs agreement, an emergency shall bedeflned.as resultlng from a water shortage, a ma¡or water llne break, flredemand, contamlnatlon to the watei supply system, mechanlcal gquipment fallure, electrlcal equrpment fallure-or Rúget Sound Energyfactltty fa¡lure, or any other agreed upon emergency wrthtn the water supply system 3 Auburn has acqurred the nght of way for the meterrng statron and Kent wrll desrgn and admlnster the contract for the construction of the temporaryfacllftles wtthln the nght of way acqurred by the Crty of Auburn Th;permanent facllúles wlll be constructed as parl of the South 27Th Streetlmprovement Prolect All of the facrlities w¡li be designed and constructedin accordance wlth reasonably accepted yater uttlily-standards for slmílar muntclpal water util¡t¡es Auburn wrll own and malniain the prping, tntelor Page 1 of4 4 equipment, emergency meter and rntenor appurtenances, and all ptpng up to the Kent sde of the vault for both the temporary and permanent metenng stations Upon completron of constructton, Auburn wlll transfer ownershrp of all exterror appurtenances, and all piprng whrch rs located on the Kent srde of the vault, to Kent Kent wrll own and marnta¡n the extenor appurtenances and all ptptng on Kent's slde of the vault Each Ctty wrll each have unlimrted access to the vault via a dual padlock or ownershlp of keys to the vault Each Ctty wtll operate the respecltve normally locked valve rnsrde of the vault Auburn wlll solely unlock and operate the locked valve on Auburn's sde of the meter and Kent wlll solely unlock and operate the locked valve on Kent's slde of the meter The procedure for operatrng the rntertle ln the event of such emergency shall be as follows A Each Ctty shall determrne that an emergency of sufficlent magnitude has occurred which warrants the need to request that the interhe be actrvated The Publrc Works Dtrector or appointed person or authorrzed personnel shall provrde a verbal request to the other City's Pubhc Works Drrector or appointed person. Upon agreernent that an emergency exists whrch shall allow for the lntertle to be opened, the rntert¡e wrll be activated as soon as. reasonably possrble Both Cúres' personnel shall be present at the vault to open the valves to actrvate the faølfiy c The Ctty requestrng the actlvat¡on shall provide a wr¡tten confrrmatron of the request not less than 24 hours after the verbal request, or on the first day of normal business after the verbal request. The rntertrc shall remarn actrvated untrl the Cúy requestrng actlvatlon deterrnrnes that the need for actrvation of the emergency rntertre has ceased and shall request ¡n writrng to close the intertre ln case of emergency or whenever the publrc health, safety, or the equrtable distnbut¡on of water so demands, the C[y supplyng the water may change, reduce or llmit the tlrne for or temporanly drscontlnue the supply of water w¡thout nottce, water servrce may be temporanly tnterrupted, limited for purposes of making reparrs, 5 6 7 B D E. Page2ot 4 I extensrons or _dorng other necessary work; and the cÍy supplyingthe water shall not be responsrble ior any damage resultrng iromrnterruptron, change or fa¡lure of the wa[er supðly, and thä cityrecelvlng the water (Crty requesttng actrvatron) shaú'save and holdharmless the city supplying the wáter trom any loss, damages orsudes to or by customers of_ the Crty receivrng the water reıultrng from rnterruptron, change or fa¡lure oÍ water suþply provded by thñAgreement,.except damages ansrng out of th'e' óry supplyrni thewaler's neghgence pnor to a plañned intenuptron oi irmrtrñg ot servrce, the cfty supplyrng the water wrll notify the crty recervrnglthewater of such not less than three days pnor tó the sJrv,ce drsruptron. The crty supprylng the water agrees to use best effortsand reasonable diltgence to notrfy the City receiving the water as soon after ¡t becomes aware of the need fòr serv¡ce-dtsruptron andfurther wlll, to the extent practrcal, llmÍ the serv¡ce dlsruptron to daylqht hours Auburn shall read the meter upon actrvatlon and upon deactlvat¡on of the¡ntertle The clty supplyrng the water shall verify the lnformation and shallthen calculate and rnvorce the other cily for t-he water used durrng therequest The tnvotce shall be calculated by the totalwater used dunn! theevent The rate shall be at the current Auburn or Kent Wholesale Ratedependrng on whrch city rs supplyrng the water. This shall be completepayment for the water, labor, and adm¡n¡strat¡on of actvating the rntert¡e The total prolect costs shall rnclude costs for consultrng desrgn servtce, and construct¡on These costs shail be paid for by the ıry of kent. Thepro¡ect costs shall be revtewed and agreed upon by Pubhc Work Drrectorsof both crtles at the begrnnrng and ðnd of each ıtage descnbed aboveEagh City rs responstble for assocrated